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New To Greys, Maybe I Made A Mistake


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Guest greydreams

I just got my dog a week ago. At first he was really shy, but the last 2 days he has been really loosening up. I let him sleep with me, and now he growls and barks if I move. I didn't have him muzzled tonight. I am becoming afraid of him. I guess I will not sleep with him and crate him.

I didn't find this forum until after I got him, I wish I had found it before I got him. I muzzle him in the car, when out in the yard, whenever he is loose in the house because of my 2 small dogs, a pug and a yorkie. So it seems he is always muzzled. My adoption coordinator told me maybe not muzzle him when walking or out in public, just control him, because we don't want the public to think they are aggresive. Well, aren't they, if they need to be muzzled and can't be trusted? Doesn't the public need to know the whole truth before they get one? What if someone asks me why I have him muzzled in the yard? I am going to tell them becuase his prey drive is instinct and I don't want any accidents with any animals. Is that ok to tell people? I am so confused right now. I surely don't want anyone, human or dog, getting hurt. Did I make a mistake getting him? He is really a good dog most of the time. I know about the alpha dog thing, I do make him wait until I go out first and all that, speak to him in a firm voice, don't feed him people food or anything like that. Is he just testing me? I am serious about making this work, I love him very much. Help a newbie, please, if you can.

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First things first - no bed or couch privileges for now. They are something to be earned and IMO should only be given once the dog has settled into your household, you're having no behaviour issues, and you have some basic commands in place that will let you get the dog off the furniture.

 

Why are you muzzling him in the yard and car? I suppose it may be a good idea to do it while he is adjusting and you are getting to know each other, but we didn't do that.

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Guest Lovey_Hounds

some dogs can be whats called sleep agressive some times they get over it some times they dont. greyhounds are not used to sleeping with another person/dog and they can get startled and growl.

Did you have a chance to read retired racing greyhounds for dummies? its awsome and very informative!

muzzling at first insn't a bad thing until you get to know your hound and your hound gets to know you and your family including your little furry family.if anyone asks about the muzzle explain your dog isnt mean he just doesnt understand right now what is to go in his mouth and what doesnt and this helps prevent the wrong things from going in :P Do you know if you dog was cat tested through your adoption group? if you are not sure ask them and if he was fostered his foster family may be able to tell you a lot more about your pup.

Edited by Lovey_Hounds
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What area of MN are you in? There are a lot of members here from that area and maybe someone can meet up with you for a play date or just to be available to help you out. Are you in touch with the group? It is a bit late but tomorrow you will get lots of help. :) Hang in there.

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~Beth, with a crazy mixed crew of misfits.
~ Forever and Always missing and loving Steak, Carmen, Ivy, Isis, and Madi.
Don't cry because it's ended, Smile because it happened.
Before you judge me, try to keep an open mind, not everyone likes your taste.

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Guest Greytluv

Two of mine growl and snap at me when they are in bed with me. I just kick them off. I know not to get near them. A stern "NO" from me usually quiets them.

 

Don't get discouraged. You two are just getting to know each other. Did the adoption group tell you that he is okay with little dogs?

 

 

Don't become afraid of him. You will get it all straighten out. They're just big love bugs :inlove

Oh, and welcome :welcome2 to GT. You will love it here and get all your questions answered

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Guest greydreams

I am in Coon Rapids, north suburb of the cities. Yes, he is cat tested, and I took the Yorkie with when we had our 2 hour meet and greet. I didn't take the Pug because she loves everybody, human or animal. Her tail hasn't stopped wagging since Al walked int he door. At the meet and greet, Raja, the Yorkie, was kind of in Al's face at first but settled down. Now Raja just gets barky at Al when food and water are around. So I feed them in seperate rooms and don't leave food out. The trouble is I care take 24/7 for my Mom and she doesn't listen to a word I say, so I have to watch every single second! But I am used to it. I would be all over Raja if I was Al and I ever got the chance for getting in my face like that. lol

 

I did give Al a stern "no" and kicked him out of the bed when he did that. He doesn't get up on the couch, but I did catch him trying to get into my recliner today, lol, it was funny because he is way too big for it so he gave it up.

