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Raw Feeding Basics

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Unless they're straining, firm is fine. If they're straining, then a bit of tripe, heart, or other organ fed along with your turkey drum will help next time. For some dogs, eggs help too.


CAMP GREYHOUND

Tempo (Keep the Tempo), Nora (Road Noise) & Gabe the babe (Gable Habenero), Cooper (Uncle Bud's Coop), Topper (Red Top), & Galgos Lisette & Manolito. Missing our beloved angels Cody (Kiowa My Dodie), Lou (Cantankerous Lou), Romi (FingerRoll), Connie (Devie's Concord), Millie (Djays Overhaul), Bailey (Hallo Forty nine), Andy (Iza Handy Boy, and Rocco (Ripley Rocco), Gracie (VS Megan), Eragon the Longdog, Joey (WJS Flashfire), Roy (Folly and Glory)

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Unless they're straining, firm is fine. If they're straining, then a bit of tripe, heart, or other organ fed along with your turkey drum will help next time. For some dogs, eggs help too.

 

Ya, Kasey is straining, Ryder isn't as bad. I'll remember that for next time. I think all the bone might finally be out of their system now.....we'll see what I find on our walk this morning!


Proudly owned by:
10 year old "Ryder" CR Redman Gotcha May 2010
12.5 year old Angel "Kasey" Goodbye Kasey Gotcha July 2005-Aug 1, 2015

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Guest Swifthounds

The trick if they're straining a bit is too just increase the meaty meat a bit for the next meal and the next, unless you know the dog is fine with an all meat meal. Eventually you'll get a "feel" for managing the bone content. If you notice straining before it becomes real constipation, it's not a big deal. Where people get in trouble is if they don't notice it immediately, or if they immediately feed a no bone meal to "move things along" - often that gets you constipation with the urgency of the big D behind it.

 

Once they've adjusted, most dogs can have a high bone content meal with a boneless meat the day before and/or the day after with no issue.

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The trick if they're straining a bit is too just increase the meaty meat a bit for the next meal and the next, unless you know the dog is fine with an all meat meal. Eventually you'll get a "feel" for managing the bone content. If you notice straining before it becomes real constipation, it's not a big deal. Where people get in trouble is if they don't notice it immediately, or if they immediately feed a no bone meal to "move things along" - often that gets you constipation with the urgency of the big D behind it.

 

Once they've adjusted, most dogs can have a high bone content meal with a boneless meat the day before and/or the day after with no issue.

 

Thanks. They've been having boneless meals since the Turkey drums on Tues evening. This morning's poop was better for Kasey. Now I know it takes at least 2 days for a drum to clear their system.


Proudly owned by:
10 year old "Ryder" CR Redman Gotcha May 2010
12.5 year old Angel "Kasey" Goodbye Kasey Gotcha July 2005-Aug 1, 2015

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Guest greyhound9797

After reading of several new raw feeders frustrations with getting either conflicting answers from the forum or perceived implications that they are either not a good pet parent or irresponsible, I thought that we could all benefit from a "formal" mentors list.

 

The purpose of the list, and the responsibilities of the people on it, is for less experienced raw feeders to connect with experienced ones to ask questions. They can be simple and basic or complex inquiries but please keep in mind - THIS LIST AND THE INFORMATION YOU RECEIVE FROM THE PEOPLE ON IT DOES NOT REPLACE THE ADVICE OF AN EXPERIENCED AND EDUCATED VETERINARIAN. Sorry for the "shouting" but I want to make sure that everyone understands that nobody here is an expert; we may have some extremely experienced people but that does not mean that what they tell you should replace the advice and instructions from a professional veterinarian. Also keep in mind that contacting your mentor does not mean that you are not encouraged to ask questions or post comments in the forum; it is simply a way for people to connect one on, either via phone or email, to assist each other.

 

The list will be comprised of people that currently feed raw and have for at least one year (an experienced feeder) and those that are new to raw or are strongly considering switching to raw. If you are "anti-raw" or simply want to "educate" others on the "dangers of raw feeding" please do not respond to this post or contact me. Having a collection of people who truly want to help others is important. So....

