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Zero Bit Me Tonight


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Hi,

 

Zero's daddy here. I'm sitting here with a towel on my nose, typing with one hand. My fault I guess. Zero was chillin' on the couch, awake. I was trying to get him off the couch & carry him to my bed where he likes to sleep. I've said in past forums that he is so lazy sometimes that he just pours off the couch. I've picked him up off the couch before many times like this and he has never flinched. Well now he did in a split second and bit my nose. He broke the skin and I have a pretty bad cut on it, though with pressure the bleeding has stopped. Not great way to start the new year :(

 

So, it seems as though Zero's personality has changed quite a bit. As I said in my previous forum he's been pretty much an angel for the past nine months since I first got him. Never chewing anything, staying home 10 hours per day and no problems. As of this Thanksgiving he's chewed up my night guard (tat stops me from grinding my teeth at night), he's figured out how to get into my cabinets in the kitchen, got into my closet in the bathroom and ate a very small empty bottle of Gold Bond talcum powder. I since put baby locks on my cabinets this past week, but Zero has already chewed on one of the cabinet doors while I was out of the house.

 

So greyhound friends, how do I handle this? I guess #1, don't try to get him off the couch by picking him up anymore. To boot, after he bit me I fall backward onto my $300 coffee table, it tipped over and the glass shattered into a million pieces. Again, not a great way to start 2010.

 

Sincerely,

Tony

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I'm so sorry you got bit. I think it's time for some training for Zero. If he is at all food motivated, when you want him off the sofa, hold a little treat out so he can see and smell it, tell him "off" and when he complies to get the treat, treat him and tell him good boy. You might want to practice this so he learns quickly. You can teach him almost any command you wish using this technique.

 

Muzzle him while you're gone. That will stop the chewing. He's used to wearing a muzzle and it will prevent any more damage to your home.

 

Hope your nose heals quickly.

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

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Absolutely, start muzzling him now when you leave.

 

I like Judy's idea about the food to get him to move but you may even want to limit his couch time. :dunno If it was as simple as he was just not ready to get off of the couch or if he got spooked. Either way, he shouldn't be protective of the couch. Mine will all get off the couch or chair with a simple, "down". It took a while but I never grab a collar or nudge them. They move when I say to move. In the beginning it was with food and then later it was me just praising and calling them in a happy, sing song voice so they would be excited to get down. Each time I would always use the word "down" or "off".

 

Good luck and I am sorry that you got bitten.

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~Beth, with a crazy mixed crew of misfits.
~ Forever and Always missing and loving Steak, Carmen, Ivy, Isis, and Madi.
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Guest TeddysMom

Oh My, I am so sorry you got bit. I am guessing that he is feeling that now your house is his. Hopefully with all the good advise from the more knowledgeable greyhound folks, you will be able to get him under control again. Hope your nose heals quickly.

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Guest Lovemyhound

Oh my goodness, I'm so sorry for your accident. I love snuggling my houndies but this is exactly why my pups are not invited onto the furniture. I like the idea of the treat to enourage Zero off the couch OR the once or twice my pups hopped up on my bed to fulfill curiosity, I clipped a leash onto their collar and gave the command - Let's go!

 

Sorry for your nose and your coffee table - best of luck with your pup!

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I'm sorry. I know it more than physically hurts when that happens. but Judy's suggestions are good ones. he needs a reliable command to get off the couch. teaching him with a treat is great. I did with Jilly and she absolutely knows it now for couches, my bed etc. With or without a treat. If there is still hesitation to get off, absolutely a leash and a happy voiced - let's go. Make all this happy even though I know you are not exactly feeling that way right now. And yess use your muzzle for when you are gone for now. It works.grouphug.gif

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Susan, Jessie and Jordy NORTHERN SKY GREYHOUND ADOPTION ASSOCIATION

Jack, in my heart forever March 1999-Nov 21, 2008 My Dancing Queen Jilly with me always and forever Aug 12, 2003-Oct 15, 2010

Joshy I will love you always Aug 1, 2004-Feb 22,2013 Jonah my sweetheart May 2000 - Jan 2015