 

I muzzled him in the truck because he is new and I don't know how he acts in the car yet. We have only been on 2 rides so far, and he did well both times. I have to boost him into the truck, though, he doesn't go in by himself. He rides in the extended cab back seat. Perfect for him. I muzzle him when he is out in the yard because I don't want to forget when I start letting him out with the others. I will take him out on leash at first when they all go out just to get him used to it. He is such a silly boy and gets so excited that he may run the others over by accident out there!

 

There is a meet and greet at the local pet store this coming weekend that I will go to, and some others around the cities that I went to before I adopted to meet a lot of greyhounds and owners. The owners were all so nice and helpful and informative, so I will continue to do that and have them all meet Al and I will be involved with the group I adpoted from.

I think I just paniced a little earlier, I am feeling better about things now. Thanks for the encouraging words.

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I also have little dogs. I know some get along and do well outside with each other, I just am not that trusting. In the house they co-mingle great but I don't allow my little ones out with the greys. I have four greyhounds and only one of them would I trust outside with the littles at all. I have just learned a routine for outdoor time.

 

Take deep breaths, it does get easier. :)

gallery_12867_3348_20333.jpg
~Beth, with a crazy mixed crew of misfits.
~ Forever and Always missing and loving Steak, Carmen, Ivy, Isis, and Madi.
Don't cry because it's ended, Smile because it happened.
Before you judge me, try to keep an open mind, not everyone likes your taste.

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If you muzzle in public, I can suggest that for the short term, you can explain it by saying something like "he's new, and I'm just learning how he'll react to being a pet". I usually explain that newly adopted greyhounds may never have seen a child, or another breed of dog, or (fill in blank), and since greyhounds are used to having muzzles on while they race, using the muzzle is an easy way to find out how Spot will react to all these strange things without taking any chances.

 

Good luck with your new addition ... and pictures please!!!

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Guest IrskasMom

First of all,WELCOME to GT :wave:wave:wave . Relax , Your Adoption Group is there to help you. NO Bed or Couch.His own Bed in Livingroom or Bedroom.Always feed all Dogs seperate and a Babygate is your best Friend for right now. Discuss with your Group about your small Animal's and him.It is all New to him.The Surrounding , you, the other Pups ...everything .Give him and you some Time.BTW we are all here to help you. :grouphug:grouphug:grouphug

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I recommend you read "At the end of the leash" by Patricia McConnell. It will give you a whole lot of insight about dog behaviour. I may have the title slightly incorrect but it is close. Also search for NILF on here and you"ll get a lot of information about training. Talk to your adoption group as well. There's lots of support and information available.

 

Good Luck

Edited by greytpups

Jan with precious pups Emmy (Stormin J Flag) and Simon (Nitro Si). Missing my angels: Bailey Buffetbobleclair 11/11/98-17/12/09; Ben Task Rapid Wave 5/5/02-2/11/15; Brooke Glo's Destroyer 7/09/06-21/06/16 and Katie Crazykatiebug 12/11/06 -21/08/21. My blog about grief The reality is that you will grieve forever. You will not get over the loss of a loved one; you will learn to live with it. You will rebuild yourself around the loss you have suffered. You will be whole again but you will never be the same. Nor should you be the same, nor would you want to. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross

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Guest argolola

Welcome and congratulations on adopting a grey. They are soooooo wonderful.

 

Don't worry, it will get better. Our Lola was perfect in every way when we adopted her. She had been in 2 homes and knew the ropes about everything. Then 5 years later we added Rudy, who was straight off the track. Let me tell you, I was questioning my sanity for a while, but things got easier and now they are great together.

 

Please keep us posted on how it's going. You will all be just fine.

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I understand about the growling/barking in bed--that is no uncommon when the hound is startled by your movement when he's sleeping. Or is he doing this when he's wide awake?

