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Meeting Other Dogs


Guest Sunset123
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Guest Sunset123

I'm pretty sure my girl Arrisa has never met a non-greyhound dog. I've had her for about a month and it's really important to me to find out if she's friendly with other breeds. I'm confident that she is not little-dog safe: they all make her bark and pull.

 

As far as normal-sized dogs go, she doesn't pay them much heed when we see them on walks. She looks at them, but generally doesn't whine, pull, or bark. I'd love it if I could confidently let her get close to another dog and sniff its butt. However, whenever we pass a dog it barks at her! I don't know if it's aggression or what, but I'm afraid we're getting off on the wrong foot as far as socialization goes.

 

Does anyone have any tips for introducing other dogs or ideas why the other dogs bark at her?

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Guest GradStudent

I would like to know this too. My Penny wants to go up and play with other dogs, she tries pulling a lot and whines at me when I won't let her while we're on walks. And if we pass dogs closely the others will bark at her.

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I've always assumed it's because most other dogs are in general barky ---holes. :rolleyes: Beth always wants to meet other dogs and isn't as good at ignoring them as I'd like (she's friendly when we do have a greeting), but of course she's a grey so she doesn't bark. (Except when playing -- she's really barky then!) Are you sure the dogs you're seeing aren't barking at all the dogs they encounter?

With Cocoa (DC Chocolatedrop), missing B for Beth (2006-2015)
And kitties C.J., Klara, Bernadette, John-Boy, & Sinbad

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I would guess that the barking dogs are not well socialized and don't have good dog social skills - something most greyhounds excel at since they are raised longer with their litters, and live/train amongst other greys. They're not removed from their mothers and siblings at 8-12 weeks and sent off to live on their own. Arrisa might be a bit put off by the loud barking and rough behavior, but that doesn't mean she isn't "safe" to be around them. Often greys get labeled as aggressive by other breed owners when they are only trying to administer a dog-to-dog correction for bad behavior - which can include growling, snapping, and even small bites.

 

It's hard to say from her behavior whether she's not small-dog tolerant or not. She might be fine with some structured exposure, a muzzle, and gentle correction. In general, a not-safe grey will be very quiet and *super* focused on the "prey" animal. They cannot be distracted or corrected away, have an upright posture, with stiff body language and highly held tails.

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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Guest Sunset123

I've always assumed it's because most other dogs are in general barky ---holes. :rolleyes: Beth always wants to meet other dogs and isn't as good at ignoring them as I'd like (she's friendly when we do have a greeting), but of course she's a grey so she doesn't bark. (Except when playing -- she's really barky then!) Are you sure the dogs you're seeing aren't barking at all the dogs they encounter?

 

I have no idea. The owners certainly don't seem surprised by the barking. I might be over-analyzing.

 

I would guess that the barking dogs are not well socialized and don't have good dog social skills - something most greyhounds excel at since they are raised longer with their litters, and live/train amongst other greys. They're not removed from their mothers and siblings at 8-12 weeks and sent off to live on their own. Arrisa might be a bit put off by the loud barking and rough behavior, but that doesn't mean she isn't "safe" to be around them. Often greys get labeled as aggressive by other breed owners when they are only trying to administer a dog-to-dog correction for bad behavior - which can include growling, snapping, and even small bites.

 

It's hard to say from her behavior whether she's not small-dog tolerant or not. She might be fine with some structured exposure, a muzzle, and gentle correction. In general, a not-safe grey will be very quiet and *super* focused on the "prey" animal. They cannot be distracted or corrected away, have an upright posture, with stiff body language and highly held tails.

 

Hmm... interesting. I have no idea how I'd go about getting her socialized with any dog, let alone the little barky ones that set her off. I'm considering doing a class with a pro trainer/behavioralist.

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Guest PiagetsMom

 

It's hard to say from her behavior whether she's not small-dog tolerant or not. She might be fine with some structured exposure, a muzzle, and gentle correction. In general, a not-safe grey will be very quiet and *super* focused on the "prey" animal. They cannot be distracted or corrected away, have an upright posture, with stiff body language and highly held tails.

 

This would most definitely describe my Mirage, who I've come to believe is a total breed snob. He becomes fixated very early, often before I even see the other dog approaching. When we're walking and I see his body language change, I immediately start looking for the dog he's already seen.

 

I've always assumed it's because most other dogs are in general barky ---holes. rolleyes.gif Beth always wants to meet other dogs and isn't as good at ignoring them as I'd like (she's friendly when we do have a greeting), but of course she's a grey so she doesn't bark. (Except when playing -- she's really barky then!) Are you sure the dogs you're seeing aren't barking at all the dogs they encounter?

 

Mirage always draws a reaction from whatever dog we're passing - they obviously read his body language signals - at which point he becomes very aggitated. I'd like to think that it's all the other dogs being "barky ---holes", but in our case, I don't think that's it. We work on it daily with the "look at me" treat method in order to deal with it. For us, it's not really a socialization issue.

