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New Owner - Aggression Question


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Guest newgreyowner7

Hi.

 

We adopted a 2 year old male greyhound about 3 weeks ago. We had some issues with separation anxiety the first week, but that situation has improved. During the first week or so, he growled at my son a couple of times. We weren't sure why and the behavior seemed to stop after my son became more involved in his care (feeding, walking, etc.) However, in the last few days, he has growled and snapped at my son and daughter--one time each. I had advised everyone not to touch him when he was sleeping because of sleep aggression. My daughter was petting his belly while he was awake in his bed and he was loving it. When she would stop, he would reach out to her for more. So, as she was doing this, he suddenly barked and snapped at her. With the growling, we were told to look him in the eye and firmly say "no," but my daughter was nervous and just jumped and moved away. I made eye contact with him and said, "No!" That was a few days ago. Since then, nobody touches him when he is in his bed, even when he is awake and motioning for someone to come pet him. Tonight, my son had been playing with him trying to teach him to bring this toy to him and play fetch. They both seemed to have a great time. A little while later, the dog was in his bed (not sure if he was sleeping or awake), and my son was walking through the room. He was not talking to or looking at the dog. He was just walking by. The dog barked and bared his teeth in a very menacing looking way. Again, my son sort of just screamed and backed up. I was a few feet away in another room and immediately made eye contact with the dog and yelled, "No!."

 

So, I'm confused by the dog's behavior and am unsure of what to do about it. He's really a sweetheart and very affectionate, except for these instances. I would appreciate any advice. I don't want the kids to be afraid of him and I want to end the behavior before it progresses.

 

Thank you.

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Sounds like he has some issues with guarding his bed space. What you do and how you handle it depends on how comfortable you and your children are interacting with him. You will get answers from different people, some with kids and some without.

 

You don't say how old your children are, but they sound old enough to follow a simple rule like "Don't pet the dog when he's on his bed." You've already started doing this and that's good. Have them call him to them - away from his bed - for pets and play. You also may want to move his bed so it's a little more out of the way.

 

If you can, encourage your kids to not be afraid of him when he does react like that. It's very scary when thay snarl and lead with their teeth, but *most of the time* it's only for show. We had a girl here who would growl if you walked by the room out in the hall - to her way of thinking, it was ALL her's and she was just warning us away. BUT we corrected her gently but consistently and she did get much better over time. So if your kids can learn to say "Oh yeah! Big Dog!" and keep walking it will go a long way towards showing your new grey that no one is going to take his bed away. Add a gentle correction as you correct him for other bad behavior. Most greys are pretty sensitive, so yelling and loud voices are not necessary. A loud non-word sound like "EH!" or "AH!" will usually be enough to break their concentration and stop the behavior.

 

And he's still very new to your house. Remember, greyhounds are NEVER startled on their beds. No one touches them without their knowing. No one gets in their kennel space at all. So all of this is very very different for him. He will likely relax as he settles in.

 

Congrats and good luck!

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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I agree it sounds like you're doing a great job, and your kids are also. I just want to comment on the issue where he growled at your son walking by the bed. My girl did that a few times in the first few months we had her. I think we need to teach the dog about the trade-off: I will respect you in your bed, however, you must not growl at people simply for being nearby. So if you walk or stand a little too close and your dog fusses, stand your ground for a minute and make an assertive "AH!" sound like Greysmom said. The only difference is instead of continuing to walk by, I would actually stop and hold my ground for a few seconds.

 

When Capri was new to us, she mostly did this in her dining room bed because it's in the corner of the room. When I went to set the table, I had to walk near her bed. She very quickly learned that I was not infringing on her bed space and there was no need to growl. And that I would not tolerate her dictating where her space boundaries were, *I* dictated where they were.

Sharon, Loki, Freyja, Capri (bridge angel and most beloved heart dog), Ajax (bridge angel) and Sweetie Pie (cat)

Visit Hound-Safe.com by Something Special Pet Supplies for muzzles and other dog safety products

:gh_bow

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Remember the saying, "let sleeping dogs lay"?