 

But I don't understand the connection between this and muzzling all day in the house, yard, on walks, etc. Has he ever snapped at you or the other dogs during the daytime? Does he do it when you're out walking? Usually, growling/barking/snapping related to sleep has very little to do with the dog's behavior when he is wide awake during the day.

 

One of ours used to snap at us during the night when we moved around. Never actually bit. After a year or so, she settled down. It was part of the adjustment process as she learned to feel secure in our home. She's almost 12 now and sleeps with us most nights, and it's been years since she snapped like that. Also, she never did snap at any other time.

 

I have 4 hounds now, and only one misbehaves on walks--he is leash reactive and snarls, jumps, snaps when he sees another dog, so for safety's sake, I do muzzle him on walks. But that is a more unusual circumstance.

 

It sounds like you are afraid of your new dog. It would help folks here to give you advice if we understand more completely why that is. Take heart~

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Guest BeakerBoy

I just wanted to say that I'm a relatively new grey owner myself (we've had Beaker for three months now), so I totally understand that it can be a bit overwhelming! We've been lucky in that Beaker has no issues with aggression, getting on the furniture, etc. though. However, I am in the Minneapolis area as well-did you get your grey through GPA-MN? That's where we got Beaker and they were great to work with! Now that we've had him for a few months, I want to start taking him to the meet and greets so he gets exposed to other greys more regularly, so if you decide to visit more of them with your grey (or even without him, just to talk to other owners), let me know and perhaps we'll be at the same one! :)

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If he's going to be crabby in bed, I'd put him to sleep in his own nice bed and keep him out of mine.

 

Muzzling: I've never muzzled on walks. I've got the leash, I've got control, right? Only time I might do it is if I lived in a neighborhood with a lot of small, loose dogs and my dog was not small-dog friendly.

 

I muzzle in the house when I can't supervise, and I muzzle in the yard when more than one dog is out at a time. Even with muzzles, I would *always* supervise large and very small dogs outside together.

 

Really wouldn't take into consideration what other people think of greyhounds based on what you do. You adopted a pet, you didn't sign an advertising contract.

 

Hugs and best luck with your new pup!

 

 

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest Swifthounds
I muzzle him in the car, when out in the yard, whenever he is loose in the house because of my 2 small dogs, a pug and a yorkie. So it seems he is always muzzled.

 

Especially in the beginning, this is fine. I treat training tools and comforts as privileges to be earned. I muzzle dogs in the yard and car as a matter of course. If dogs are the same size, then muzzling one means muzzling all. Where you have a greyhound and smaller critters, there's no need to muzzle the little ones.

 

With a new dog, it's a good idea to muzzle in the house as well. I do it religiously for the first few weeks and then taper off over time - good behavior earns less muzzling time. Muzzles, though some dogs are quite overly dramatic (because they know it works and will make you give in to them), don't bother hounds and if your hound trained to race, he's used to muzzles. Look at it this way, the muzzle is a small inconvenience to makes sure that your hound adjusts well and your little ones don't get hurt, even inadvertently. Remember, a greyhound has never lived with small furry things. He doesn't know how they run, how they play, how they react. They smell like dogs, so he knows they're dogs, but they're really funny looking dogs - like they've been in a terrible accident with a shrinking machine.

 

Over time, everyone will settle in together. What you're doing is avoiding any unfortunate mishaps. You've seen how much your hound has come out of his shell in the short time you've had him. Expect lots of changes and boundary testing over the next 6-9 months or so.

 

My adoption coordinator told me maybe not muzzle him when walking or out in public, just control him, because we don't want the public to think they are aggresive. Well, aren't they, if they need to be muzzled and can't be trusted? Doesn't the public need to know the whole truth before they get one? What if someone asks me why I have him muzzled in the yard? I am going to tell them becuase his prey drive is instinct and I don't want any accidents with any animals. Is that ok to tell people? I am so confused right now.

 

Not aggressive. Prey driven perhaps, but not aggressive. Did he test safe with small dogs and cats, or just small dogs?

