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Let's Discuss Alternatives To Nsaid's


Guest EmilyAnne
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Guest EmilyAnne

I know there is a time and place for NSAID'S, and I have used them for our own dogs, sometimes with success, and sometimes with unacceptable side effects. I do prefer to avoid them if reasonably possible. I was wondering, what are alternatives things we can do for arthritic pets? There's weight loss (if overweight), heated pet beds, glucosamine...what else?

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Guest EmilyAnne

By the way, I am not asking because I currently have an arthritic pet, but I think it is good to know these things in advance, and I thought others might be interested in this topic as well. Our oldest dog is an American Eskimo, he is 12. He is in excellent health and barely shows any arthritis. He still romps, bounces and runs. I know eventually though his arthritis will get worse. It will be nice to know about alternatives before that time comes.

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Guest alannamac

I don't know if this is true, but I've read that in people, a gradual increase in exercise levels actually reduces arthritis symptoms, particularly swimming (which is not possible in most greys). If they are not too laid up, perhaps it is a good thing to try( not the swimming, but the increase in moderate exercise frequency)?

(not talking about crazy zoomies etc, just a series of short walks rather than one long walk, and at the beach on sand, or through the water if possible) And of course massage.....I'd be interested in hearing other people's feedback regarding this, as to whether they've tried this.....

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Yes, we make sure our older hounds get plenty of exercise - as much as they can manage daily. I do find it helps to keep them mobile, it's a classic example of 'use it or lose it' - but it will only take you so far, sadly.

 

We use joint supplements, at the moment Cosequin. I do massage them, and I make sure they don't get too chilled in the winter. Getting really cold seems to make them stiffer.

 

We also use fish oils as a supplement, or extra virgin olive oil, or sardines - making sure they get enough EFAs.

 

If you don't want to use NSAIDs you can try herbal supplements, but please remember that just because something is a natural substance does NOT mean it is totally harmless. For example, Devil's Claw is a good anti-inflammatory supplement, and yet it also causes the stomach to make more acid, therefore it can also cause peptic ulcers and gastric bleeding, just like the NSAIDs you buy from the vet. ;) One study found that it reduced blood sugar levels. It can also cause changes in heart rate and rhythm - and interacts with some prescription meds.

 

Another route you can take is acupuncture - we've had some success with that. It seems to be very effective for pain-relied.

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The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

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Tramadol is not an NSAID and is well tolerated by most dogs. Moreover, it doesn't damage the liver when used long term, like rimadyl can. When the other suggested things aren't working, I'd definitely use tramadol. (I already do use it if Turbo needs it for his corn.)


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Tramadol is not an NSAID and is well tolerated by most dogs. Moreover, it doesn't damage the liver when used long term, like rimadyl can. When the other suggested things aren't working, I'd definitely use tramadol. (I already do use it if Turbo needs it for his corn.)

 

 

One of the causes of pain and reasons NSAIDS are used before Tramadol is inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effect of NSAIDS helps to quiet the inflammation, thus reducing one source of pain. Tramadol is a nacrcotic pain killer and is a VERY serious drug. More so than NSAIDS. Instead of helping to fight the source of pain, it only masks the pain. (If you want to research it, the brand name is Ultram. Tramadol is it's generic name.)

 

When looking for safer alternatives to NSAIDS, a narcotic doesn't sound like one to me. About the only totally side-effect-free alternative is accupuncture. Moving to maintain mobility is important but can be very painful (known from personal experience) especially if it's osteoarthritis.

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Guest EmilyAnne

What about physical therapy for dogs? Is that hard to come by? My husband has seen physcal therapists from time to time for arthritis in shoulders and hands. Whatever it is they do, it is AWESOME! Physical therapists ROCK as far as I am concerned! :colgate And to keep the costs down, I am sure the could show you exercises to do with your greys at home. :)

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I use Traumeel, for both myself and my dogs when needed. It is a homeopathic med, and was recommended by our canine massage therapist. Our vet has been very impresssed by it't affectiveness. As well, the vet tech who runs our blood donor program works with hemopheliac dogs. They have started using Traumeel after treatments to relieve inflamation and have had excellent results.

 

Here's a link for you Traumeel

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I feel glucosamine/chondrotin/msm used alone or along with chiropractic and acupuncture are a better way to go then Nsaids. JMPO

Greyhound angels at the bridge- Casey, Charlie, Maggie, Molly, Renie, Lucy & Teddy. Beagle angels Peanut and Charlie. And to all the 4 legged Bridge souls who have touched my heart, thank you. When a greyhound looks into you eyes it seems they touch your very soul.

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One of the causes of pain and reasons NSAIDS are used before Tramadol is inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effect of NSAIDS helps to quiet the inflammation, thus reducing one source of pain.

 

:nod

 

In some conditions and certainly in injuries, getting rid of the inflamation is an important part of healing.

 

Tramadol does have deleterious effects on kidneys and liver, and is contraindicated for those with seizure disorders -- in people, at least.

 

I'm not a fan of chiropractic and have not personally seen any useful results from supplements. I might be inclined to try accupuncture for acute pain but have not personally seen it do anything for chronic pain as from arthritis.

 

 

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
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Boswellin is worth a try. It is available in health food stores. We used it for and old joint injury Gabriel had. He had been on Rimadyl and did not handle it well. A pretty big Yorkie breeder/shower (shows her dogs at Westminster) recommended it. It has the added value of actually being good for the liver. As an anti-inflammatory it worked as well as the Rimadyl for Gabriel. However, one of the side effects was loose stool. Since he got that worse with the Rimadyl also, I figured that was just par for the course.

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I had one for Jim, but I didn't think it helped. It's hard to keep the magnet over the jugular with a greyhound and that's where they say it should sit.