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Guest Sunset123

 

Mirage always draws a reaction from whatever dog we're passing - they obviously read his body language signals - at which point he becomes very aggitated. I'd like to think that it's all the other dogs being "barky ---holes", but in our case, I don't think that's it. We work on it daily with the "look at me" treat method in order to deal with it. For us, it's not really a socialization issue.

 

This is what I'm afraid of.

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I found attending some general obedience classes with a good trainer very helpful for introducing Doc to all those strange new other breeds of dog in a controlled environment - and for learning more about doggy body language myself. If you've only had her a month I personally would wait a month or so longer before starting classes, but why not starting looking for suitable ones now? A good trainer would let you come along and sit in on a class as an observer, so you can see whether it's the kind of environment that would suit you and your dog.

Clare with Tiger (Snapper Gar, b. 18/05/2015), and remembering Ken (Boomtown Ken, 01/05/2011-21/02/2020) and Doc (Barefoot Doctor, 20/08/2001-15/04/2015).

"It is also to be noted of every species, that the handsomest of each move best ... and beasts of the most elegant form, always excel in speed; of this, the horse and greyhound are beautiful examples."----Wiliam Hogarth, The Analysis of Beauty, 1753.

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Guest Sunset123

I found attending some general obedience classes with a good trainer very helpful for introducing Doc to all those strange new other breeds of dog in a controlled environment - and for learning more about doggy body language myself. If you've only had her a month I personally would wait a month or so longer before starting classes, but why not starting looking for suitable ones now? A good trainer would let you come along and sit in on a class as an observer, so you can see whether it's the kind of environment that would suit you and your dog.

 

That's a good point. I found a "Socially Secure and Adept Program" offered by a local training school and it starts up this weekend.

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Guest GreyBrindle

you are not alone...our Connie, who is very shy and reserved is constantly barked at and it is usually the smaller dogs that do it. the fact of the matter is that the smaller dogs are not well socialized or trained by their owners and as such essentially act as jerks.

 

about a week after we got her a small dog just went rabid when he saw her and eventually broke loose from her owner and bit our Connie. Luckily the owner paid for all the medical expenses but it really set our dog back as far as trying to socialize her with other dogs...since she's so shy the barking really makes her nervous.

 

it all comes down to insecurities on the part of the other dogs, just like in people...go figure =\

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Guest AGirlNamedMe

Bella gets barked at by little dogs, too.

 

She just stands there (as tall as she can) and looks at them like they are insane.

 

Maybe because they are! :D

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Guest Sunset123

Bella gets barked at by little dogs, too.

 

She just stands there (as tall as she can) and looks at them like they are insane.

 

Maybe because they are! :D

 

It doesn't surprise me that the little dogs bark at her (they bark at everything!), but labs and shepherds?

 

I just signed us up for a "socially secure and adept" program at a local training school. I'm feeling much less anxious now that we're going to have some guided interaction. I'm looking forward to learning how to better read her body language, too.

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

It is difficult to give you an answer as you didn't really give your hounds behavior during the meetings. Dogs communicate by barking as well as a whole plethora of non-verbal ques. The issue could lie with how your hound is reacting to the other hounds, and your hounds behavior could be a matter of her picking up on your body language. If you are nervous, your girl is likely to be on edge as well and that will be picked up by surrounding hounds. Basically you need to be sure to be calm, and confident. Don't worry about what "could" happen. If you are in a group of hounds, give it a second, if things start to get strange, simply grab a short leash with your girl and walk her out. If the hounds are close and going nuts, simply keep the same short leash and keep on walking, don't even comment to your hound about the barking dogs. Greyhounds will usually ignore the crazy dogs, usually. If your hound reacts, then remove her from the situation. If she reacts and you keep her in the situation or if you coddle her, then you will be reinforcing the behavior. More information is really needed to give good advice, but the standard advise for any reactive dog/situation is to stay calm, confident and firm and your hound will have the best chance of acceptable behavior. After all, they look to us as their leader, so you need to lead with confidence. Maybe post some more details of the situation and others here can help assess the situation.

 

Chad

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Guest Sunset123

It is difficult to give you an answer as you didn't really give your hounds behavior during the meetings. Dogs communicate by barking as well as a whole plethora of non-verbal ques. The issue could lie with how your hound is reacting to the other hounds, and your hounds behavior could be a matter of her picking up on your body language. If you are nervous, your girl is likely to be on edge as well and that will be picked up by surrounding hounds. Basically you need to be sure to be calm, and confident. Don't worry about what "could" happen. If you are in a group of hounds, give it a second, if things start to get strange, simply grab a short leash with your girl and walk her out. If the hounds are close and going nuts, simply keep the same short leash and keep on walking, don't even comment to your hound about the barking dogs. Greyhounds will usually ignore the crazy dogs, usually. If your hound reacts, then remove her from the situation. If she reacts and you keep her in the situation or if you coddle her, then you will be reinforcing the behavior. More information is really needed to give good advice, but the standard advise for any reactive dog/situation is to stay calm, confident and firm and your hound will have the best chance of acceptable behavior. After all, they look to us as their leader, so you need to lead with confidence. Maybe post some more details of the situation and others here can help assess the situation.