 

You know, in all the years I've had greyhounds (14+) I've never had a neighbor ask. I have had people ask when I roll up with a car full of muzzled dogs. I tell people that I muzzle in those situations #1 because the muzzled hound is brand new and still adjusting and #2 greyhounds have thin skin.

 

I surely don't want anyone, human or dog, getting hurt. Did I make a mistake getting him? He is really a good dog most of the time. I know about the alpha dog thing, I do make him wait until I go out first and all that, speak to him in a firm voice, don't feed him people food or anything like that. Is he just testing me? I am serious about making this work, I love him very much. Help a newbie, please, if you can.

 

The next 6-9 months or longer will be a combination of him making mistakes in trying to adapt to his strange new environment, and his settling in and testing boundaries. Dogs learn by behaving a way and assessing the results. They test boundaries, so that they learn where those boundaries are. Routines, boundaries, and predictability are what dogs need, but they only have limited ways to discover them - through training, or through making mistakes.

 

First things first - no bed or couch privileges for now. They are something to be earned and IMO should only be given once the dog has settled into your household, you're having no behaviour issues, and you have some basic commands in place that will let you get the dog off the furniture.

 

I wholeheartedly agree here. It's important to remember that a greyhound has never rolled over while sleeping or had someone roll over into him. When he has slept or eaten or played with a toy, it has been in his kennel where no one can impinge on that space. Sharing is a new adjustment. I would not encourage his getting on the beds or furniture until he has a chance to adjust to this change.

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Guest bigbrindlebunny

They don't think of the muzzles as a punishment, it's something they've been using all their lives. In the beginning we had to use the muzzle a lot because Pete started out as non-Grey aggressive (loves everyone from Pitbulls to tea cup size doggies today), and he used to eagerly thrust his head into the muzzle. It meant he was going out. Yipee! These days we only need to use it if he's going to be running around with other Greyhounds.

 

Pete was my first dog, and I'm a first class worrier. I thought I might have made a mistake in getting him for the first 6 months. Thank heavens for my adoption coordinator and the folks here at GT. Be sure to use the search engine and read past threads that may help with stuff you're encountering today. Greyhounds have many of the same track transition issues, afterall their childhoods had a lot in common.... And don't forget to talk things over with your adoption coordinator! I must of driven mine crazy. Be honest with them. The folks that a rescue group allows to act as a coordinator are balanced, practical, experienced owners who want you to be successful. They want to do what's best for the dog, and they've seen it all. They would rather a dog be rehomed than in the wrong place, and they can distinguish between new owner nerves and a real problem.

 

Hope this helps.

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Ek! Not growling at you on YOUR bed! Our girls know that is the carnal mistake! lol Rainy gets growly when Sunshine lays too close or touches her while she is sleeping. I allow that since Sunshine is a bratty puppy that knows no boundries. :rolleyes: We were all cuddling on the bed and I had my arm around Rainy stroking her belly... Sunshine hops up on the bed and plops down hard right on Rainy's back legs. Snarl, growl, snark, whip around with her head is what Rainy did then she remembered that I was in-between Sunshine and her since I was giving belly rubs. She very quickly made eye contact wagged her tail and did a "You know I wasn't growling at YOU Mom, right? Are we still ok?"

 

Growling over a bone, bed, sofa, or anything else, gets that privilege taken away and the hound booted out of the room temporarily. If your too nervous to boot your pup off the bed or sofa a squirt bottle works well along with a verbal "off" I wouldn't allow your hound on YOUR bed for a few months at least. They need to adjust to pet life first and understand that the bed is yours and *if* your feeling nice you might share it with him. ;)

 

I wouldn't muzzle if he's out in the yard by himself. What's he going to do? :lol It's really nice that your using the muzzle as a helpful tool, it's not to be seen as a bad thing. I wouldn't muzzle on walks, but I will also kick any small rude dog that rushes up to us barking and growling. My dogs know I will take care of them and they don't have to. Absolutely muzzle if your hound is in the yard with the two little dogs as a 'just in case.'

