Jump to content

Any Experience With Pythiosis?


Recommended Posts

A friend's 2 year old chocolate lab died and the necropsy revealed Pythiosis.

He'd had a small cut on a leg and it was treated as a staff infection, given antibiotics and prednisone (which was stopped when he could not tolerate the pred).

A week later he was in the E-vet for severe vomiting. He'd lost 10 lbs in one week.

A week after that he died in his sleep.

The necropsy revealed Pythiosis with mesenteric lymph nodes notably enlarged with a cavernous hemorrhagic center which had ruptured. There was 40cc of clotted blood in the abdominal cavity.

From the report:

Canine pythiosis presents as cutaneous or subcutaneous lesions, acquired through open wounds on the skin, or gastrointestinal lesions which are aquired when Pythium insidiosum contacts the mucous membranes. The fact that dogs frequently drink stagnant water and eat grass that may contain elements of P. insidiosum explains the intestinal pythiosis cases seen in caines. Canine gastrointestinal pythiosis is characterized by vomiting, weight loss, and sporadic diarrhea. Formation of hard gastrointestinal tumor-like masses and areas of thickeness and mucosal ulceration are common. The infect may spread to adjacent tissues such as pancreas, uterus, and mesenteric lumph nodes.

He included links to: Wikipedia

 

I also found this: another lab with it

 

And a comment on justanswer.com: I am sure your vet told you that pythiosis is caused by a nasty organism (Pythium). Unfortuately fungus is much more difficult to destroy that bacteria. There is another medication that your vet can try. It is Terbinafine. It is available on Wal-Mart's $4 prescription list. There is a very nice veterinarian by the name of Dr. Amy Grooters who is at Louisiana State and she does research with this and similar fungal organisms. She would be happy to email your vet about options. Here is a link to her : Dr Grooters

Another nickname for this is "swamp cancer".

And here's something form caninecancer.com: here

And another link: here too

 

The necropsy on my friend's lab was done by a vet with the NC Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory System. He commented that he had never seen a case of Pythiosis before.

My friend said that her dog did swim in a pond just before the onset of symptoms. The pond's edges looked stagnant (with algae) but the center had an aerating water fountain.

 

So, does anyone here have any experience with Pythiosis? Is so, how did your vet distinquish this from another cause of gastrointestinal disorder and was the dog successfully treated?

 

Editing to add: Given the rarity of this, I told the owner to consider informing the local Health Dept. Maybe that pond needs to be checked since many dogs play in it.

 

Edited by macoduck

 

Freshy (Droopys Fresh), NoAh the podenco orito, Howie the portuguese podengo maneto
Angels: Rita the podenco maneta, Lila, the podenco, Mr X aka Denali, Lulu the podenco andaluz, Hada the podenco maneta, Georgie Girl (UMR Cordella),  Charlie the iggy,  Mazy (CBR Crazy Girl), Potato, my mystery ibizan girl, Allen (M's Pretty Boy), Percy (Fast But True), Mikey (Doray's Patuti), Pudge le mutt, Tessa the iggy, Possum (Apostle), Gracie (Dusty Lady), Harold (Slatex Harold), "Cousin" Simon our step-iggy, Little Dude the iggy ,Bandit (Bb Blue Jay), Niña the galgo, Wally (Allen Hogg), Thane (Pog Mo Thoine), Oliver (JJ Special Agent), Comet, & Rosie our original mutt.

tiny hada siggy.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest BiancasMom

I have not heard of Pythiosis but I live in Washington state so that may be why. I just read the link you provided as well as some other info I found on Google. It sounds like a devestating disease! I'm sorry for your friends loss. Hopefully more research will be done and they will find a medication that works against it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest SoulsMom

Wow, that is scary, esp given what has been going on with Soul. I wonder how long the disease had progressed before any signs could be seen with Xrays, etc. Soul had a ultrasound in November and everything looked fine. Wonder if we need to do another one . . .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest GentleHugs

Wow.... never heard of it.

 

Scarey but good to know. I'm saving that info in my medical file for future reference.

 

Thanks for posting. I've learned something new again today.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest eaglflyt

Thank you so much for posting this information. This is the first time I've heard of this. We live in OK, so I think we're in an area that may have this organism.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

bumping to see if the evening crowd has any experience with this.....

