Jump to content

Those Dogs With Cancer


Recommended Posts

We lost our girlie Lulu to bone cancer in her rear leg in February of this year, just two weeks after her 7th birthday. She had been diagnosed just seven weeks prior when she began to limp for what seemed to be no reason. Our girlie was retired young, and was only 18 months old when we adopted her.

 

She never raced.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest PhillyPups

My SugarBear, who I lost to osteo at 14.5 raced for a very short period of time, or as her breeder described her, "A sweet little blue fawn girl, couldn't run worth a damn".

 

My TigerPower, also lost to osteo, ran about as well as she did.

 

BarbieJade had an awesome career, retired from racing over the age of 4 with only 6 races in her career in Grade C, the rest were A or B, then going into her second career as MamaDawg, whelping 34 puppies did not have cancer when I lost her suddenly at 13-3/4 years old.

 

Like BarbieJade, my Stepper, lost at 13.5 and not to cancer raced 224 races.

 

So I think my experience disproves your thoughts on this :dunno

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got Jamey as a 20 month old pup. He had 6 training races and was just not interested in racing, so he was retired. So basically he didn't really race. He is still with us after having his right front leg amputated due to osteosarcoma on June 4th. The first symptoms were noticed in mid-late april.

 

ETA leg amputation due to osteo

Edited by mom2four

Tin and Michael and Lucas, Picasso, Hero, Oasis, Galina, Neizan, Enzo, Salvo and Noor the Galgos.
Remembering Bridge Angel Greyhounds: Tosca, Jamey, Master, Diego, and Ambi; plus Angel Galgos Jules, Marco and Baltasar.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've heard that cancer is just prevalent in the large breeds: Great Danes, Greyhounds, Irish Wolfhounds, etc. I read somewhere that half of all IW deaths were cancer-related.

15060353021_97558ce7da.jpg
Kathy and Q (CRT Qadeer from Fuzzy's Cannon and CRT Bonnie) and
Jane (WW's Aunt Jane from Trent Lee and Aunt M); photos to come.

Missing Silver (5.19.2005-10.27.2016), Tigger (4.5.2007-3.18.2016),
darling Sam (5.10.2000-8.8.2013), Jacey-Kasey (5.19.2003-8.22.2011), and Oreo (1997-3.30.2006)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest KennelMom

I think cancer in dogs is like cancer in people - it's a complex relationship between genetics and environment.

 

I am curious to know if the dogs who got cancer raced for longer periods of time..perhpas more steroids in the body? Just curious.

 

Racing dogs aren't given steroids.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest GentleHugs

The only Grey I've lost to cancer out of my four that have passed was Jackie. She raced until she was five and she was part Irish. She ended up with an extremely aggressive mass on her heart - it was as big as a golf ball. She didn't show any signs or symptoms until about 7 hours before we took her to the e vet in an emergency. She had no pulse in her hind legs at all. She lacked 10 days before turning 12. Absolutely crushed me losing her. :brokenheart She was one of those hounds that never let you know she was feeling ill. She was my alpha and I guess she thought she needed to show strength even in her weakest of moments.

 

I personally don't think cancer in Greyhounds is related to how long they raced though. I think LS, Wobbler's and other joint problems are possibly caused by how long they raced but cancer - no. There's been some fairly young Greyhounds that never raced that ended up with cancer. I'm thinking it's more genetic than anything or possibly environmental but the environmental issue would be a long shot.

 

Now, I've heard (but don't know how true this is so don't quote me on it) that if a Grey breaks their leg and it's surgically repaired, the greater the risk of them developing osteo in later years is much higher than a Grey that has never had a broken leg before. I was told it has something to do with the bone being exposed to air during surgery and of course, the hardware they have to use to repair the break with. I'd like to pick Dr. Couto's brain with that question since he's done so much research on the subject of Greyhonds and cancer.

Edited by GentleHugs
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Energy11

Max was an excellent racer. Diagonsed with Osteo at 12.5 years... went three months before The Bridge. VERY early diagnosis, though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest GreenGreys

Ranger raced past his 5th birthday, a total of 255 races. He was diagnosed with osteosarcoma on June 5th and had his rear leg amputated on June 23rd.

 

Dr. Vilar at OSU asked me to send some of Ranger's blood for their current research into whether racing dogs have a greater/higher occurrence of cancer (not remembering if specifically osteo) than AKC hounds. So enough people are asking the same question to cause a research study.

 

Wonder if we'll ever know the answer?

 

Pat, 3 hounds, 1 whippet

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest sja5032

To repeat what someone else said above, racing dogs are NOT given steroids. There are pee tests at the end of each race and kennel inspections by the state police (at least in MA) to search for anything of the like. Any greyhound trainer in their right mind would not give a dog steroids because it increases the likelihood of injury and would shorten a greys career, so the cancer theory would be wrong because if these greys were exposed to steroids they would have shorter careers not long ones with constant exposure.

 

Personally, it hurts me when people think these things of me. I myself am a racing trainer, I would never do anything that would endanger my dogs and I do everything to keep them safe, healthy and happy.

 

If I would have to come up with a better theory it would be that it has something to do with genetics. Almost all greys are related somewhere down the line, I don't know if there has been any research done as to specific bloodlines that may increase the likelihood of cancer. This would be more proactive then pointing the finger at racing and steroids.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As Heather said, they are not given steroids. They have a pee test at the end of a race.

 

My personal belief is that TBDs contribute to cancer by lowering the immune system. Some on the tick list have mentioned this also.

 

Cosmo didn't race very long. 32 races, I believe. Anyway, she was barely two when we adopted her.

 

To Diane's point however, I was told that she tested positive and was treated for babesia in random testing at the track. So it could be there's some merit to that theory.