 

If your dog is alone in the car w/o the other two dogs I wouldn't muzzle. If I had 2 greyhounds in a car shoved together than yes I would muzzle. It's much cheaper than vet bills if someone snarks because someone else stepped on their foot, etc. The thing skin is something to keep in your mind but don't go overboard with it. They still are dogs. *deep breath*

 

Every time you want to muzzle him just ask yourself what the worst case scenario would be. Then rationalize how likely that is to happen. Then decide whether to muzzle or not.

 

These dogs aren't very aggressive they just are raised with other dogs rather than a bunch of people, so they speak doggie language better than people language. Most domesticated dogs get the gist of human language since they are immersed in humans all the time.

 

The below reading will help you understand how your pup is thinking. If you ever have a freak out and need to talk to someone right away my cell # is 610-800-9693.

 

 

 

 

Of all breeds of dogs, the ex-racing Greyhound has never had to be responsible for anything in his life. His whole existence has been a dog-centered one. This breed has never been asked to do anything for itself, make any decisions or answer any questions. It has been waited on, paw and tail. The only prohibition in a racing

Greyhound's life is not to get into a fight----------------or eat certain stuff in the turn out pen.

 

Let us review a little. From weaning until you go away for schooling, at probably a year and a half, you eat, grow and run around with your siblings. When you go away to begin your racing career, you get your own "apartment," in a large housing development. No one is allowed in your bed but you, and when you are in there, no one can touch you, without plenty of warning.

 

Someone hears a vehicle drive up, or the kennel door being unlocked. The light switches are flipped on. The loud mouths in residence, and there always are some, begin to bark or howl. You are wide awake by the time the human opens your door to turn you out. A Greyhound has never been touched while he was asleep.

 

You eat when you are fed, usually on a strict schedule. No one asks if you are hungry or what you want to eat. You are never told not to eat any food within your reach. No one ever touches your bowl while you are eating. You are not to be disturbed because it is important you clean your plate.

 

You are not asked if you have to "go outside." You are placed in a turn out pen and it isn't long before you get the idea of what you are supposed to do while you are out there. Unless you really get out of hand, you may chase, rough house and put your feet on everyone and every thing else. The only humans you know are the "waiters" who feed you, and the "restroom attendants" who turn you out to go to the bathroom. Respect people? Surely you jest.

 

No one comes into or goes out of your kennel without your knowledge. You are all seeing; all knowing. There are no surprises, day in and day out. The only thing it is ever hoped you will do is win, place or show, and that you don't have much control over. It is in your blood, it is in your heart, it is in your fate-- or it is not.

 

And when it is not, then suddenly you are expected to be a civilized person in a fur coat. But people don't realize you may not even speak English. Some of you don't even know your names, because you didn't need to. You were not asked or told to do anything as an individual; you were always part of the "condo association?; the sorority or fraternity and everyone did everything together, as a group or pack. The only time you did anything as an individual is when you schooled or raced, and even then, You Were Not Alone.

 

In my "mobile abode," the Greyhounds each have several unique names, but they also have a single common name: it is Everybody. We continue to do things as a group, pack or as we are affectionately known in-house, by Kathleen's Husbandit, "The Thundering Herd."

 

Back to those who have not been permanently homed. Suddenly, he is expected to behave himself in places he's never been taught how to act. He is expected to take responsibility for saying when he needs to go outside, to come when he is called, not to get on some or all of the furniture, and to not eat food off counters and tables. He is dropped in a world that is not his, and totally without warning, at that.

 

Almost everything he does is wrong. Suddenly he is a minority. Now he is just a pet. He is unemployed, in a place where people expect him to know the rules and the schedule, even when there aren't any. (How many times have you heard someone say, "He won't tell me when he has to go out." What kind of schedule is that?) Have you heard the joke about the dog who says, "My name is No-No Bad Dog. What's yours?" To me that is not even funny. All the protective barriers are gone. There is no more warning before something happens. There is no more strength in numbers. He wakes up with a monster human face two inches from his. (With some people's breath, this could scare Godzilla.) Why should he not, believe that this "someone," who has crept up on him, isn't going to eat him for lunch? (I really do have to ask you ladies to consider how you would react if someone you barely knew crawled up on you while you were asleep?) No, I will not ask for any male input.

