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My Senior Boy Is Limping


Guest MyBoys
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My almost 11 year old boy began limping this morning on the way home from our walk, it was not exactly a limp but an obvious change in his gait. I felt different spots on him with no reaction, then I checked his feet and pads and found a corn on his pad. None of my greys over the years have ever had a corn so I am new to the treatment of them. Can someone suggest the best way and the least painful way to handle this problem. THANKS!!!!!!!!

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Guest Energy11

Staggerlee always has corns. He has a big one on his left hind pad. Some people Dremel them, some "hull" them, and some have oinements, etc. to soften. For me, I Dremel Staggerlee's, and he wears booties when he walks.

 

Good Luck. I am sure the others will have tons of ideas, too!

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You can take him to the vet and the vet can hull it for you. If you can watch the vet you can learn how to do it yourself so you won't have to go back when it grows back again.

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

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Guest greyarea

Molly recently developed a corn. Like with your boy, I first noted a change in her gait. She seemed to be putting her left foot down a little flatter than the right. Then it progressed into a mild limp, and finally she balked at just about any activity - which was sad, because Molly is a high-energy, fun-loving dog. I found some good threads on "corns" on GreyTalk and some discussions on how to hull the corns. Take a look at this link:

 

http://www.grassmere-animal-hospital.com/corn_hulling.htm

 

After reading this and getting an idea how it's done, I tried myself. I started by soaking her paw for about 15 minutes to get the corn soft (remembering from my own experience with planters warts). Then, using only my fingernails, so as not to go too deep and cause bleeding, I slowly manipulated the corn until it was free all the way around. Then I slowly began to squeeze around the perimeter of the corn with my nails to start pulling it upward. Molly tolerated all of this very well and I was extra careful not to cause any bleeding. As the corn moved upward, I applied a gentle scissor action with my nails. With some patience, I finally got the corn to pop out - no bleeding. It was still soft, but when it dried it was as hard as a rock.

 

After about 3 weeks or so, we could tell the corn was coming back. Our vet had told us that some trainers actually squeeze the corns out (Ouch!) to avoid a surgical procedure. With that in mind, I performed the same procedure as before, but this time I gently squeezed the pad to force the root of the corn upward. Again, only finger nails, no bleeding and Molly tolerated this like a champ. It's now been over a month and every time we check, what's left of the corn appears to be getting smaller. It's barely visible at this point, and Molly is back to chasing her frisbee and terrorizing the squirrels.

 

Good luck!

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