 

This applies to all dogs, especially greyhounds. No one should go near your boy when he is lying down- regardless of whether or not he is asking for pets. Let him come to you.

Some dogs sleep with their eyes open. He has given his warning growl and snap. That is the only way he can communicate to you that he does not like what is happening. If he wanted to bite- he would have. Can you move his bed so that no one can walk back and forth by him when he is resting? In a corner but in a room where every one hangs out would be best so he has his own space.

 

Have you read this yet?

 

Of all breeds of dogs, the ex-racing Greyhound has never had to be responsible for anything in his life. His whole existence has been a dog-centered one. This breed has never been asked to do anything for itself, make any decisions or answer any questions. It has been waited on, paw and tail. The only prohibition in a racing

Greyhound's life is not to get into a fight----------------or eat certain stuff in the turn out pen.

 

Let us review a little. From weaning until you go away for schooling, at probably a year and a half, you eat, grow and run around with your siblings. When you go away to begin your racing career, you get your own "apartment," in a large housing development. No one is allowed in your bed but you, and when you are in there, no one can touch you, without plenty of warning.

 

Someone hears a vehicle drive up, or the kennel door being unlocked. The light switches are flipped on. The loud mouths in residence, and there always are some, begin to bark or howl. You are wide awake by the time the human opens your door to turn you out. A Greyhound has never been touched while he was asleep.

 

You eat when you are fed, usually on a strict schedule. No one asks if you are hungry or what you want to eat. You are never told not to eat any food within your reach. No one ever touches your bowl while you are eating. You are not to be disturbed because it is important you clean your plate.

 

You are not asked if you have to "go outside." You are placed in a turn out pen and it isn't long before you get the idea of what you are supposed to do while you are out there. Unless you really get out of hand, you may chase, rough house and put your feet on everyone and every thing else. The only humans you know are the "waiters" who feed you, and the "restroom attendants" who turn you out to go to the bathroom. Respect people? Surely you jest.

 

No one comes into or goes out of your kennel without your knowledge. You are all seeing; all knowing. There are no surprises, day in and day out. The only thing it is ever hoped you will do is win, place or show, and that you don't have much control over. It is in your blood, it is in your heart, it is in your fate-- or it is not.

 

And when it is not, then suddenly you are expected to be a civilized person in a fur coat. But people don't realize you may not even speak English. Some of you don't even know your names, because you didn't need to. You were not asked or told to do anything as an individual; you were always part of the "condo association?; the sorority or fraternity and everyone did everything together, as a group or pack. The only time you did anything as an individual is when you schooled or raced, and even then, You Were Not Alone.

 

In my "mobile abode," the Greyhounds each have several unique names, but they also have a single common name: it is Everybody. We continue to do things as a group, pack or as we are affectionately known in-house, by Kathleen's Husbandit, "The Thundering Herd."

 

Back to those who have not been permanently homed. Suddenly, he is expected to behave himself in places he's never been taught how to act. He is expected to take responsibility for saying when he needs to go outside, to come when he is called, not to get on some or all of the furniture, and to not eat food off counters and tables. He is dropped in a world that is not his, and totally without warning, at that.

 

Almost everything he does is wrong. Suddenly he is a minority. Now he is just a pet. He is unemployed, in a place where people expect him to know the rules and the schedule, even when there aren't any. (How many times have you heard someone say, "He won't tell me when he has to go out." What kind of schedule is that?) Have you heard the joke about the dog who says, "My name is No-No Bad Dog. What's yours?" To me that is not even funny. All the protective barriers are gone. There is no more warning before something happens. There is no more strength in numbers. He wakes up with a monster human face two inches from his. (With some people's breath, this could scare Godzilla.) Why should he not, believe that this "someone," who has crept up on him, isn't going to eat him for lunch? (I really do have to ask you ladies to consider how you would react if someone you barely knew crawled up on you while you were asleep?) No, I will not ask for any male input.

