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Wrestling And Rough Playing


Guest Jubilee251
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Guest Jubilee251

Having been in the house for 2 months, Molly has settled in, gotten over the cat-chasing and statue-ing, and is 100% perfect (ok, maybe 99%!). I'm more just looking for thoughts and various input on this.

 

She is other-breed friendly. I've mentioned a few times that I take her to the dog park a few times at week at 6:30 AM - it's pretty empty and we have informal play dates with a Doberman and a little dutch shepherd mix puppy. She runs around, chases balls with the other dogs, roaches for belly rubs when she needs a break, and is just generally great. So she is not dog/other-breed-aggressive or anything like that.

 

She is very much a dog that feeds off other dogs' energy. If they are calm and low-key, she doesn't try to engage them. However, we have a few high-energy, wrasslin' dogs in our condo that seem to rile her up. I've seen them play in our condo "yard" and they do the typical rough play, with ear biting, tumbling, etc. When Molly sees this, she immediately wants in on the action but she seems to be almost too into it, if that makes any sense (and these are big dogs, not little ones kicking off her prey-drive).

 

Of course, as a first-time dog owner, it's daunting to see dogs really going at it like that when they really are playing. She will roll them over, pin them, chew on their ears, and snap at their head if the dog runs near her. She does NOT stiffen, growl or snarl, or do any of the "correctional" behavior I've seen in her when she is annoyed. And again, this is only with dogs who are playfully rough - I've pulled her off the last few times she's done this, and the other dog always comes back for more, trying to play. And if I put her back on leash and let the other dogs play, she will strain as if to say "Come on, mom!!!! I wanna play too!"

 

I've stopped letting her play because I'm paranoid about her getting hurt. And I'm not muzzling her when the other dogs aren't muzzled. Does this sound like she is going after the other dogs, or just wants to play? And do you guys not let the dogs play too rough?

Edited by Jubilee251
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Guest sorenkkg

I have high-prey dogs, so little ones are "out" for us. I've seen mine with other breeds, but generally we stick with greyhound play dates.

 

That having been said: when Haka was an only dog we went to a groomer who specialized in rescued dogs, and often babysat at her house, so there was always a pack of all sorts. We'd put away the little ones and she would insist I let Haka play with the bigger dogs. And I would FREAK when they would bark and bitey-face and stuff, and it was always fine.

 

We always watched, and would step in if something were going sideways, but even though it was Haka, since the other dogs were his size, it wound up ok. The one time he went for a belly (his favorite) he got a MASSIVE paw in the face :lol:

 

What I learned from the groomer/dog whisperer, and from her leader of the pack, is that there is a lot that goes on between dogs that we don't even hear, and as long as there are no big issues (like you mentioned: high prey drive or general issues with other breeds) then we need to understand that dogs play rough!

 

I was new to dogs too when we got Haka, but now (6yrs and we also have his sister) I get it. This isn't to say that we don't step in if Haka or Aleeya are being overly obnoxious at our grey play dates (ganging up on another grey)... but barking, some pawing, showing some dominance, I think it's all part of it.

 

Just be aware that your grey has MUCH thinner skin than any other breed she plays with, so check her over every time-- a little scratch easily turns into an "event" with us grey owners, and that would be my main concern.

Always supervise and be ready to step in, but I think playing and socializing with other breeds is a good idea.

 

JMO :)

Soren

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No muzzle is the way to go in those situations. You don't want her to be toothless if the play turns suddenly into something more serious. That being said, you know your dog and you know how she plays. You also seem to have a good handle on the other dogs involved. If she's having fun and playing and everything's going great, I would let them play. Not all greyhounds like that kind of rough-housing. Just make sure you are super vigilant monitoring the playing and that you take your dog away if it seems to be getting beyond normal play behavior.

 

Also keep in mind that a play bite or pawing that wouldn't phase a lab or shepherd will likely cause your greyhound an injury due to their thin skin. So you need to balance her need for play-time with her safety.