...............Chase (FTH Smooth Talker), Morgan (Cata), Reggie (Gable Caney), Rufus
(Reward RJ). Fosters check in, but they don't check out.
Forever loved -- Cosmo (System Br Mynoel), March 11, 2002 - October 8, 2009.
Miss Cosmo was a lady. And a lady always knows when to leave.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest GentleHugs
To repeat what someone else said above, racing dogs are NOT given steroids. There are pee tests at the end of each race and kennel inspections by the state police (at least in MA) to search for anything of the like. Any greyhound trainer in their right mind would not give a dog steroids because it increases the likelihood of injury and would shorten a greys career, so the cancer theory would be wrong because if these greys were exposed to steroids they would have shorter careers not long ones with constant exposure.

 

Personally, it hurts me when people think these things of me. I myself am a racing trainer, I would never do anything that would endanger my dogs and I do everything to keep them safe, healthy and happy.

 

If I would have to come up with a better theory it would be that it has something to do with genetics. Almost all greys are related somewhere down the line, I don't know if there has been any research done as to specific bloodlines that may increase the likelihood of cancer. This would be more proactive then pointing the finger at racing and steroids.

 

Maybe the OP didn't quite mean steroids but maybe they meant hormone shots to keep the females from going into season during their racing careers since they are intact as well?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest GreysAndMoreGreys
To repeat what someone else said above, racing dogs are NOT given steroids. There are pee tests at the end of each race and kennel inspections by the state police (at least in MA) to search for anything of the like. Any greyhound trainer in their right mind would not give a dog steroids because it increases the likelihood of injury and would shorten a greys career, so the cancer theory would be wrong because if these greys were exposed to steroids they would have shorter careers not long ones with constant exposure.

 

Personally, it hurts me when people think these things of me. I myself am a racing trainer, I would never do anything that would endanger my dogs and I do everything to keep them safe, healthy and happy.

 

If I would have to come up with a better theory it would be that it has something to do with genetics. Almost all greys are related somewhere down the line, I don't know if there has been any research done as to specific bloodlines that may increase the likelihood of cancer. This would be more proactive then pointing the finger at racing and steroids.

 

Maybe the OP didn't quite mean steroids but maybe they meant hormone shots to keep the females from going into season during their racing careers since they are intact as well?

Doubtful, then she would only be interested in hearing about the female greyhounds who had osteo.

 

sja, you will get use to hearing things along these lines and you will grow a tougher skin. I know I have.

 

I look at why did my dogs get osteo as I look at any human who gets cancer for no explainable reason.

The nice thing with a retired racing greyhound, you have an escape goat you can blame just about anything and everything on, their racing life.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest KennelMom

The only "make you go hmmmm" theory I've read related to greyhounds and racing is the force exerted on the "rail-side" leg (left) during a race...racing possibly causes microcopic damage to the bone over and over again that eventually makes the leg more susceptable to cancer. But that would be osteo, specifically and not the other kinds. Not sure I've ever read any evidence to back it up or disprove it, though I think there was a left leg/right leg poll done on GT a while back to see if there was a more common side. I'm sure OSU would keep that kind of stat.

 

The TBD theory is an interesting one as well, though the few dogs we've had that we know for sure had TBDs died of old age, not any kind of cancer. And two dogs that we know for sure didn't (well as sure as you can be, but they were used as blood donors for years and years) actually died of cancer (one osteo, one chondrosarcoma). But, that's just a handful of anecdotal cases that don't mean much...still, interesting theory and it makes sense on the surface...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest MnMDogs
The only "make you go hmmmm" theory I've read related to greyhounds and racing is the force exerted on the "rail-side" leg (left) during a race...racing possibly causes microcopic damage to the bone over and over again that eventually makes the leg more susceptable to cancer. But that would be osteo, specifically and not the other kinds. Not sure I've ever read any evidence to back it up or disprove it, though I think there was a left leg/right leg poll done on GT a while back to see if there was a more common side. I'm sure OSU would keep that kind of stat.

 

That's pretty interesting. Matty's was in her left femur - we speculated it may have had something to do with all the extra weight she put on it due to her badly damaged right hock. But I guess we'll never know.

 

ETA she had an incredibly short racing career, so that probably wouldn't apply in her case.

Edited by MnMDogs
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I pretty much figure it has something to do with genetics. Emmy was retired a heck of a lot longer than she raced so that throws that theory right out the window.

 

As far as any drugs given in the kennels, the only thing females get are hormones to keep them from coming into season. The rest are all supplements just like we all give our retired racers on our couches.

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I listened to Dr. Couto speak for two hours at the expo; they are looking to genetics at this point, because there is no correlation between racing and bone cancer, but bone cancer is virtually unheard of in AKC Greyhounds who are obviously bred from different lines.

 

I believe they're even collecting DNA from hounds with cancer at this point for a "library" of samples.


Hamish-siggy1.jpg

Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

but bone cancer is virtually unheard of in AKC Greyhounds who are obviously bred from different lines.

 

Not the case. Have been a couple just on this board.

 

ETA: There was a thread on this same topic not long ago. Probably still here as I don't think H&M gets archived very often, if at all.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

but bone cancer is virtually unheard of in AKC Greyhounds who are obviously bred from different lines.

 

Not the case. Have been a couple just on this board.

 

ETA: There was a thread on this same topic not long ago. Probably still here as I don't think H&M gets archived very often, if at all.

I'll find it. Elaine posted about how many AKC breeders would not publicize cancer in their lines so it is hard to tell how prevalent it really is.

 

http://forum.greytalk.com/index.php?showto...233240&st=0

Edited by Hubcitypam
gallery_8149_3261_283.jpg
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

√ó
√ó
  • Create New...