 

Freshy (Droopys Fresh), NoAh the podenco orito, Howie the portuguese podengo maneto
Angels: Rita the podenco maneta, Lila, the podenco, Mr X aka Denali, Lulu the podenco andaluz, Hada the podenco maneta, Georgie Girl (UMR Cordella),  Charlie the iggy,  Mazy (CBR Crazy Girl), Potato, my mystery ibizan girl, Allen (M's Pretty Boy), Percy (Fast But True), Mikey (Doray's Patuti), Pudge le mutt, Tessa the iggy, Possum (Apostle), Gracie (Dusty Lady), Harold (Slatex Harold), "Cousin" Simon our step-iggy, Little Dude the iggy ,Bandit (Bb Blue Jay), Niña the galgo, Wally (Allen Hogg), Thane (Pog Mo Thoine), Oliver (JJ Special Agent), Comet, & Rosie our original mutt.

tiny hada siggy.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
Guest janienorris

I had googled Pythiosis and saw the GreyTalk question by 'Macoduck'. I registered, but I'm not real sure how to make sure Macoduck sees this message.

 

I have lost 3 girls to Pythiosis ('04, '05 & '08). I am currently working with ACVIM (American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine) Foundation to get a grant for Research/Study and an Awareness Campaign on Pythiosis. Anybody interested in this work can email me at emilycharlie@erfw.net The study should begin late '09; however, anybody that needs immediate help contact Bob Glass of Pan American Veterinary Lab at 800-856-9655. PAV Lab makes a Canine Serum that has shown 50% success rate and greater if caught very early. The key to survival of this disease is an EARLY diagnosis.

 

Janie

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest LindsaySF

I don't have any experience with it. From what I understand it is pretty rare.

 

Can I ask why the vet prescribed prednisone if he/she suspected a staph infection?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't have any experience with it. From what I understand it is pretty rare.

 

Can I ask why the vet prescribed prednisone if he/she suspected a staph infection?

 

My friend's lab had a cut or scrape on the skin and the vet wondered if it was initially an ordinary infection v staph infection.

 

I had googled Pythiosis and saw the GreyTalk question by 'Macoduck'. I registered, but I'm not real sure how to make sure Macoduck sees this message.

 

I have lost 3 girls to Pythiosis ('04, '05 & '08). I am currently working with ACVIM (American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine) Foundation to get a grant for Research/Study and an Awareness Campaign on Pythiosis. Anybody interested in this work can email me at emilycharlie@erfw.net The study should begin late '09; however, anybody that needs immediate help contact Bob Glass of Pan American Veterinary Lab at 800-856-9655. PAV Lab makes a Canine Serum that has shown 50% success rate and greater if caught very early. The key to survival of this disease is an EARLY diagnosis.

 

Janie

 

Janie, I'll email you later today as I am headed out the door now. The pathologist who came up with this finding was very surprised as pythiosis is not supposed to be in the part of the country. My local vets need to be made aware of this and documentation from you would be more helpful/impressive than just me telling them about it.

 

Freshy (Droopys Fresh), NoAh the podenco orito, Howie the portuguese podengo maneto
Angels: Rita the podenco maneta, Lila, the podenco, Mr X aka Denali, Lulu the podenco andaluz, Hada the podenco maneta, Georgie Girl (UMR Cordella),  Charlie the iggy,  Mazy (CBR Crazy Girl), Potato, my mystery ibizan girl, Allen (M's Pretty Boy), Percy (Fast But True), Mikey (Doray's Patuti), Pudge le mutt, Tessa the iggy, Possum (Apostle), Gracie (Dusty Lady), Harold (Slatex Harold), "Cousin" Simon our step-iggy, Little Dude the iggy ,Bandit (Bb Blue Jay), Niña the galgo, Wally (Allen Hogg), Thane (Pog Mo Thoine), Oliver (JJ Special Agent), Comet, & Rosie our original mutt.

tiny hada siggy.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest LindsaySF

I just find it weird that the vet would prescribe a steroid, an immunosuppressant, for a suspected infection. It's good that he was on antibiotics at the same time, but depressing his immune system at that time could have allowed infection to take hold faster/deeper than it would have normally. I don't know how virulent pythiosis is on its own, but the steroids certainly wouldn't help.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The pathologist who came up with this finding was very surprised as pythiosis is not supposed to be in the part of the country.

 

That's not what Pythiosis.com says:

 

PYTHIOSIS ALERTS (Areas that have had recent cases of Pythiosis)

Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Florida, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia

 

And then a paper from 1999 on pythiosis in dogs was written by staff at NCSU:

 

Med Mycol. 1999 Dec;37(6):427-33.Links

A description of cutaneous-subcutaneous pythiosis in fifteen dogs.

Dykstra MJ, Sharp NJ, Olivry T, Hillier A, Murphy KM, Kaufman L, Kunkle GA, Pucheu-Haston C.

 

Microbiology, Pathology and Parasitology Department, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh 27606, USA.

Coco (Maze Cocodrillo)

Minerva (Kid's Snipper)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest VirginiaGreys

Someone posted this warning somewhere...and I kept it....not sure if this is anything like what you were referring to...but it's still something for people to know when they let their dogs swim in ponds.

