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Heart Murmurs


Guest MorganKonaAlex
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Guest MorganKonaAlex

I'm fostering with the intend to adopt a 6 year old girlie. She was diagnosed with a heart murmur in '04 and has been on 10mg of Enalipril daily since. I have no experience with heart murmurs and would appreciate hearing others' experiences.

Her labs:

1/04: Auscultation: II-III/VI L apical systolic murmur, Pulses-mod, C/R-Pi 1, Lungs-clear

EKG: sinus rhythm

ECHO: Mild LAE, thickened ant leaflet, good systolic function

Other: 3-4+ MR, 1+ AI

 

6/04: Auscultation: IV/VI L apical systolic murmur, Pulses-mod, C/R-Pi 1, Lungs-clear

EKG: sinus rhythm, HR-120

ECHO: good systolic function, thickened hyperechoic ant mitral leaflet, mild LAE

Other: 1+ AI, 3+ MR

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My Jitters had a pretty severe heart murmur - she took Enalipril also. She never had a problem, and I had her for 4 and a half years.

I just kept an eye on her breathing.

She had trouble when it was really hot, and I kept Lasix on hand just in case. I never had to use it.

Life with Leo the greyhound and Daisy the puggle.

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Guest LittleGreys

My Greyhound just had an echo at OSU, they said she has a grade 4 murmur and mitral valve insufficiency. The Dr there said it was no big concern, they recommend a yearly echo just to keep an eye on everything. She had been taking 10mg of enalapril once a day previous to that echo, they told me to take her off of it, that she didn't need it, and that wasn't a high enough dose to be therapeutic anyways.

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Guest HeatherDemps

My italian greyhound has a heart murmur but is not to the point where he needs medication. The vet told me we'll have to keep an eye on and watch it when it's time for him to be put under for his dental.

 

Not sure if this is the same in dogs as with humans, but growing up, I had a heart murmur (now undetectable). I know that the main thing I had to watch was when I went to the dentist for teeth cleanings, I had to be on antibiotics before/after to prevent bacteria traveling to the heart or something like that!

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With their engineering and athletic builds, mild heart murmers frequently found in greyhounds and are not considered a real concern. Of course the occcasional dog with a serious murmer should be treated. The following is from the OSU website:

 

"My Greyhound has a heart murmur; does this mean he has heart disease?

Greyhounds are known to have “normal” athletic or physiologic flow murmurs. These murmurs are mild in nature (grade 1 or 2 out of 6) and are heard best over the left base of the heart (high in the armpit). Thoracic radiographs (X-rays) and/or echocardiography (ultrasound) will help determine the actual status of the heart. For more information, please read the following article:

Left Basilar Systolic Murmur in Retired Racing Greyhounds "

 

Here is the link: http://www.vet.osu.edu/2376.htm

 

Too many greyhounds are treated and medicated unnecessaily for conditions such as murmers, hypothyroidism, enlarged hearts, etc simply because they are built differently and too many people, vets included, don't know better. It might be a good idea to have a greyhound knowledgeable vet double check your dogs murmer.

 

 

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"

 

Here is the link: http://www.vet.osu.edu/2376.htm

 

Too many greyhounds are treated and medicated unnecessaily for conditions such as murmers, hypothyroidism, enlarged hearts, etc simply because they are built differently and too many people, vets included, don't know better. It might be a good idea to have a greyhound knowledgeable vet double check your dogs murmer.

 

 

Heard this same thing years ago.

 

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A cardiologist can look at the heart and let you know if it is serious or not. My regular vet told me that Pearl had a murmur and asked if I wanted to see a specialist. Since I had just lost my 8 yr old to cancer and my 5 year old to liver disease 2 years earlier I jumped and said yes.

 

Pearl did not have a normal 'athletic' heart murmur. She has a bad mitral valve.

She went on enalapril and lasix and digoxin (because her heart rate was way too fast even for a nervous vet visit). During one of her regular cardio visits they said her heart looks good, but I told them she wasn't feeling that well. They did a BP. It was over 200. So she went on norvasc and phenoxybenzamine.

We still had trouble with her BP. Through some rough times and misdiagnoses, we found she had an abscessed tooth. Since she had uncontrolled hypertension, we couldn't anesthetize her safely to remove it, so we managed it with monthly antibiotics.

Her hypertension was still giving us problems so I decided to take the chance and put her under for a CT of her adrenals and removal of the abscess.

 

No adrenal tumor.

Bad tooth removed.

 

Turned out that the bad tooth had given her kidney disease, which was causing her hypertension. The kidney is not improving but is not worse. She was put on aspirin along with everything else she's on.

Her hypertension is now under control.

Her appetite is fantastic (which it hadn't been in years) and she made it to her 10th birthday last Oct. She was diagnosed with heart disease 4 years ago.

 

If anyone came to my house they would need to ask me which dog has the bad heart. You can't tell by watching them play outside.

 

 

In a nutshell.........see a cardiologist if you're that concerned.

 

 

 

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