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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This sounds exactly like the way Rainy plays with my parents 1yr old shepard. I would never let her play with a strange dog like that and she's never tried to. She gets after the puppy so much that you can see his fur fly literally. Its all fun and games and the puppy loves it. Plus he's a huge PIA so he needs a good butt kicking every once in a while. If it makes you uncomfortable than don't let her do it. There is always a risk of the other dog biting too hard, or their nails ripping her skin open. The dangers are always there

------

 

Jessica

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Mine plays with different dogs in different ways. Some she'll pin down and they'll get back up and chase, other's she'll prentend to nip at their tails, with others she'll jink and twirl around looking back at them to encourage a chase. She gives out Calming Signals and reads them well in other dogs. They only dogs she is uneasy with are those that don't use calming signals and other canine body language to signal their intent; I can see this too and won't let her engage with such dogs. Also as soon as the play gets too rough I'll intervene with a redirection cue.

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

You will definitely get both sides of the spectrum here. Personally I have two hounds that play very rough with each other, and two hounds that dont care for the rough play. You can instantly see the difference. When one doesnt want to play rough, their attitude is very different, as well as the dog that is actually playing will "usually" get the message and either submit, or stop altogether. I would not muzzle in this situation as the muzzle could actually cause injury if the other dogs get their teeth caught in the muzzle while attempting to play. I wouldnt stop the play, of course you are responsible and will monitor all play, so just be aware that with rough play the chances of tearing skin increases when they use their legs to "rake" their opponent. When they are biting each other, not so much.

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Guest greytmiles

Does this sound like she is going after the other dogs, or just wants to play? And do you guys not let the dogs play too rough?

 

I just started bringing my Miles to our local dog park (he's been with us for 7 weeks now), and I came away from the experience with the exact same questions. Thank you for posting! I've never had a dog before, and am definitely in the worried-mother category on this one.

 

If she's having fun and playing and everything's going great, I would let them play. Not all greyhounds like that kind of rough-housing. Just make sure you are super vigilant monitoring the playing and that you take your dog away if it seems to be getting beyond normal play behavior.

 

Could someone maybe explain a bit what to look or listen for if things are getting 'beyond play' and into aggressive?

Thank you!

 

Erin

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Things I look for - and hopefully someone with better info will chime in!

 

A dog about to attack seriously will be quiet - no barking or growling. Their head can be either low and threatening or high and stiff, with staring the other dog right in the eyes. Tails are still and tense. Hackles up (though this happens when they play too). Attitude and posture are braced and tense. Dogs will usually be facing head to head instead of head to side or head to tail.

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

Since there are some questions, here is a video of my two "rough" players, Bart and Olive. They are playing the typical "bitey-face" game that greyhounds play. I have seen others post play videos as well, so maybe someone else will post another so you can see how it is common. Now for those that have had their hounds less than 6 months or so, I STRONGLY discourage going to the park. The reason being is this, your hound has no recall at all, and if something gets your hound overly stimulated, you will have a very difficult time getting your hound to respond. I suggest a basic obedience class as well as recall training before you begin to play at the park. If you live in a city environment where you have no yard, then I would suggest the dog park on "off" hours and to remove your hound whenever there are small (less than 30lbs) dogs present. I find a sports whistle as an excellent recall tool. My hounds actually have been called off an active bunny pursuit by the whistle. I doubt it would ever work again, but it did work once. Here is the video I was talking about:

 

 

 

th_biteyface.jpg

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Guest Bang_o_rama

Since there are some questions, here is a video of my two "rough" players, Bart and Olive. They are playing the typical "bitey-face" game that greyhounds play.

 

Cute vid. I am always impressed at how good dogs (and cats!) generally are at controlling their bite force; all that bitey-face play and no GSODs, no apparent damage at all.

 

Is bitey-face more effective with a roman-nosed grey :-) ?

 

~D~

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