 

If you are an experienced raw feeder who would like to be a mentor to a new raw feeder OR If you are new to raw or thinking of switching - send me an email with the appropriate subject line - "I'm an Experienced Raw Feeder" OR "I Need a Raw Feeding Mentor"

 

In your email please include:

Your first name

Your location (City and State)

Your preferred method of contact (Email and/or Phone Number)

How long you have been feeding raw

The type and number of pet(s) you have fed raw

Any other information you would like to share

 

I will create a list and add to it on a regular basis as more people submit their information. Based on the info I collect I will match up new feeders to experienced feeders based on their level of experience and location. Please remember to respect other forum members privacy and do not share the personal information you receive with others. If you want your name to be removed at any time let me know and I will do it.

 

I really think this will be a great resource to help members of the forum!

 

 

Sandra in FL (Self-Confessed Raw Feeding Junkie)

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Guest GracieGreysMama

I would really love to get our Gracie on raw I like the frankenprey approach because its better for their teeth and more entertaining for the dog . But, my husband is afraid to give her chicken bones. Is this a reasonable concern or given their size is it a non-issue? Have any of you ever had problems with bones splintering or is this only a problem when the chicken had been cooked ?

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Guest KennelMom

I would really love to get our Gracie on raw I like the frankenprey approach because its better for their teeth and more entertaining for the dog . But, my husband is afraid to give her chicken bones. Is this a reasonable concern or given their size is it a non-issue? Have any of you ever had problems with bones splintering or is this only a problem when the chicken had been cooked ?

 

Splintering is a cooked bone concern.

 

We feed raw chicken (and bones) to 18 dogs every day...that's about 190 lbs of raw chicken a week. We've been off and on raw over the years, but chicken has been our staple meat/bone source, with beef meat, tripe, heart, liver and chicken organs as supplemental staples. That's a lot of meals with chicken bones. We've never had an issue with chicken bones except in the very beginning of switching to raw, we have one dog that is pretty sensitive to bone:meat ratio and can get backed up pretty easily.

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Guest ravenchilde

We feed bison w/ bone in patty form, and raw chicken backs. It's fun to watch our little grey girl crunch through a carcass. Reminds you that you have a carnivore on your hands (even if an opportunistic eater).

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I started Otis on raw on his firt day home and everything is doing perfectly! He loves it! My previous grey Tuffy was not really a chewer, he was really picky on everything.. but Otis is a true carnivor ;)

 

wanted to know what I could give Otis to help his bad breath... His teeth are ok, no bad teeth and were cleaned when he was neutered 1 1/2 month ago, before adoption...


siggy2_zpsfb2ddd63.jpg
Our first greyhound, Tuffy: You will always be there with us my angel!
Tuffy greyhound-data
Otis greyhound-data Abbey greyhound-data
"When you open your minds to the impossible, sometimes you find the truth." W.Bishop

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Guest greyhound9797

I started Otis on raw on his firt day home and everything is doing perfectly! He loves it! My previous grey Tuffy was not really a chewer, he was really picky on everything.. but Otis is a true carnivor ;)

 

wanted to know what I could give Otis to help his bad breath... His teeth are ok, no bad teeth and were cleaned when he was neutered 1 1/2 month ago, before adoption...

Good for Otis and you! There isn't anything that really cures bad breath but regular brushing definitely help. What you smell is bacteria in the mouth and it will just increase the longer you go between dentals. Since his teeth were just cleaned your best bet is to start brushing now. To get the benefit it needs to be done more than once a month or once a week. Think about our own dental care - if we only brushed once a week nobody would come near us! ;)

 

Good luck to you and Otis!

 

Sandra

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thanks Sandra!

we will start brushing Otis teeth ;)

 

I started giving Otis capon necks and chicken legs last week-end, he loves it! crouch crouch crouch and they are all gone ;)

I want to add new protein source since chicken is doing good...

what else can I try first?


siggy2_zpsfb2ddd63.jpg
Our first greyhound, Tuffy: You will always be there with us my angel!
Tuffy greyhound-data
Otis greyhound-data Abbey greyhound-data
"When you open your minds to the impossible, sometimes you find the truth." W.Bishop

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Guest greyhound9797

I started giving Otis capon necks and chicken legs last week-end, he loves it! crouch crouch crouch and they are all gone ;)

I want to add new protein source since chicken is doing good... what else can I try first?