 

Blue Green Algae Kills Dogs The wonder fuel and food algae, not so good for your pet, if they go swimming in it that is. Do you know how serious blue-green algae are to your dog? Some breeds of dogs such as Labs, Water Spaniels and Retrievers truly thrive when they are dashing through a refreshing pond or lake. They love the water and unbeknown to the dogs as well as the dog owners, a cruel and sometimes hidden danger may lurk in the waters that your dog loves so very much. It’s called blue-green algae and it can kill your precious pooch. The Ins and Outs of Blue-Green Algae Algae is a common sight in bodies of waters (especially surface waters), and are recognized as a natural part of any aquatic environment. However, various temperature conditions and other factors can cause what is known as \"algae blooms,\" which turns the water green and often produces a terrible foul smell. While most algae don’t cause any problems, it is the blue-green variety that is highly toxic - wreaking havoc on both people and animals - causing humans to become sick and many dogs to die as a result. Detecting Blue-Green Algae Depending on the time of year and location, blue-algae can become a real problem, especially when it comes to warm, shallow lakes. Dog owners should especially take extra precaution when the weather is warm and aquatic plants seem abundant and full. There are unique characteristics associated with blue-green algae that give it the ability to wildly grow, including the capacity to utilize nitrogen from the air and water to boost production. When high amounts of blue-green algae are found in waters, an entire body of water may change in appearance. Unfortunately, these are the kinds of changes that can kill your dog. When blue-green algae take over water, a cloudy appearance appears, causing the water to become a shade of green or blue-green. A cast or hue is often seen. I’ve walked by ponds and lakes that give off a distinct \"musty\" or \"earthy\" odor, which is a result of decomposing algae that has congregated in large floating blankets upon the surface of the water. The worst cases show \"surface scum,\" which consists of dead and decomposing algae. Usually, when you get up close to blue-algae infested waters, the look is much similar to a natural bowl of pea soup. The presence of algae blooms usually means there is a high chance of toxicity. Toxic algae also appear foamy and may even display a bright green, brown, or red color. While often the water smells bad, there are times it does not. Blue-Green Algae: Bad for Dogs! Since blue-green algae looks and smells bad, humans tend to avoid swimming in affected waters, but a dog is doesn’t care about the scientific dangers that dwell in their refreshing play land. Instead, they plunge deep into the freshwater ponds, lakes, or streams and when they have worked up a sweat - take a swallow or two - which may prove quite fatal under various circumstances. The level of damage associated with blue-green algae depends on the amount of water or algal cells a dog ingests, the size of the dog, the amount of food in the dog’s stomach, the type and amount of toxin within the algae, and the level of sensitivity regarding your dog’s breed. A dog exposed to toxic blue-green algae may become nauseous; suffer skin irritations or intense skin sores; and/or experience problems with their nervous, circulatory, and digestive systems. In the worst cases, a dog may undergo a series of convulsions and then die. I heard of a story of a Border Collie of nine months that went swimming in a Michigan pond, as part of a regular routine of conditioning with her owner and two other doggy companions. This particular trip to the pond went quite sour, as the Border Collie threw up and lost consciousness after drinking some of the pond water. The owner rushed his pet to an emergency veterinarian clinic, where she was hooked up to a ventilator, but sadly did not make it. The vet explained to the owner that he had recently seen a few cases of dogs losing their lives to blue-green algae toxicity. He then went on to explain that toxic algae blooms not only occur during the late summer or early fall, but can develop at any time of the year (especially in fresh water). Overall, blue-green algae deposits are scary and I’m very concerned about letting my Poodles swim in lakes or ponds if I see anything even vaguely suspicious looking. Depending on the level of contact, a dog may respond as quickly as 15 to 20 minutes after the time of ingestion. If you should ever become faced with an accidental ingestion of blue-green algae water, you should immediately wash off your pet’s coat (to prevent self cleaning contamination) and take your dog to the vet if you should spot any troublesome signs. Dogs Die from Cyanobacteria, Agencies Investigate Some kinds of cyanobacteria, or blue green algae, which grows in ponds, lakes and swimming holes in the Pacific Northwest, create toxins that can make pets sick or die. Wherever you take your dog to play, be sure to check for the algae Dangers of Blue-Green Algae Blue-Green Algae, also known as Cyanobateria, is toxic to dogs. Contrary to its name, it is not always blue-green in color. Its color can be green, yellow, brown, or red. Dogs develop toxicity from ingestion of the algae by drinking By: Sandy Riordan Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com By Sandy Riordan Creator of the Website - Standard Poodles USA Everything you need and want to kinow about Standard Poodles! http://www.standardpoodlesusa.com
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...