 

As a side note, they also say they don't advice the use of BioFlow magnets if you have cancer, though that may just be a generic disclaimer.

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The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

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For arthritis:

 

chondroitin made from bovine (not shark cartiledge), glucosamine (although I've tried it without much success), fish oil, vit E and MSM.

 

Many people I know use (as do I), Joint Health from Springtime Inc. and Fresh Factors. My current seniors get 3 Joint Health in the morning and 2 Fresh Factors in the evening along with fish oil, and vitamin E.

 

In the advanced aged seniors, I've used 8 Fresh Factors a day along with MSM, fish oil and vitamin E. There are also chinese herbs, both for inflammation and pain (long term and short term)

 

I am fortunate to have vets that come to the house for chiropractic and acupuncture. Chiropractic really helps. Once my chiropractic vet gets her rehab facility done, I'll have to take them there. I'm glad it's about 15-20 minutes down the road!

 

Arthritis is one area that Eastern medicine and alternative medicine really helps.

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Arthritis can be prevented and even cured by some natural supplements.

Using it before YOU see signs of arthritis is a good thing to do. when you see a hound gimping around, or having trouble getting up, damage has already been done. Giving the supplements before that happens, helps prevent the onset of arthritis.

 

Get Up & Go Testimonials are unsolicited testimonials about how well joint supplements work.

 

Joint supplements - the mainstays - Glucosamine HCL is the foundation of all natural joint care. Chondroitin (it comes in bovine and shark cartilage forms). MSM as an anti-inflammatory. Vit C. CMO. To that - other anti-inflammatories - Boswellia, Bromelain, Yucca, Fish Oils, Wobenzym. There are other supplements that can help too.

 

Acupuncture. Massage. Acupressure.

 

Raw feeding.

 

Moderate exercise.

 

Not being fat. Showing three ribs at least, and hip bones.

 

there are homeopathic remedies to try too. These are usually tinctures.

There are Chinese Herbs to try. Always consult with a holistic vet to determine the best ones for your hound's condition.

 

Rugs on the floors. Orthopedic beds. Ramps. help getting in and out of vehicles.

 

Products are everywhere. Some better than others. Some will work better on your hound than others. Try another if one isn't working.

Make sure: High quality, tested. Best to be bought from health food stores or reputable on-line sources vs. warehouses, grocery stores.

Make sure: 1500 mgs a day of each of these - gluc, chondroitin, msm. With pills that's usually 3 - 6 pills a day.

Read the labels to make sure there is not something in the product that wouldn't be good for a dog.

These are human products, just packaged for animals. They don't have to be expensive either.

One bottle of Get Up & Go Glucosamine HCL is only $14.95.

It lasts 60 days for one greyhound at 1600 - 2000 mg of powder a day.

 

 

When I am Older Booklet is available for $2 on Gang's site. Or free at the talks I give at Gatherings throughout the year. I'll be at Sandy Paws, Greyhounds of the Bluegrass, Greyhound Gathering - Kanab 2008 and Dewey.

 

Hope this helps.

Happy New Year -

 

 

Claudia & Greyhound Gang
100% Helps Hounds

GIG Bound!

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Adequan injections.

 

I second that! Adequan injections are the only reason our 15 yr old lab mix can walk! We had him on Derramaxx and that didn't do anything, started him on Adequan shots because he was falling down like a drunken sailor all the time and with the Adequan he walks great and goes up and down stairs just fine. We buy it by the vile from the vet and my husband gives the injections every 2 1/2 weeks. I swear those shots are the only reason he can walk!

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Tramadol does have deleterious effects on kidneys and liver, and is contraindicated for those with seizure disorders -- in people, at least.

 

Both Ryan's regular vet and specialist were fine with him taking Tramadol and both said to up his dose to where he was at 100mg 3x a day. He was on that for over a month. They both know he's a seizure dog and we ask about all new meds to see that they are ok for him to take with his seizure meds.

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I'm glad to hear the endorsements for Adequan. I asked my vet about it some time ago and he wasn't at all keen to try it - he said the results were patchy at best and he didn't think it was worth it.

 

Next time I go in with Jack I'm going to say I want to try it anyway. ;)

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The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

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Tramadol does have deleterious effects on kidneys and liver, and is contraindicated for those with seizure disorders -- in people, at least.

 

Both Ryan's regular vet and specialist were fine with him taking Tramadol and both said to up his dose to where he was at 100mg 3x a day. He was on that for over a month. They both know he's a seizure dog and we ask about all new meds to see that they are ok for him to take with his seizure meds.

 

Trudy, thanks for posting how much tramadol Ryan has taken. Our Cullen's a seizure dog too, but we never asked nor were we told what the max safe tramadol amount might be. He's never had more than 3 50mg pills a day though, so I guess we are more than in the safe range! Maybe it said that on the original bottle; don't remember at this point.

 

The drugs sheets say seizures can occur with "an overdose", whatever that might be. Cullen takes it for LS when he's having a bad time.

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Guest EmilyAnne

Quick question about the Tramadol, do they prefer for your dog to be seizure free for awhile and have established some control of seizures before they will prescribe it? (Nice to know what options there are just in case)

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Ryan had a seizure while on it because his seizure meds were not making it to his liver to be processed due to all his clots around his liver. Vets were told about the seizure and there were no changes to any of his meds.

 

As far a as a max dose... I'm not really sure what that it. I was told at 50mg 3x a day was a max dose. Then our normal vet said to up it and then the specialist said to go ahead and up it again to the 100mg 3x a day.

 

Putting him on gabapentin helped him more with pain than the tramadol was... with the added benefit that he had another seizure drug in him while he was all clotted up, so we had a bit more getting processed.

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