Is Otis getting just necks and legs or is he getting boneless meals as well? If it's only been one week for the new diet I would wait another week just to be sure he's tolerating it well then slowly add in a new protein. Pork cuts, usually boneless, can be quite inexpensive and are popular with my grey. I buy whole pork picnics/shoulder/butt when they're on sale and trim off the skin and fat.

 

Sandra

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I ussually feed chicken leg or necks for breakfast and the evening meal is grounded chicken (cacasses, I buy them at my butcher, they ground them up and freeze them in blocks) with giblets (1/4 cup mix of: chicken hearts, beef liver, chicken gizards, pork hearts) plus yogourt, egg, salmon oil and tree-four times a week I add veggies.


siggy2_zpsfb2ddd63.jpg
Our first greyhound, Tuffy: You will always be there with us my angel!
Tuffy greyhound-data
Otis greyhound-data Abbey greyhound-data
"When you open your minds to the impossible, sometimes you find the truth." W.Bishop

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Guest Swifthounds

I ussually feed chicken leg or necks for breakfast and the evening meal is grounded chicken (cacasses, I buy them at my butcher, they ground them up and freeze them in blocks) with giblets (1/4 cup mix of: chicken hearts, beef liver, chicken gizards, pork hearts) plus yogourt, egg, salmon oil and tree-four times a week I add veggies.

 

You don't need the veggies or the yogurt. I would keep a close eye on the amount of bone you're feeding and watch out for chalky stools. For most raw fed dogs that going to be way too much bone (though in the beginning a bit extra can ward off loose stools). I would at the least add in some more boneless meat slowly.

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Hello fellow raw feeders! (I did not want to start a other topic...)

 

this morning Otis puke a little bile with a small part of chicken bone (the knee cap piece??)

I draw on this pic what he puke:

chicken_drumstick.jpg

 

Otis is acting normal, poop ok this morning, eat his breakfast ok...

 

are your raw fed grey pukes sometimes?


siggy2_zpsfb2ddd63.jpg
Our first greyhound, Tuffy: You will always be there with us my angel!
Tuffy greyhound-data
Otis greyhound-data Abbey greyhound-data
"When you open your minds to the impossible, sometimes you find the truth." W.Bishop

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Guest Swifthounds

That's a thicker portion of bone and cartilage. With a piece that small to begin with (too small for a greyhound sized dog - a leg quarter is closer to what you want) they get lazy, don't chomp, and just swallow. It's not uncommon for those to come back up. No worries.

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thanks!

 

do you cut that part out before giving a drumstisk?

 

yes sometimes I can't help be worried watching Otis chew the chicken parts... :blink: seems parts are still big when he swallow them.. ;)


siggy2_zpsfb2ddd63.jpg
Our first greyhound, Tuffy: You will always be there with us my angel!
Tuffy greyhound-data
Otis greyhound-data Abbey greyhound-data
"When you open your minds to the impossible, sometimes you find the truth." W.Bishop

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Guest Swifthounds

do you cut that part out before giving a drumstisk?

 

No, you offer a leg quarter (a drumstick with a thigh still attached) so they have to do more work and they will do more chomping. A drumstick is a good size for a 10-20# dog. Fed to a dog larger than that, they become two chomp and swallow, which increases choking risks as well as making for larger pieces that are harder to diest. the rule of thumb is to feed a dog pieces of food at least as large as the dog's head.

 

No matter what you feed, you'll occasionally get horking up of undigested parts like the end of a drumstick.

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Guest k85trb

Hi all,

I'm new to raw feeding - we're about 3 weeks in. Diesel's been doing fine with it - some picky eating. His favourite is definitely beef, anything beef. So far he's had boneless beef, beef heart, beef neck, chicken neck/back, tripe and lamb neck. (He refused to eat the lamb). No raw organs yet, he does get cooked liver as training treats. Should I include the cooked liver as part of his organ allotment?

 

I'm currently giving him 2 meals a day - containing 6 oz of chicken necks, and the remainder of either beef heart/boneless beef/tripe; To a total of 1 lb. per meal, 2 lb. per day. (2.5% of his ideal weight of 80 lb.) So far he's gained 1 lb. in the 3 weeks bringing him up to 78 lb. I'm worried that 12 oz of chicken neck/backs is too much bone on a daily basis, but his stools are good, not too hard or brittle. How much flexibility is there in the 80/10/10 goal?