" You will never need to be alone again. I promise this. As your dog, I will sing this promise to you, and whisper it to you at night, every night, with my breath." Stanley Coren

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This sounds sort of like stupid tax! :lol Like when Chris tried to roll Rainy into a cute roach last week and got a bloody nose for his efforts. :rolleyes: Rainy has never roached in her life and panicked. I never try to physically manipulate my dogs. I'll pick them up if they are hurt or in and out of the tub, but that's it. If I tell them to get off the furniture and they don't listen, which is rare, I get on and body block them off. Another safe way would be to clip a leash to his collar and cheerfully give a "Lets Go"

 

You were trying to be nice and making it so your pupper didn't have to walk into the bedroom, but he most likely just got scared and reacted. ;) That just something my hubby would do too... Glad it minor and your ok! When it comes down to it I don't really like being picked up either and neither do either of our pups.

 

Maybe start with some obedience training? It will give Zero some confidence and let him know a bit more about what's expected of him. Def muzzle while your gone if he's still getting into stuff. Our 2 yr old is always so proud to show us whatever she found during the workday, but we keep anything toxic way out of reach and really don;t have anything valuable. I'm hoping she grows out of it soon! :lol

 

He's just getting comfy in your home and starting to see what fun he can have. :P

------

 

Jessica

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Guest Downtownhoundz

So sorry! Sometimes it's so hard to remember that even though they have such endearing, quirky personalities , they are still dogs and are still prone to dog behavior.I try to always remember this whenever I want mine to do something that invovlves moving them.

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Guest Greytluv

Ouch. Getting bit is no fun. Greyt advice here. I always make sure they are really awake before I approach them. Good luck. And remember the muzzle is your friend :)

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Absolutely, start muzzling him now when you leave.

 

I like Judy's idea about the food to get him to move but you may even want to limit his couch time. :dunno If it was as simple as he was just not ready to get off of the couch or if he got spooked. Either way, he shouldn't be protective of the couch. Mine will all get off the couch or chair with a simple, "down". It took a while but I never grab a collar or nudge them. They move when I say to move. In the beginning it was with food and then later it was me just praising and calling them in a happy, sing song voice so they would be excited to get down. Each time I would always use the word "down" or "off".

 

Good luck and I am sorry that you got bitten.

 

I honestly think I twisted him the wrong way or something when getting him off the couch. It all happened so quickly.

 

I'm sorry. I know it more than physically hurts when that happens. but Judy's suggestions are good ones. he needs a reliable command to get off the couch. teaching him with a treat is great. I did with Jilly and she absolutely knows it now for couches, my bed etc. With or without a treat. If there is still hesitation to get off, absolutely a leash and a happy voiced - let's go. Make all this happy even though I know you are not exactly feeling that way right now. And yess use your muzzle for when you are gone for now. It works.grouphug.gif

 

It totally hurts more mentally. I'm so freaked out that it happened. He's been so mellow, sweet and docile up to this point. This was a complete surprise.

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Hi All,

 

My dog walker recommended I go to the emergency room because of dog bacteria, etc. Three hours later, all is good....well except how I look. I hope I don't get a scar. No stitches. I got a tetanus shot. Doc prescribed Clindamycin and some ointment to put on the wound. As stated before, I'm more mentally wounded than physical pain. Zero gave me a pretty good gash though. I will work with him on this though. A few things I learned. Don't physically manipulate Zero and keep my face away from his. Also, any strangers I will be certain to keep their faces away from his. I'll also work on getting him obedience training. I honestly thought I was doing a really good job over the past ten months raining him, but I'm afraid I babied him too much. Oh well, now we'll just have to work on making him the best doggie on the planet :)

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I don't mean to be insensitive, but before you place the blame on your hound, ask yourself whether something is going on at home, with you, that precipitated the action. Is there a problem with you that your hound is picking up on? Maybe your hound doesn't like sleeping on your bed and prefers the privacy of the couch? Maybe he doesn't like being disturbed and carried to your bed? Maybe he prefers to sleep alone? Hey, maybe, for whatever reasons, he doesn't like sleeping with you? B)

 

So, you lifted him off the couch and he bit you. Not necessarily unreasonable, and not necessarily his fault.