 

Now he is left alone, for the first time in his life, in a strange place, with no idea of what will happen or how long it will be before someone comes to him again. If he is not crated, he may go though walls, windows or over fences, desperately seeking something familiar, something with which to reconnect his life. If he does get free, he will find the familiarity, within himself: the adrenaline high, the wind in his ears, the blood pulsing and racing though his heart once again--until he crashes into a car.

 

Often, the first contact with his new family is punishment, something he's never had before, something he doesn't understand now, especially in the middle of the rest of the chaos. And worst of all, what are the most common human reactions to misbehavior? We live in a violent society, where the answer to any irritation is a slap, punch, kick, whip, or rub your nose in it. Under these circumstances, sometimes I think any successful adoption is a miracle.

 

He is, in effect, expected to have all the manners of at least a six-year old child. But, how many of you would leave an unfamiliar six-year old human alone and loose in your home for hours at a time and not expect to find who knows what when you got back? Consider that if you did, you could be brought up on charges of child abuse, neglect and endangerment. Yet, people do this to Greyhounds and this is often the reason for so many returns.

 

How many dogs have been returned because they did not know how to tell the adoptor when they had to go out? How many for jumping on people, getting on furniture, counter surfing, separation anxiety, or defensive actions due to being startled or hurt (aka growling or biting)? So, let's understand: Sometimes it is the dog's "fault" he cannot fit in. He is not equipped with the social skills of a six-year old human. But with your love and help, you can make it happen.

 

 

ROBIN ~ Mom to: Beau Think It Aint, Chloe JC Allthewayhome, Teddy ICU Drunk Sailor, Elsie N Fracine , Ollie RG's Travertine, Ponch A's Jupiter~ Yoshi, Zoobie & Belle, the kitties.

Waiting at the bridge Angel Polli Bohemian Ocean , Rocky, Blue,Sasha & Zoobie & Bobbi

Greyhound Angels Adoption (GAA) The Lexus Project

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Guest tatahills

This is a common problem with new greyhounds. Keep in mind this is a whole new world for your greyhound. They don't yet understand what this environment is and how they fit into it. It's our job to show them. don't let your children go to the dog, always have the children call the dog to them. That puts the kids in charge. Every time he growls at someone there must be a consequence . Make him get up from the bed. Don't pull him, he has to move away from you. At first you can use something in your hand, this makes you feel more confident and the dog knows your serious. Use a word such as "hey" or "get" while you walk over to him with a broom, tennis racket or something like that. Some dogs respond right away, others have to be tapped with whatever you have in your hand. I tap on the thigh. Your dog gets the message that your in control and doesn't give him power. If people move away when they growl that gives the dog power. Something that starts out as an insecurity in your dog can turn into something else so he must have a consequence. You will only need the object in your hand a few times at most. They will respond to the word after you get your message across. Greyhounds like to feel secure in the fact that you are in control and they don't have to be. They have been told what to do while at the track. Once you get your greyhound to the point that he feels secure, understands what his role is and where he fits in, then you can start helping him become a family pet. They get there it just takes some time. Good luck. And no belly rubs for now!

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

I would strongly suggest you contact the group you got your hound from. Advise them of the issue so that they can give you some one-on-one support/ guidance so that this issue does not continue. I would STRONGLY suggest against physical intimidation (a broom or tennis racket) with your hound as it could cause an opposite reaction from what you expect (the hound could decide to defend itself from the threat). If you did not get your hound from a group, then I would suggest you contact the closest greyhound group and ask for help. Any local group I am sure would be willing to help out regardless of where you got your hound from. Above all, this is an issue that is workable. Have you read the book "Greyhounds for Dummies" or "Adopting the retired greyhound"? These are two books that are a must for greyhound adoption. There are also other books such as "The other end of the leash" that is exceptional. Maybe someone here will recommend a good book for families with children. As stated above, your children should never approach your hound when it is laying down, regardless of if it is a sleep or not, and DEFINITELY never allowed to approach your hound when it is in its crate (do you have a crate for him?).