 

Thanks in advance for you help,

Tina & Diesel

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Guest greyhound9797

I'm new to raw feeding - we're about 3 weeks in. Diesel's been doing fine with it - some picky eating. His favourite is definitely beef, anything beef. So far he's had boneless beef, beef heart, beef neck, chicken neck/back, tripe and lamb neck. (He refused to eat the lamb). No raw organs yet, he does get cooked liver as training treats. Should I include the cooked liver as part of his organ allotment?

Welcome to the wonderful world of raw feeding! I'm glad Diesel's been doing find but it sounds like you're going a bit fast with so many new things in such a short period of time. As long as he isn't having any stomach upset or other problems, I guess it's not as bad as it sounds but typically you start out very slowly when adding new proteins. Typically you wait 10-14 days before adding a new one but Diesel's had 3 in 3 weeks?

 

Any food your dog eats needs to be included in the daily amounts. Some people feed chicken necks as treats vs as part of a meal so that needs to be figured in. Even if you're cooking the liver I would still include it. How many treats does he get per day?

 

I'm currently giving him 2 meals a day - containing 6 oz of chicken necks, and the remainder of either beef heart/boneless beef/tripe; To a total of 1 lb. per meal, 2 lb. per day. (2.5% of his ideal weight of 80 lb.) So far he's gained 1 lb. in the 3 weeks bringing him up to 78 lb. I'm worried that 12 oz of chicken neck/backs is too much bone on a daily basis, but his stools are good, not too hard or brittle. How much flexibility is there in the 80/10/10 goal?

Was Diesel too thin at 77 pounds and that's why you're feeding 2.5% of 80 pounds as an ideal weight? As with anything, if you give too much then scale back. Nothing about the raw diet is set in stone, it's ALL flexible based on your dogs needs.

 

You're feeding way, and I mean WAY, too much bone. 2 lbs = 32 ounces. If he is to get 10% edible bone then he should only be getting 3.2 ounces of bone per day and you're feeding 4 times that! I'm surprised that he's gained weight with that much bone and such little meat and that his stools are fine. I would increase the meat and decrease the bone gradually, say over 4-5 days or so.

 

It may be helpful to print out the guidelines and have them handy when it comes to mealtime to ensure that you're feeding the proper ratios. Also, save the USDA calculator to your favorites (or have one handy). It's great that you've ventured down this path with Diesel and with a bit of time, raw feeding will become second nature. I bet he appreciates his new yummy food!

 

Sandra

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Guest Swifthounds

:nod

 

Some dog's require mire than the 10% bone initially for stool consistency, but not for nutrition. Twice that amount is by uncommon in the beginning, but 4 times or so is way too much.

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I have tried feeding Ben and Brooke raw turkey necks, beef, chicken, and pork. I've introduced small amounts at a time, usually on top of their kibble. They both get the big D for a day or two after. Ben is much worse than Brooke. If they ate raw at the track and were fine, does anyone have any idea why they get the big D each and every time I've fed them?


Jan with precious pups Katie Crazykatiebug, Emmy (Stormin J Flag) and Simon (Nitro Si) Missing my angels: Bailey Buffetbobleclair 11/11/98-17/12/09; Ben Task Rapid Wave 5/5/02-2/11/15; and Brooke Glo's Destroyer 7/09/06-21/06/16. My blog about grief The reality is that you will grieve forever. You will not get over the loss of a loved one; you will learn to live with it. You will heal and you will rebuild yourself around the loss you have suffered. You will be whole again but you will never be the same. Nor should you be the same, nor would you want to. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross

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Guest KennelMom

Dogs fed kibble will have a different gut flora than a raw fed dog. You introduce an entirely new type of food (raw) into a kibble fed dog and there's usually going to be an adjustment period as their body adapts. Extra bone when you start out will help mitigate this as bone helps to firm up stool. Plus, raw food typically carries with it different bacteria than kibble does, so that can upset their gut flora.

 

I've never mixed raw and kibble in the same meal, but I've read that b/c they digest at different rates, digestion can be upset. You would typically feed kibble in one meal, raw/whole foods in another.

 

We've always cold switched dogs and always had flagyl on hand for anyone who really needed it (rare).

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Does anyone know how to correlate the weight of freeze dried liver to raw liver? In other words, if the goal is 6 oz of raw liver, how much freeze dried would that be (given that freeze dried seems to be essentially weightless :lol )

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