 

Now he is left alone, for the first time in his life, in a strange place, with no idea of what will happen or how long it will be before someone comes to him again. If he is not crated, he may go though walls, windows or over fences, desperately seeking something familiar, something with which to reconnect his life. If he does get free, he will find the familiarity, within himself: the adrenaline high, the wind in his ears, the blood pulsing and racing though his heart once again--until he crashes into a car.

 

Often, the first contact with his new family is punishment, something he's never had before, something he doesn't understand now, especially in the middle of the rest of the chaos. And worst of all, what are the most common human reactions to misbehavior? We live in a violent society, where the answer to any irritation is a slap, punch, kick, whip, or rub your nose in it. Under these circumstances, sometimes I think any successful adoption is a miracle.

 

He is, in effect, expected to have all the manners of at least a six-year old child. But, how many of you would leave an unfamiliar six-year old human alone and loose in your home for hours at a time and not expect to find who knows what when you got back? Consider that if you did, you could be brought up on charges of child abuse, neglect and endangerment. Yet, people do this to Greyhounds and this is often the reason for so many returns.

 

How many dogs have been returned because they did not know how to tell the adoptor when they had to go out? How many for jumping on people, getting on furniture, counter surfing, separation anxiety, or defensive actions due to being startled or hurt (aka growling or biting)? So, let's understand: Sometimes it is the dog's "fault" he cannot fit in. He is not equipped with the social skills of a six-year old human. But with your love and help, you can make it happen.

------

 

Jessica

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Guest 3greysinPA

Sounds like you have gotten tons of greyt advice... so i just wanted to say WELCOME to GT. :welcome .. and dont give up on your houndie.. they are just big Lovebugs ... and need some understanding from you... and some time to adjust to being with you in your home..

You came to the right place to get your questions answered... and to learn more about Greyhounds...Hopefully you can meet up with some experienced people in your area...and then you will feel better about your decisions... and you will know that you are Not alone. :)

and

Hang in there...

Hugs to you and the hound. :wubsite

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Guest greydreams

Thank you all so much for the replys. Yup, I just paniced last night. I feel rather silly now.

I got too anxious and let him sleep with me, and you are all right, he's too new to the home for that. He must be sooo overwhelmed and I just added to that.

I do use baby gates! Big believer in them. I have one for the sunroom where he hangs out, he can see the kitchen and living room from there, he likes being in there and will go there on his own to lay down, just to get away and some time to himself, I think. I only close the gate on that one when I think he wants alone time. One in the entrance to the living room because the front door opens to the front yard, which is not fenced, and I don't want Mom (or anyone else) to accidently let him out. The last one is across the basement stairs, there is no reason for him to go down there, and the Yorkie likes to sneak down there and poop every chance he gets, so this way I can avoid that. The gates all have walk through doors, so that should remind her of the dog when she has to use them.

Alex, Al for short, has never growled or barked except when he was in bed, so I am pretty sure it was the sleep startle thing going on. It just surprised me because he didn't do it for the first 5 nights he slept with me, then all of a sudden it started.

Thanks so much for helping me figure this out and for calming my fears.

I will try and get pictures by this weekend, or over the weekend. Al is a big boy, 72 pounds and he is a beautiful brindle. But they are all so beautiful, aren't they?!? On the application there was a question that asked if I had a preference for a male or female, or color, and I put no, I love them all! Which I do!

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I'm glad to see that someone posted Kathleen Gilly's excellent piece about the adjustment retired track greyhounds go through when they find themselves in a home. Kathleen and Gil tour the nation in their Winnebago with their troupe of "Dancing Greyhounds". If you get a chance to see them up your way make sure you go.

 

Al might as well be on a different planet! His whole life has changed. He doesn't recognize anything. But he is learning fast and he'll be fine.