 

One of my hounds goes from the couch to the bed a couple of times during the night. When she comes to bed, she curls up next to me, like Velcro. And then, for whatever reasons, she will go to the couch, roach, and sleep on her back for hours at a time. I have never questioned this activity. Rather, I've considered how many times I'd just like to be alone in bed and stretch out, undisturbed. So, why should I question my hound's desire for the same?

 

You said it yourself in the first paragraph: "My fault I guess." Right! So why look to lay the blame on your hound when you already know it's probably something you did?

 

Obedience training? Muzzling him? Well, if it's not your hound's fault to begin with, wouldn't that only unnecessarily compound the problem?

 

If we first work on making ourselves the best people on the planet, our hounds will likely follow suit ... without instruction or obedience training.

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Ouch! I'm sorry you got bit. Been there, done that.

 

I would think that when you picked him up, one or a combination of the following happened: 1) You startled him 2) You accidentally hurt him or 3) He was defending his space. You've already discovered that picking him up while he's resting is a bad idea, but try not to approach him at all until you're sure that he's well and truly awake and cognizant. Many dogs, not just greyhounds, react badly when they're approached and/or handled while they're sleeping or resting. Imagine you were sleeping in your bed and all of a sudden someone grabbed you. You'd freak out, hit them in the face and then ask questions later. Maybe it was someone you loved and trusted and you feel bad for hitting them, but how were you supposed to know? Yes, it hurts as much emotionally as it does physically when your dog bites you, but try not to take it too personally. It truly sounds as if Zero didn't mean to hurt you. He was startled and acted on a reflex. If you feel that he was defending the couch, then he needs to stay off the couch until he learns who it belongs to, but that doesn't sound like what happened.

 

You might try confining him to one area of the house that's dog proofed when you leave so that he doesn't get into things he shouldn't. Muzzling him when you're not home will keep him from chewing cabinets, etc. This may be a silly question, but do you give him chewies or chew toys on a regular basis? Dogs love to chew, and if they aren't given something appropriate to chew on they'll find something inappropriate instead. Not only is this frustrating for you, but it can be dangerous for him.

Kristen with

Penguin (L the Penguin) Flying Penske x L Alysana

Costarring The Fabulous Felines: Squeak, Merlin, Bailey & Mystic

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Firstly, I'm sorry you got bitten.

 

I do tend to agree that you may have inadvertently hurt Zero when you tried to lift him off the couch. They are so bony and heavy that's it would be easy to hurt them without meaning to and you just never know if they've got a bit of a sore back/neck/leg whatever anyway. The only time Sunny almost bit me was when he had a neck problem that hadn't yet been diagnosed. To be honest, if one of my dogs went to bite me, pain would be the first thing I'd consider, before I considered any "behavioural" issues.

 

The other thing that occurs to me is that maybe Zero's hungry and/or bored and that's why he's going around the house trying to find things to eat whilst you're out? I assume he has a meal before you leave, but 10 hours is a very long time to be left, and maybe instead of muzzling him you could leave several filled kongs (some frozen some not) around the house and maybe a chewy bar or two (the safer ones made out of compressed chopped rawhide for example) to keep him occupied and take the edge off his hunger.

 

I agree with using cheese to get him off the sofa rather than manhandling him. In our house, our dogs sleep in the bedroom with us and we have a little bedroom routine which involves the dogs getting a big, tasty bedtime biscuit just before lights out. The dogs love these biscuits and know that they only get them when they're lying on their beds in the bedroom so we find that the dogs watch us very carefully at bedtime and when they see us getting ready for bed they put themselves on their beds without being asked and expectantly await their biscuits. No fuss at all.

