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Sherman Puked Up Bones And A Rock!


Guest Shermanator

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Guest Shermanator

I have started feeding turkey necks for their teeth, and their teeth are looking GREAT! They got one on Monday and Tuesday (last night).

Last night on a walk, Patton pooed, and I noticed little chunks of bone. :eek Is this normal?

This morning, Sherman puked up bits of bone, and a rock. :blink: I think the rock is from eating the turkey neck outside last night, and he accidentally got a rock.

Is this normal (the bone)? Would this hurt them? I'm a momma new to feeding turkey necks.

Everybody has been normal here - no behavior changes- I just noticed the bone.

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Well, the raw feeding people may tell you it's normal. I myself don't think it is and would not continue to feed something that caused that type of problem. And yes, it could hurt him.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest Shermanator

Ok, now I'm petrified. I've tried to find other posts about this problem, and the results have alwys been bad.

Fortunately both boys are still acting like their normal self, and went berserk (normal) for bye-bye busicuts when I left this morning.

DH works @ home, and is keeping an eye on them all day.

 

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Last time we gave turkey necks to our guys, Atlas ended up with "D" with pieces of bone in it. I decided to stop feeding them turkey necks at that point. He was no worse for wear, but it made me nervous. I do wonder if maybe he had a bad neck, because he had had a dozen before that with no ill effects.

 

I did give him a small piece of neck at Christmas (the one from the turkey cut into four pieces) and he was fine with that.

Jennifer and Beamish (an unnamed Irish-born Racer) DOB: October 30, 2011

 

Forever and always missing my "Vowels", Icarus, Atlas, Orion, Uber, and Miss Echo, and Mojito.

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Guest luckydog

Birds use small stones in their gizzards to break up the seeds they eat. Do the turkey necks include the gizzard? If they do, then I'll bet that's where the small stone came from.

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Guest HeatherDemps

I fed raw for awhile with no problems, including turkey necks. Then, Dempsey ended up wiht liquid poop and we had to go to the vet. I can't remember for sure what the diagnosis was, but I think it was pancreatitis. I quit feeding raw after that. I know that others have had great success with the raw diet, but I got way to nervous after that happened.

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Sounds like the rock may have irritated his tummy and caused those things to be brought back up.

 

When we first started feeding raw, the dogs would have small bone pieces in their poop - mostly from turkey drumsticks (we don't use turkey necks because they are pricey here and I don't think there is anything magical about them). After a while their stomach acids seemed to get stronger and I stopped seeing bone pieces. The dogs never showed any discomfort with this.

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As a raw feeder, I wouldn't worry too much if 1) your dogs don't throw up often, and 2) the pieces of bone are small. When dogs are newly fed raw, they may lack the digestive enzymes to fully break down the bone. That means you see it in vomit or stool until the enzymes catch up with the new diet. I think Duncan has thrown up bone only once in the 14 months he has been raw fed so that may help you guage your dogs' experience.

 

The rock is a whole other story. I guess any dog could eat a rock from time to time. It wouldn't be the throwing up part that would bother me about that -- it would be the tooth chipping/breaking problem on the way into the dog.

 

Hope whatever you decide works out well for you.

 

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Guest jettcricket

Personally, I'd be afraid if my dog was throwing up fragments of bone/pooping bones that it could puncture their bowels. That could be deadly.

 

I feed my kids Innova, but I'm switching over to EVO (made by the same company that makes Innova). It's kibble, but it's the closest thing to feeding them raw.

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I have started feeding turkey necks for their teeth, and their teeth are looking GREAT! They got one on Monday and Tuesday (last night).

Last night on a walk, Patton pooed, and I noticed little chunks of bone. :eek Is this normal?

This morning, Sherman puked up bits of bone, and a rock. :blink: I think the rock is from eating the turkey neck outside last night, and he accidentally got a rock.

Is this normal (the bone)? Would this hurt them? I'm a momma new to feeding turkey necks.

Everybody has been normal here - no behavior changes- I just noticed the bone.

 

I think it's too much bone for Sherman right now. I started off feeding backs because at the time I didn't realize they were too boney. Neyla through up some bone (just yellow bile with bits of bone mixed in) a couple of times early on, but it did go away. What others have said is true, it will dissipate (whether it's b/c of stomach enzymes, the dog chewing better, or something else I don't know for sure), but in the meantime, I would switch to chicken quarters. There's a better ratio of meat:bone there so I don't think you'll see the bone issue if you feed those.