 

Chad

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Guest tatahills

I would strongly suggest you contact the group you got your hound from. Advise them of the issue so that they can give you some one-on-one support/ guidance so that this issue does not continue. I would STRONGLY suggest against physical intimidation (a broom or tennis racket) with your hound as it could cause an opposite reaction from what you expect (the hound could decide to defend itself from the threat). If you did not get your hound from a group, then I would suggest you contact the closest greyhound group and ask for help. Any local group I am sure would be willing to help out regardless of where you got your hound from. Above all, this is an issue that is workable. Have you read the book "Greyhounds for Dummies" or "Adopting the retired greyhound"? These are two books that are a must for greyhound adoption. There are also other books such as "The other end of the leash" that is exceptional. Maybe someone here will recommend a good book for families with children. As stated above, your children should never approach your hound when it is laying down, regardless of if it is a sleep or not, and DEFINITELY never allowed to approach your hound when it is in its crate (do you have a crate for him?).

 

Chad

Oh my god. It's not physical intimidation it's to help the person feel like they have a tool and not feel insecure which the dog will read as weak. The broom isn't about the dog it's about the person. ugh This technique has worked with everyone who I have helped use it. It's easy, quick, and it helps get the message across. Dogs claim space by standing and owning the space. That's all this technique does for a person not experienced. Simple fix. Dogs aren't that complex.

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Guest newgreyowner7

Thank you all for your responses. My children are all teenagers and I will have them read your replies. After talking to my son, it seems as though the dog may have thought my son was coming towards his bed to get the furry ball they had been playing with earlier (it was in the bed with him). The dog was awake and looking at my son. My son looked at the dog for a second, then looked away and kept walking. That is when the dog barked and growled. With my daughter, I looked at some photos I had taken seconds before he growled and barked at her. In one photo, his eyes are 3/4 of the way closed. I'm wondering if he fell asleep while she was petting him and then was startled.

 

Either way, we will try not to be intimidated by this behavior and respond appropriately. It's hard, though, because it is a bit scary. Both of his beds are in the corners of rooms, but we live in a fairly small house so he will have to get used to people walking by. I don't think I'm comfortable with the tennis racquet idea. We are not using the crate because the dog was extremely stressed in it that first week and actually bent it up and broke out of the small opening he made. I can't believe he didn't get hurt. He also jumped over the baby gates and was very stressed when we tried to confine him to just the dining room. Now, when we go out, we just put the baby gate at the bottom of the stairs and he has the run of the downstairs. He was doing well with this up until the recent snowstorms. We have all been home so much during the last week and a half, I think he may have a difficult day tomorrow when we all go back to work/school.

 

I will also check with the adoption group again and see if they have any more ideas, and would appreciate any further responses. Thank you.

Edited by newgreyowner7
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Guest tatahills

Thank you all for your responses. My children are all teenagers and I will have them read your replies. After talking to my son, it seems as though the dog may have thought my son was coming towards his bed to get the furry ball they had been playing with earlier (it was in the bed with him). The dog was awake and looking at my son. My son looked at the dog for a second, then looked away and kept walking. That is when the dog barked and growled. With my daughter, I looked at some photos I had taken seconds before he growled and barked at her. In one photo, his eyes are 3/4 of the way closed. I'm wondering if he fell asleep while she was petting him and then was startled.

 

Either way, we will try not to be intimidated by this behavior and respond appropriately. It's hard, though, because it is a bit scary. Both of his beds are in the corners of rooms, but we live in a fairly small house so he will have to get used to people walking by. I don't think I'm comfortable with the tennis racquet idea. We are not using the crate because the dog was extremely stressed in it that first week and actually bent it up and broke out of the small opening he made. I can't believe he didn't get hurt. He also jumped over the baby gates and was very stressed when we tried to confine him to just the dining room. Now, when we go out, we just put the baby gate at the bottom of the stairs and he has the run of the downstairs. He was doing well with this up until the recent snowstorms. We have all been home so much during the last week and a half, I think he may have a difficult day tomorrow when we all go back to work/school.

 

I will also check with the adoption group again and see if they have any more ideas, and would appreciate any further responses. Thank you.