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When a relationship of love is disrupted, the relationship does not cease. The love continues; therefore, the relationship continues. The work of grief is to reconcile and redeem life to a different love relationship. ~ W Scott Lineberry

Always Greyhounds Home Boarding and Greyhounds With Love House Sitting

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Many greyhounds can sleep with their eyes wide open - you might have thought that Zero was awake, when he was actually zoned out or sleeping & you started him awake. If that was the case, who knows what he could have been dreaming about when you tried to pick him up. It was a instinctual self-preservation reaction on his part when he snapped at you, and made contact.

 

I've been bitten almost in the same way, you learn to talk to a dog before you touch them if there is any possibility that the dog could be zoned out or sleeping.

 

Greyhounds are unique in the dog world, but when it comes down to it - they are dogs. They still need training and they need the respect that you would give any other dog.

 

I think that you both might benefit from a basic training class - when you tell Zero to get off of the couch and go to bed, he should jump down and go into the other room. A bit of formal training will bring you closer together and teach Zero to look to you for direction. Classes would give you something fun to do together over the winter months too.

 

 

It sounds like Zero is a bit bored, since he is now trying to find ways to entertain himself in your house.

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Ouch!

 

Well, I think you already know--this is pretty much a mistake/accident, and not an "attack."

 

There is no reason for you to cater to your hound. A healthy Greyhound doesn't EVER need to be carried. He's not a pocket pet; I understand you might be physically strong enough to do it, and it's kinda cute, but what's the message here?

 

Sounds to me as if he's comfortable enough at home, and with you, to be taking over.

 

George continued to change for over a year when I got him.

 

Time to get back to basics!

 

Susan L. had some good advise (which I myself need to heed) about teaching a command that means "get off the couch." My guy will growl at me if I attempt to physically manipulate him; I don't put up with it (harsh tones follow!) nor do I pick at him. We each need to learn that our particular behavior is unacceptable!

 

I applaud you for seeming to recognize that this is not the end of the world.

 

I hope you're cut isn't too bad.


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Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

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Guest greytgrandma

so sorry you got bit. :grouphug

Hot Rod doesnt like to be picked up. The only time Josh picks him up is to put him in the bathtub.Poor baby always looks so pathetic when he has to be picked up.

If I need to move him when hes laying down I just do the happy voice "lets get up" and if he is being terribly lazy( which happens quite often :lol )all I have to do is quickly walk out of the room and he is up and right behind me, heaven forbid I go to another room without him :rolleyes:

He only gets on the couch when Josh isnt home and he never gets on the couch when he is here.But he is never left alone when he is here,I imagine he would sneek up there if we left him here alone.

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Remember, as much as we love them, they are still animals and trouble may follow if we try to project our human behaviour on them. I always think of my pups as 2 y/o children and whatever I would do to keep a 2 y/o child safe, I also do for my pups. I'm referring to safety only here, not human behaviour (hope this isn't confusing!)

 

Remember we are the human and they are the dog. This was not his fault. Also remember, dogs live in the moment so he is long past that moment...you are the one who is dwelling on it. I also suggest reading or rereading info on NILF. Do a search because there's lots of good info on here (see Giselle's posts).

 

Good luck...he's still a greyt dog. Think of this as an opportunity to become a really greyt greyhound owner and move forward armed with lots of good info. btw a good dog is a tired dog. don't forget the exercise.

 

Hope this helps!

Edited by greytpups

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Guest SusanP

We pretty much let our hounds decide where they want to sleep--they know how to get up and walk if they change their minds, and none of them is wild about being carried. I am very unwilling to lift a dog up from a reclining position. They may tolerate it when they are standing, but most of my guys seem very disturbed when we even move them over a few inches while they are lying down, and if we have to do it, we do it with great care.

 

You mention a lot of changes rather recently in this guy's behavior. I do wonder if something has changed in his routine or health? Is he getting less exercise due to weather, or less time outside, leading to boredom chewing indoors?

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I agree with GeorgeofNE--I don't recall any other posts on this forum where folks routinely carried their hounds unless the dog was sick or disabled. (Or, as a last resort, a newby who couldn't navigate stairs.)

 

This might be a good time to look at all of Zero's routines, just to re-evaluate for safety--his and yours.