 

I would encourage you to keep feeding RMBs regularly though. It's the best thing you can do for their teeth (and also as a result great for their health in general since so many systemic diseases stem from dental problems).

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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I feed bones to my kibble fed kids for their teeth. Let me tell ya because they are and will be kibble fed finding a bone that wasn't too rich and would cause big d or cause a puking episode was major trial and error.

I learned from raw feeders to stay away from load bearing bones and found out that pork was too rich/fatty a food in general. The magic meat for us has been beef neck. The turkey and chicken bones were too small and soft for my chow hounds and did nothing for the teeth.

 

If he just accidentally at the rock while chewing the bone I would suggest you put down a towel and make sure he chews on that specific area.

Colleen with Covey (Admirals Cove) and Rally (greyhound puppy)
Missing my beloved boy INU (CJ Whistlindixie) my sweetest princess SALEM (CJ Little Dixie) and my baby girl ZOE (LR's Tara)

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Von Hanson's has 40# cases of chicken necks for $18.

 

Von Hanson's Meats & Spirits

2390 N Alma School Rd

Chandler, AZ 85224

(480) 917-2525

 

Much less expensive than turkey necks (which they also have), and the bones are much smaller. They're also fattier, so feel free to discard some of the excess skin to cut that back.

 

While it is true that the chicken necks don't allow for quite so much chewing as turkey necks, it is important to note that removing carbohydrate-rich kibble from the diet and replacing it with RMB will greatly reduce the amount of tartar formed. Dogs don't have the teeth, the gut, or the biochemistry that requires lots of vegetable matter- which is one reason many perform so poorly on corn, wheat, rice, and other inexpensive vegetable fillers.

 

There is no dietary requirement for carbohydrates in the canine, and the large quantities provided in many brands of kibble may not be good for them. In greyhounds, this works out to poorly formed stool and rotten mouths. So- while not as good as turkey (too much chicken can be bad- same as overdoing any component of feed), the chicken necks will get the job done.

 

Also note Von Hanson's has 60# cases of beef heart at $.99/pound. If you just want to try a few chunks to see if they like it, let me know!

Coco (Maze Cocodrillo)

Minerva (Kid's Snipper)

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Guest greyhounder

I'm sure tiny bits of bone on the poop are OK.. I'm also sure Sherman puked because he accidentally ate a rock stuck to the turkey neck... (that's why we feed our necks on the cool deck in an x-pen)

 

I wouldn't worry.. :)

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Been feeding raw for 7 years & once in a great while mine will hork up a small piece of turkey neck. Are you feeding large necks (like a lb or so)? I generally feed smaller hen necks & haven't had a problem with them. Digestive enzymes are a good suggestion for the time being; something that helps digest protein & fat (rather than carbs) like this for example.

 

Can't help you with the rock since my sissified dogs always eat in the house. :)

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Deirdre with Conor (Daring Pocobueno), Keeva (Kiowa Mimi Mona), & kittehs Gemma & robthomas.

Our beloved angels Faolin & Liath, & kittehs Mona & Caesar. Remembering Bobby, Doc McCoy, & Chip McGrath.

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Guest BlackandBrindle

Sadie has eaten rock and then thrown it up. It is more than likely the rock that made Sherman throw up.

 

I feed turkey necks when I can get them cheap, which isn't often. They are a lot of bone, so I have to make up for that by feeding more muscle/organ meat.

 

Chicken leg quarters have a better meat to bone ratio, I think, and we've never had problems with them. When I feed lamb, there is sometimes a bit of bone in Sadie's poop (or used to be) so I added some digestive enzymes for a while and that basically solved that problem.

 

Everyone has their own opinion about raw feeding and what is considered safe. I would suggest if you are going to feed them outside, putting down a shower curtain or sheet so they don't pick up the rock and gravel as well.

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Fletcher's been raw fed for 3 1/2 yrs and still occasionally horks up dinner including small bone pieces because he's a gulper. If I'm not quick, he re-eats it :puke. Turkey necks can be rich for a dog not used to them (turkey gives some dogs the Big D). It's up to you, but I think he will be fine. And I agree, the rock probably came from the yard, mine bring in gravel bits all the time :)

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I've been thinking more about this today and I think a lot of it comes down to your comfort level. When we started switching to raw I was fully expecting the big D and that the dogs wouldn't know what to do with this new weird food. Because everything went really smoothly in those areas, so a few small bone pieces didn't alarm me much. Plus the dogs were loving their new food and I was already seeing the positive benefits so I was willing to wait and see if it improved.

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