 

Chad

 

We haven't had any meetings, we've just passed by other dogs on walks (or jogs with my husband). We haven't been able to get nose to nose when any other dog because the other dogs start barking if we get anywhere close. If we're on the same side of the street I've tried to give wide berth. Sometimes I'll bring her to the side to let the other dog pass if they're moving in the opposite direction. I admit that I'm not looking at her too closely when this happens because I'm trying to keep my cool (and watch the other dog and its owner for signs of "my dog isn't nice"). Her head is up, her ears are usually perked, and she seems to go a bit stiff. If the barking dog is close by she'll often respond by barking a few times herself. If the dog is on the other side of the street and barking at her she doesn't bark back.

 

You're right that I probably give off some unintentional nervous cues. I'm hoping that I'll get professional feedback on this at the socialization program we're starting this Saturday. My last dogs were a pair of very dog-aggressive aussie sisters who couldn't go near any other dogs. I'm terrified of finding out the bad way that my dog isn't friendly.

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

Good idea to take your hound to a class, excellent ownership. One thing to note, nose to nose meetings of dogs is considered an agressive way of meeting. Nose to butt and a wide sweeping motion is the "natural" way dogs meet each other. Its when humans get involved with raising hounds in a human-centric way that dogs lose their instinctual communication. That may be one other que that the other dogs are acting on, they don't speak the same "dog language" as the greyhound. This is a common occurance.

 

Chad

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Guest Sunset123

Good idea to take your hound to a class, excellent ownership. One thing to note, nose to nose meetings of dogs is considered an agressive way of meeting. Nose to butt and a wide sweeping motion is the "natural" way dogs meet each other. Its when humans get involved with raising hounds in a human-centric way that dogs lose their instinctual communication. That may be one other que that the other dogs are acting on, they don't speak the same "dog language" as the greyhound. This is a common occurance.

 

Chad

 

I was too polite to say butt-sniffing. :)

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Guest Sunset123

It is difficult to give you an answer as you didn't really give your hounds behavior during the meetings. Dogs communicate by barking as well as a whole plethora of non-verbal ques. The issue could lie with how your hound is reacting to the other hounds, and your hounds behavior could be a matter of her picking up on your body language. If you are nervous, your girl is likely to be on edge as well and that will be picked up by surrounding hounds. Basically you need to be sure to be calm, and confident. Don't worry about what "could" happen. If you are in a group of hounds, give it a second, if things start to get strange, simply grab a short leash with your girl and walk her out. If the hounds are close and going nuts, simply keep the same short leash and keep on walking, don't even comment to your hound about the barking dogs. Greyhounds will usually ignore the crazy dogs, usually. If your hound reacts, then remove her from the situation. If she reacts and you keep her in the situation or if you coddle her, then you will be reinforcing the behavior. More information is really needed to give good advice, but the standard advise for any reactive dog/situation is to stay calm, confident and firm and your hound will have the best chance of acceptable behavior. After all, they look to us as their leader, so you need to lead with confidence. Maybe post some more details of the situation and others here can help assess the situation.

 

Chad

 

So, this afternoon on our walk we passed by a border collie on the other side of the street who gave us a bark. We were walking as calmly as can be, Arrisa was just doing her walking/sniffing thing and didn't stop and stare or stiffen up. Curious, I looped back so we'd have another pass of the same dog. Again, barking from that dog, but nothing weird from Arrisa's end that I could see. We were on the other side of the street and I was relaxed. I stopped and asked the owner if her dog barks at all other dogs. She said no, but she does have a tendency toward leash aggression. I explained that I just trying to figure out if Arrisa is giving off some funky dog body language.

 

I think I'll continue the experiment and ask the same of other friendly-looking dog-walkers.

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You know, your answer may be that there's nothing wrong with YOUR dog!!!! :D

 

(Completely off the subject - are you guys going to make it up for the Valentine's Gala??? We'd love to meet up, and Toni's in the Fashion Show!)

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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Guest Sunset123

You know, your answer may be that there's nothing wrong with YOUR dog!!!! :D

 

(Completely off the subject - are you guys going to make it up for the Valentine's Gala??? We'd love to meet up, and Toni's in the Fashion Show!)

 

This is the first I've heard of it, actually. I just looked it up and it looks like a really great event and I'd love to be there! Unfortunately, we wouldn't be able to make it up to Portland that day. We're going to a meet & greet here in Eugene in the afternoon and then to our first socialization class that evening.

 

(Also, maybe the barking is dog language for: "Nice legs! Lookin good, chica!" ;) )

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