 

Zero is an awesome hound. I'm sure the two of you will work this through, as you have in the past. I'm sorry you are going through this. Not a good way to start the new year.

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Guest SoulsMom

Just a thought . . . .could he be in pain anywhere and when you picked him up it hurt?

 

I guess I am so used to Archie, who has been a fear 'biter' all his life (and I put biter in quotes because he's never really bitten, just snapped out of fear), that I never, ever touch a dog until I know they are really, truly awake. If I need them to wake up and move I just continue talking to them until they do it . . . .

 

I'm sorry this happened :( I know it's got to hurt in more ways than one. And if I'm going to be honest I expect it will happen to me someday too. Soul likes to snuggle so close to my face when we are sleeping that it is certainly a possibility

 

And your poor table! :o

Edited by SoulsMom
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Not much to add except I'm really sorry you got hurt and squished your coffee table.

 

My first greyhound had sleep startle -- he would occasionally startle awake with a huge snarl and snap -- so I got trained early :lol . I follow approx. Judy's procedure. When I want to move a dog who is lying down and doesn't wanna and doesn't know our command yet, I put a nice treat in my pocket, clip leash on, turn away from dog, and say cheerfully, "Let's go!" "Good boy!" and treat when dog gets up and follows me. Leash because it keeps the person away from the sharp end of the dog.

 

All kinds of people here pick up their greyhounds. Gotta be at least one picture a week in Cute & Funny. Yeah, they're not pocket pets, but they're cute and snuggly and slumbrous. Could be that as Zero has settled in to your house, he's sleeping more deeply; could be he got startled just this once; could be a dozen things. Wouldn't overworry unless you see other signs of crabbiness or pain.

 

The "getting in to things" issue is likely just winter. Weather's not as good for expending energy outside, walks tend to be shorter, etc., so dog has some extra energy to expend inside, eek!

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From reading your post it seems to me that Zero has now become quite comfortable in your home (which is a good thing) but now thinks he owns it. I would suggest no couch or furniture priviledges. I would also suggest an obedience class & Nothing in Life is Free. I had to practice this with Zim for over a year before things settled down here. Zim is also the type of dog that you have to exchange (ie bribe) with food to get her to do certain things. I only physically move her if she is muzzled - she will bite.

I know how upsetting this can be.

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Guest KennelMom

I'm sorry you got bitten, but I hope you approach this as a learning opportunity and don't hold it against Zero. It's cute and funny when the dog is "so lazy" that you slide or pick them up off the sofa instead of telling them to get off the sofa and them respecting your authority. Not so cute and funny when we pay the price for something that was probably a really bad ides for us to be doing in the first place. There is absolutely no reason for you to be picking up your greyhound off the sofa. It's inappropriate from the dog's point of view and these dogs are so bony and awkwardly built, they are not designed for that kind of handling.

 

Sounds like you tweaked him just wrong enough that something hurt or he got scare/unsure...or maybe he's just been tolerating it all this time and finally had enough and decided to put you in your place (in his eyes). Your dog has legs and he knows how to use them. If you want him off the sofa and he's not getting off, it's not because he's lazy...it's because he's choosing to ignore you. And THAT is the problem. Pushing him off or lifting him off was just a band-aid...and a dangerous one at that. You could have been seriously injured with a dog bite to the face and falling through your table (ouch!!! and what a mess, I imagine).

 

Muzzle him when you leave to try to curb the destruction and perhaps try to increase his exercise if at all possible. Did you ever crate him? If so, how did he tolerate it? I think you need a little bit of NILIF and do a little reading to learn to understand your dog. The Other End of the Leash is an excellent book and quick read. We need to understand our dogs and set them up to succeed.

Edited by KennelMom
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I don't mean to be insensitive, but before you place the blame on your hound, ask yourself whether something is going on at home, with you, that precipitated the action. Is there a problem with you that your hound is picking up on? Maybe your hound doesn't like sleeping on your bed and prefers the privacy of the couch? Maybe he doesn't like being disturbed and carried to your bed? Maybe he prefers to sleep alone? Hey, maybe, for whatever reasons, he doesn't like sleeping with you? B)

 

So, you lifted him off the couch and he bit you. Not necessarily unreasonable, and not necessarily his fault.

