Jump to content

Does This Sound Right,


Recommended Posts

Let me first start off by saying, if any of my pets need veterinary care they get it, no matter the cost.

 

For the last few weeks both dogs have had loose stool off and on. It all started when i gave the salmon skin and the liquid from the can. I did everything that has been suggested for an upset stomach and for the last week both dogs have been ok. Then yesterday they both developed the Big D again. I phoned the vet and asked if I could just drop off a stool sample to test to see if they had worms or some kind of stomach bug. They said I could but even if they found something in the stool I would need to bring them both in for a full exam to get the meds.

 

Both dogs have been to the vets within the last 3 months. Wally has regular blood work done to monitor a calcium deficiency and Hobbes just had a dental with a full blood panel. It's not like it's been years seen they have seen the vet, so it seems to me they just want the money. What are your thoughts?

 

Edited to add,

 

Both dogs are eating, drinking and are acting normally.

Edited by greytluck

Hobbes-Ricard Hatch09/23/99-12/21/09 Always loved, never forgotten. Wally TNJ Boy Howdy, GLS Genuinerisk Corinna

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You know, I'd have to say that I think it's appropriate for the vet to want to see the dogs personally. I think it's just good medicine. Even though it seems like a straightforward diagnosis to make based upon the stool analysis, there may be signs on clinical exam that will help confirm the diagnosis, or suggest to the vet that there may be something else going on that needs to be addressed.

 

I honestly don't think that the vet is doing it for the money. I get the sense that he's being cautious and thorough. :)

gallery_13500_3426_13848.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You know, I'd have to say that I think it's appropriate for the vet to want to see the dogs personally. I think it's just good medicine. Even though it seems like a straightforward diagnosis to make based upon the stool analysis, there may be signs on clinical exam that will help confirm the diagnosis, or suggest to the vet that there may be something else going on that needs to be addressed.

 

I honestly don't think that the vet is doing it for the money. I get the sense that he's being cautious and thorough. :)

 

Thanks, I do have an appointment tomorrow afternoon because I figured if they had to be seen either way I might as well not wait until the stool sample comes back.

 

Just another question though, If it was a UTI and a urine sample would you feel differently? To me it seems like they are the same kind of thing.

Edited by greytluck

Hobbes-Ricard Hatch09/23/99-12/21/09 Always loved, never forgotten. Wally TNJ Boy Howdy, GLS Genuinerisk Corinna

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest KennelMom

Our vet will prescribe based on a stool sample, if they find something obvious. They usually don't need to see the dog. I mean, really they're probably going to see something that either needs a de-wormer or something like flagyl. Since you can trace this back to a specific incident that is most likely the cause, it seems pretty straightforward. They *may* want to see the dogs to make sure they aren't dehydrated, if the loose stool has been going on for a while. But, our vet knows us well enough to know that we know when a dog is dehydrated.

 

So, it's not totally out of line, but it might be a bit overkill. Kinda depends on what is found or not found in the stool sample.

Edited by KennelMom
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Energy11

Some vets like to do a hands-on exam, especially in the case of GI problems. They palpate the spleen, liver, etc. to be sure they feel normal, and of course do a fecal. They also may want more recent bloodwork to check for infection.

 

Good Luck and hope this all passes quickly!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as the UTI goes (as well as worming), I think the decision about whether the vet wants to personally see the dog or not depends a lot on your relationship with the vet. If she/he has gotten to know you well enough to trust your judgment and know that you're savvy when it comes to your pups' care (like Heather, who's cared for more dogs than I'll see in a lifetime :bow ), I'd bet the vet would be very willing to prescribe based upon your description of symptoms and the results of the urinalysis.

 

I think it's also OK to come out and ask the vet if she/he would be comfortable doing this for you, or if the office has an across-the-board policy about animals needing to be seen. It may just be a matter of the vet getting to know you better. :)

 

 

gallery_13500_3426_13848.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as the UTI goes (as well as worming), I think the decision about whether the vet wants to personally see the dog or not depends a lot on your relationship with the vet. If she/he has gotten to know you well enough to trust your judgment and know that you're savvy when it comes to your pups' care (like Heather, who's cared for more dogs than I'll see in a lifetime :bow ), I'd bet the vet would be very willing to prescribe based upon your description of symptoms and the results of the urinalysis.

 

I think it's also OK to come out and ask the vet if she/he would be comfortable doing this for you, or if the office has an across-the-board policy about animals needing to be seen. It may just be a matter of the vet getting to know you better. :)

 

Oh believe me the vet knows me very well. I have gone to this clinic for the last 10 years with my cats and the last 2 with the dogs. Hobbes has had more then his share of illness since I've had him and like I mentioned previously Wally goes in every 3 months for blood work. The staff jokes that they know my voice when I call and the vet has my number memorized. I didn't talk to the vet herself just the receptionist so I guess it is a clinic policy.

 

I'm just a bit skeptical, because although I feel they are an excellent vet clinic as far as medical care goes, their prices have sky rocketed over the years. In many cases I feel they try to up sell what is actually needed and gorge you on things like medicine and treatments. The vet I see is absolutely great, she is not the head vet nor in charge of the policies of the clinic. If she were to leave the clinic I would also take my business else where but I have a good rapoire with her so I stay. The owner/chief vet gives me the creeps, I've had enough experience with her to know the second you walk in all she sees is dollar signs. I refuse to bring my pets to her, I'll wait until the vet I use is in the office or use another junior vet instead.

Edited by greytluck

Hobbes-Ricard Hatch09/23/99-12/21/09 Always loved, never forgotten. Wally TNJ Boy Howdy, GLS Genuinerisk Corinna

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK, time to strategize. :lol

 

Is it possible for you to leave a message with the receptionist for your own vet to call you back? Then, you can discuss the situation one-on-one, and perhaps she can arrange for you to bring in specimens for her to personally analyze. Then if she thinks meds are in order, she can give them to you or (even better) call in a script to a pharmacy if it's a human med.

gallery_13500_3426_13848.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can drop off a sample for a fecal float, about $20, and then go back to pick up treatment if parasites were found. No exam necessary. I figured this was standard practice. . . maybe not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This may just be a Maryland thing, but I *believe* Dr. Patty has said that in order for her to prescribe medication, she has to have examined the patient sometime within the past 30 days, and I believe it has to have been an exam for the same symptoms. So if one of my dogs saw her for stomach issues and she prescribes a medication and I tell her a week later that it didn't work, she would more than likely prescribe something else without doing an exam. However, if I took a dog in for a well visit (or ear infection, or whatever), and then two weeks later, call her about stomach issues, she would want to examine the dog before prescribing anything.

 

I know we had clients whose dogs would get ear infections a few times a year, but we couldn't give them medication unless we had seen the patient for an ear infection within the previous 30 days.... Very frustrating for the owner, and frustrating for the staff as well. (then again, yeast vs. bacterial = different meds)

 

On the other hand, that last little bit could also be because the owner of that particular clinic needs to finance his mansion on the Chesapeake Bay, and may not actually be the law.... :rolleyes:

Deanna with galgo Willow, greyhound Finn, and DH Brian
Remembering Marcus (11/16/93 - 11/16/05), Tyler (2/3/01 - 11/6/06), Frazzle (7/2/94 - 7/23/07), Carrie (5/8/96 - 2/24/09), Blitz (3/28/97 - 6/10/11), Symbra (12/30/02 - 7/16/13), Scarlett (10/10/02 - 08/31/13), Wren (5/25/01 - 5/19/14),  Rooster (3/7/07 - 8/28/18), Q (2008 - 8/31/19), and Momma Mia (2002 - 12/9/19).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...