 

Thank you all for your responses. My children are all teenagers and I will have them read your replies. After talking to my son, it seems as though the dog may have thought my son was coming towards his bed to get the furry ball they had been playing with earlier (it was in the bed with him). The dog was awake and looking at my son. My son looked at the dog for a second, then looked away and kept walking. That is when the dog barked and growled. With my daughter, I looked at some photos I had taken seconds before he growled and barked at her. In one photo, his eyes are 3/4 of the way closed. I'm wondering if he fell asleep while she was petting him and then was startled.

 

Either way, we will try not to be intimidated by this behavior and respond appropriately. It's hard, though, because it is a bit scary. Both of his beds are in the corners of rooms, but we live in a fairly small house so he will have to get used to people walking by. I don't think I'm comfortable with the tennis racquet idea. We are not using the crate because the dog was extremely stressed in it that first week and actually bent it up and broke out of the small opening he made. I can't believe he didn't get hurt. He also jumped over the baby gates and was very stressed when we tried to confine him to just the dining room. Now, when we go out, we just put the baby gate at the bottom of the stairs and he has the run of the downstairs. He was doing well with this up until the recent snowstorms. We have all been home so much during the last week and a half, I think he may have a difficult day tomorrow when we all go back to work/school.

 

I will also check with the adoption group again and see if they have any more ideas, and would appreciate any further responses. Thank you.

I'll be happy to help you. You can find my contact information at www.heidispetservice.com

I will volunteer my services like I do for all greyhound owners.

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

You are correct, dogs aren't that complex, they don't understand the complexity of the situation, except that this stranger who is yelling at them is now walking toward them with an object that they don't recognize. What do you do when someone goes at you with a bat? Fight or flight. If the dog is cornered, there is no flight. Personally I think this suggestion could get the hound or the person holding the object harmed. JMO.

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Guest sweetpea

It's okay, it's just some growing pains you'll have to work through.

 

Three weeks is not a lot of time, your greyhound is still unsure of his surroundings.

 

I think the idea of having your kids call the dog to them is a good one. That way your hound won't

feel like he needs to define his space as he has been doing, which is what both of the growling/barking instances

feel like to me.

 

Good luck, take a deep breath, it will be fine.

Buzzy

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The best thing for you children to do is not be afraid, I know this is hard, if the dog sense it has been successful with this in stopping the person from walking by the bed, it will continue to do it, some hounds have a space issue, and stopping this comes with time, not using objects for protection, this may teach fear to both parties, be strong, and continue with what you are doing,, I don't bother any dog that is sleeping, grey or non, unless I speek to them first upon approach keep on keeping on, you will fine :)

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Guest tatahills

You are correct, dogs aren't that complex, they don't understand the complexity of the situation, except that this stranger who is yelling at them is now walking toward them with an object that they don't recognize. What do you do when someone goes at you with a bat? Fight or flight. If the dog is cornered, there is no flight. Personally I think this suggestion could get the hound or the person holding the object harmed. JMO.

 

What they do understand is that a confident, in control person is telling them to give up that space. That is something they know and understand told to them in as close to dog language as we can get. The dog wants it.

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

If you are nervous around your hound, and I do understand you would be, why not try muzzling your hound. They can eat, drink, sleep, etc. while wearing a muzzle, and at the same time you dont have to worry about a bite. What will probably happen is your boy will try to rub his muzzle on everything (typical greyhound behavior, they act like the muzzle is the worst thing to ever happen to them). That way your confidence will grow, and your hound will be more responsive to you.

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Guest LindsaySF

I agree with Greyt-dog-lover's posts. It sounds like you guys are doing a good job. Try muzzling him when he lays down, it might make you feel a little more comfortable. :) Did your adoption group give you a kennel muzzle?

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Guest gecko_foot

Hi.