 

One of my hounds goes from the couch to the bed a couple of times during the night. When she comes to bed, she curls up next to me, like Velcro. And then, for whatever reasons, she will go to the couch, roach, and sleep on her back for hours at a time. I have never questioned this activity. Rather, I've considered how many times I'd just like to be alone in bed and stretch out, undisturbed. So, why should I question my hound's desire for the same?

 

You said it yourself in the first paragraph: "My fault I guess." Right! So why look to lay the blame on your hound when you already know it's probably something you did?

 

Obedience training? Muzzling him? Well, if it's not your hound's fault to begin with, wouldn't that only unnecessarily compound the problem?

 

If we first work on making ourselves the best people on the planet, our hounds will likely follow suit ... without instruction or obedience training.

 

I didn't blame it on the hound, I said "My fault I guess", at no time did I blame him

 

Ouch! I'm sorry you got bit. Been there, done that.

 

I would think that when you picked him up, one or a combination of the following happened: 1) You startled him 2) You accidentally hurt him or 3) He was defending his space. You've already discovered that picking him up while he's resting is a bad idea, but try not to approach him at all until you're sure that he's well and truly awake and cognizant. Many dogs, not just greyhounds, react badly when they're approached and/or handled while they're sleeping or resting. Imagine you were sleeping in your bed and all of a sudden someone grabbed you. You'd freak out, hit them in the face and then ask questions later. Maybe it was someone you loved and trusted and you feel bad for hitting them, but how were you supposed to know? Yes, it hurts as much emotionally as it does physically when your dog bites you, but try not to take it too personally. It truly sounds as if Zero didn't mean to hurt you. He was startled and acted on a reflex. If you feel that he was defending the couch, then he needs to stay off the couch until he learns who it belongs to, but that doesn't sound like what happened.

 

You might try confining him to one area of the house that's dog proofed when you leave so that he doesn't get into things he shouldn't. Muzzling him when you're not home will keep him from chewing cabinets, etc. This may be a silly question, but do you give him chewies or chew toys on a regular basis? Dogs love to chew, and if they aren't given something appropriate to chew on they'll find something inappropriate instead. Not only is this frustrating for you, but it can be dangerous for him.

 

I think it was a combination of he didn't want to get off the couch along with I twisted him the wrong way. I think more that I twisted him the wrong way.

 

Ouch! I'm sorry you got bit. Been there, done that.

 

I would think that when you picked him up, one or a combination of the following happened: 1) You startled him 2) You accidentally hurt him or 3) He was defending his space. You've already discovered that picking him up while he's resting is a bad idea, but try not to approach him at all until you're sure that he's well and truly awake and cognizant. Many dogs, not just greyhounds, react badly when they're approached and/or handled while they're sleeping or resting. Imagine you were sleeping in your bed and all of a sudden someone grabbed you. You'd freak out, hit them in the face and then ask questions later. Maybe it was someone you loved and trusted and you feel bad for hitting them, but how were you supposed to know? Yes, it hurts as much emotionally as it does physically when your dog bites you, but try not to take it too personally. It truly sounds as if Zero didn't mean to hurt you. He was startled and acted on a reflex. If you feel that he was defending the couch, then he needs to stay off the couch until he learns who it belongs to, but that doesn't sound like what happened.

 

You might try confining him to one area of the house that's dog proofed when you leave so that he doesn't get into things he shouldn't. Muzzling him when you're not home will keep him from chewing cabinets, etc. This may be a silly question, but do you give him chewies or chew toys on a regular basis? Dogs love to chew, and if they aren't given something appropriate to chew on they'll find something inappropriate instead. Not only is this frustrating for you, but it can be dangerous for him.

 

Yup, give him two different squeaky toys every morning before I go to work. Every day I swap them out with different ones. He has a Nylabone & I also clean out his Kong & put about 1 tbs natural peanut butter & a handful of food in there. I also leave the TV on as well. Thanks for your response :)

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