 

I wouldn't worry too much about the sleep startle growl you got as long as he turned it off as soon as he recognized you. The reawson it took a few days for this to show up is that it took a few days for him to feel relaxed enough to drop into really deep sleep. Then you made the bed bounce and he snapped awake and growled. If it was me I'd let him on the bed again. That's the only way he'll get used to being awakened.

 

As to your midget pups, if Al hasn't shown any aggression, just some confusion trying to figure out what they are, I wouldn't worry too much about them either, as long as they aren't snappy with him.

 

I've had greyhounds since 1962 and I've found that the only way they learn is by doing. If you restrict him too much he will not learn as fast. Just watch him intently.

Paul with Bill & Elmo & angel Happy

in the beautiful Hudson Valley of NY

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Guest Liz_in_PA

I was afraid of my dog for the first month. I was sure this wasn't going to work out. I even asked here "how do I know if it's the right dog?".

 

I didn't understand the growls and grumbles. I would stand up, quaking inside, attempting to use my best Voice of God, and say "get off the sofa". And you know what? It worked. We set some rules between us. No sleeping on the bed unless it's naptime with Momma. At nighttime, they have their own beds. If puppy grumbles at someone, he hears "knock it off." More than that, dog is on the floor. We don't push the dog off, we walk to the kitchen so he thinks there might be a possibility of food and then he's not allowed back up.

 

Have faith and listen to what he's telling you.

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I realize I'm coming to this thread late, but wanted to reinforce the idea that your adoption group will be a fantastic resource for you in these early stages of GH ownership. I am assuming you probably adopted through either GPA-MN or Northern Lights. Both are wonderful groups with very supportive and dedicated volunteers. Your first contact should be your adoption rep. And if you feel you aren't getting the help you need there, or simply want more opinions/advice, you can certainly turn to either (or both) of the local group email lists.

 

Greytalk is also an outstanding resource, and you've received a lot of really good advice here, but I want to make sure you're getting all the local support you need as well. Sometimes being able to meet up with volunteers and other local GH owners in person can make a world of difference in helping you and your dog adjust to this new life together.

 

I see you intend to go to Meet & Greets with your pup. Great idea! I would also suggest, if you're available, joining any group walks in your area. GPA-MN has group walks every week, weather permitting, at Lake Harriet in Mpls, and Como in St. Paul.

 

I am an active volunteer locally, and I am always happy to help new adopters in any way I can. :)

Edited by ZoomDoggy

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~Aimee, with Flower, Alan, Queenie, & Spodee Odee! And forever in my heart: Tipper, Sissy, Chancy, Marla, Dazzle, Alimony, and Boo. This list is too damned long.

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Hello from Wisconsin!

 

I know when I first got our first greyhound, we muzzled him on walks because I was worried about what would happen if we came across a rabbit or a cat or something. He quickly proved that was not an issue and we've never muzzled him on walks since. We didn't with our second one at all, but I remember being worried to death about that same exact thing at first!

 

If he's out in the yard by himself, I don't see any reason for him to be muzzled. With the littler dogs until they get to know each other better, then yes.

 

Our rule of thumb is no bed and couch privileges for new hounds in the house until they realize who is boss and the second we get a growl, they're done with that privilege for quite some time.

 

We don't have small dogs, but we have two cats. The first few days, we muzzled him while the cats were around and then after we knew he wasn't showing any signs of prey drive towards them, we promoted him from the muzzle to just wearing a short leash - he couldn't go anywhere out of that 4 foot radius of us if there was a kitty around. Leashing them and keeping them close also really helps with potty training!

 

I remember spending the first month or two going back and forth from horrified for my kitties safety and all the new precautions and then to joy and excitement about having such a wonderful dog in my home. Now, 6 years later, I can definitely say all the stress of that first month or two is definitely worth it!! It's natural to have your worries and after a bit, they'll fade and you'll feel like he's been part of the family forever!

Forever in my Heart Joe T Greyhound, Charly Bear, Angel Daisy, and Katze & Buzz Kitty.

 

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