 

We adopted a 2 year old male greyhound about 3 weeks ago. We had some issues with separation anxiety the first week, but that situation has improved. During the first week or so, he growled at my son a couple of times. We weren't sure why and the behavior seemed to stop after my son became more involved in his care (feeding, walking, etc.) However, in the last few days, he has growled and snapped at my son and daughter--one time each. I had advised everyone not to touch him when he was sleeping because of sleep aggression. My daughter was petting his belly while he was awake in his bed and he was loving it. When she would stop, he would reach out to her for more. So, as she was doing this, he suddenly barked and snapped at her. With the growling, we were told to look him in the eye and firmly say "no," but my daughter was nervous and just jumped and moved away. I made eye contact with him and said, "No!" That was a few days ago. Since then, nobody touches him when he is in his bed, even when he is awake and motioning for someone to come pet him. Tonight, my son had been playing with him trying to teach him to bring this toy to him and play fetch. They both seemed to have a great time. A little while later, the dog was in his bed (not sure if he was sleeping or awake), and my son was walking through the room. He was not talking to or looking at the dog. He was just walking by. The dog barked and bared his teeth in a very menacing looking way. Again, my son sort of just screamed and backed up. I was a few feet away in another room and immediately made eye contact with the dog and yelled, "No!."

 

So, I'm confused by the dog's behavior and am unsure of what to do about it. He's really a sweetheart and very affectionate, except for these instances. I would appreciate any advice. I don't want the kids to be afraid of him and I want to end the behavior before it progresses.

 

Thank you.

 

It can be very intimidating when a new dog growls or snaps at you for the first time, and it sounds like you're doing everything right. I think you've gotten enough advice on the situation, so I'll just say good luck and hang in there. :)

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Guest Harry702

I agree with others who have said that 3 weeks is still very early. It takes time and patience to transition most greyhounds into home life. I promise the journey is worth the time and effort.

 

I sympathize with your family about the growling. Our sweet boy has growled at me a few times... mostly in the first 6 months that we had him. He has some space issues, and I was learning his boundaries. He didn't know me or trust me, and I was ignoring his comfort zone (never on purpose... just because I was still getting to know him). After a while, I started to get it. He hasn't growled at me in over a year (we adopted him 2 years ago in April). He's very sweet, and affectionate to me now... and he's relaxed his boundaries with me because, unlike before, he knows and trusts me not to make him feel uncomfortable.

 

I'd give it more time before you (or any family member) approaches the dog on his bed. As others have said, ask him to come to you for affection. After a few more weeks, consider obedience training him (positive reinforcement only/clicker training)... take long walks together... feed him by hand.. all of these methods help build a trusting bond between a dog and a human.

 

Good luck.

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Guest newgreyowner7

Thank you for all of your responses. So far, so good with the growling...no more incidents. The kids have taken to talking to him if he is sleeping before they walk past the bed to wake him up. And, they call him over to them for petting and they've stopped trying to play fetch for now. Also, we're all trying to give him some space, but it's so hard because he's just so sweet. He seems to be doing pretty well this week with being alone too.

 

Here's hoping things continue in this direction. Thanks again.

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Guest Swifthounds

You are correct, dogs aren't that complex, they don't understand the complexity of the situation, except that this stranger who is yelling at them is now walking toward them with an object that they don't recognize. What do you do when someone goes at you with a bat? Fight or flight. If the dog is cornered, there is no flight. Personally I think this suggestion could get the hound or the person holding the object harmed. JMO.

 

What they do understand is that a confident, in control person is telling them to give up that space. That is something they know and understand told to them in as close to dog language as we can get. The dog wants it.

 

I've never used a broom or a tennis racket on a dog of any breed. I use positive training techniques to encourage positive behavior and build the bond with the dog. When a dog trusts and respects you, force isn't necessary. It won't matter one bit how confident you are when you use force on a dog that isn't hesitant to use his teeth.

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Guest smarthound

You have received an interesting mix of suggestions here and it sounds like you’re working through the challenges you’ve had with your newly adopted dog.

 

For the last 10 years, I have been teaching a “kids and dogs” safety seminar for families who are interested in adoption a greyhound through our local group. I thought it might be helpful for you to know about some of the resources we recommend for our families. Here are my favorites:

 

Living with Kids and Dogs . . . Without Losing Your Mind

by Colleen Pelar, CPDT, CDBC

http://www.livingwithkidsanddogs.com/index.html for behavior videos and additional information

 

How to be the Leader of the Pack...And have Your Dog Love You For It

by Patricia B. McConnell Ph.D.

 

Greyhound Gang has an online guide to basics that will help you transition your greyhound to life in the “outside world.”

www.greyhoundgang.com

Look for the Greyhound Guide under “Adopt”

 

Childproofing Your Dog: A complete guide to preparing your dog for the children in your life

by Brian Kilcommons and Sarah Wilson

 

Positive Perspectives: Love Your Dog, Train Your Dog

by Pat B. Miller, Past President, APDT, Association of Pet Dog Trainers

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Guest smarthound

Here's another good resource for learning about communicating with your greyhound.

link

 

ETA: And I agree with greyt_dog_lover - no sticks, please.

Edited by smarthound
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Guest iconsmum

totally agree with greyt_dog_lover

As a qualified, educated, professional dog trainer, I thought, well really just cling to the hope, that most people understand by now that carrying something at a dog -FAR from making you look in control, just makes you look threatening to the dog. If he's busy being wary of you, he's not going to learn a thing, (other than the fact that his you're not to be trusted) A dog needs to bond with an owner so that his owner can teach him to think for himself (read that positive reinforcement,)- this applies to resource guarding, (the bed) toys, etc., which are all common behaviours that have proven and permanent "fixes" that simultaneously teach him. Carrying anything at a dog, whether you intend to touch him or not, is really out-dated old thinking - and actually "tapping" him ?...good grief...

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I might suggest putting a muzzle on him when you are not sure of him in certain situations. This might sound strange but you are not muzzling him for being bad but to remind him to be on his best behavior. We've had a few try to put there muzzles on themselves for whatever reason. Maybe it is like their security blanket.

 

When someone is sleeping in a high traffic area, we slip their muzzle on them. Then if they are stepped on by a two legger or 4 legger there is no real problem. Same thing if too many want to sleep on the same bed. There is room but let each slumber with a muzzle on.

 

Ours can play with the tennis ball and bones with a muzzle on. I think they learned that at the kennel.

Vallerysiggy.jpg

Then God sent the Greyhound to live among man and remember. And when the Day comes,

God will call the Greyhound to give Testament, and God will pass judgment on man.

(Persian Proverb)

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Guest tatahills

totally agree with greyt_dog_lover

As a qualified, educated, professional dog trainer, I thought, well really just cling to the hope, that most people understand by now that carrying something at a dog -FAR from making you look in control, just makes you look threatening to the dog. If he's busy being wary of you, he's not going to learn a thing, (other than the fact that his you're not to be trusted) A dog needs to bond with an owner so that his owner can teach him to think for himself (read that positive reinforcement,)- this applies to resource guarding, (the bed) toys, etc., which are all common behaviours that have proven and permanent "fixes" that simultaneously teach him. Carrying anything at a dog, whether you intend to touch him or not, is really out-dated old thinking - and actually "tapping" him ?...good grief...

 

It works for people since most new dog owners don't have the confidence to approach the dog without sending fear signals. Dogs have teeth so it gives you the confidence that you have something to block the dog if he were to bite. So what's the consequence of a new dog guarding his pillow? Give him space? I believe you own the pillow not the dog, you just let the dog use it. Same with toys, the couch, and anything else. Like I said it's about using a tool. Dogs bond with a person that is confident and when they known their place in the home. Do dogs bond with a pack by the pack giving them space, treats, ear rubs? Please. I really don't see that many helpful replies. I know because I'm the person that gets all these dogs from our group when they bounce back. If the dogs had problems in other homes but not here, what's the difference? It's the person and the environment. Some people like to talk about problems over and over again and really don't want answers. They fulfill their own needs to "rescue" their dog. Greyhounds are very much dogs. They have lived in packs their whole lives. Some of them are in need of someone taking control, others come into a home with no problems.

 

Old fashioned is not always bad. Now a days we want to make the person feel good about themselves instead of teaching the owner that giving the dog what he needs is the important part.

Speak Softly and Carry a big stick@ :lol

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