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Guest greyladydown
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Guest greyladydown

Here's a purely hypothetical situation that I've been wondering about.

 

A greyhound has a titer for Babesia Canis of 1:320. The dog is asymptomatic, but the owner/vet decide to treat with Imizol. If the dog is tested again, say 6 months or a year later, will the titer still be positive? Will the dog ever be eligible to be a blood donor?

 

 

 

 

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They can have a positive titer after treatment. No idea as to whether folks accept a dog who's been treated as a blood donor, or under what criteria.

 

Here is some info:

 

http://www.cvm.ncsu.edu/docs/ticklab.html#babesia

http://www.cvm.ncsu.edu/docs/PDFS/ticklab/...s_treatment.pdf

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I have read tons lately on this as my girl got her first treatment yesterday. I have found conflicting information. Some say cured after treatment some say they will always have a positive titer. I am almost positive they cannot be blood donors. It was in one of the articles, I just don't remember which one.

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Here's a real life example that fits your hypo.

 

Inu was beginning the process to be a blood donor and passed just fine. At the same time (I can't remember why since he is asymptomatic) I sent his blood to a lab out west. His titer came back 1:320 (or close to that) we then sent off for a PCR at NC State and he was fine. So we continue to work with the blood donor organization.

 

Moral of the story, talk to the bank and ask them. If you are nervous about bad blood do a PCR. My thoughts.

Colleen with Covey (Admirals Cove) and Rally (greyhound puppy)
Missing my beloved boy INU (CJ Whistlindixie) my sweetest princess SALEM (CJ Little Dixie) and my baby girl ZOE (LR's Tara)

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Guest greyladydown
Here's a real life example that fits your hypo.

 

Inu was beginning the process to be a blood donor and passed just fine. At the same time (I can't remember why since he is asymptomatic) I sent his blood to a lab out west. His titer came back 1:320 (or close to that) we then sent off for a PCR at NC State and he was fine. So we continue to work with the blood donor organization.

 

Moral of the story, talk to the bank and ask them. If you are nervous about bad blood do a PCR. My thoughts.

 

 

That's interesting. The vet hospital that we work with for blood donation will automatically refuse a dog with any positive tick titer.

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While I guess I can understand where they're coming from, titers only indicate exposure, not active infection.


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Here's a real life example that fits your hypo.

 

Inu was beginning the process to be a blood donor and passed just fine. At the same time (I can't remember why since he is asymptomatic) I sent his blood to a lab out west. His titer came back 1:320 (or close to that) we then sent off for a PCR at NC State and he was fine. So we continue to work with the blood donor organization.

 

Moral of the story, talk to the bank and ask them. If you are nervous about bad blood do a PCR. My thoughts.

 

I may have this wrong, but it is my understanding that a PCR, while more reliable than a titer, is not fool-proof. It is possible to get a negative PCR from a dog with TBD if the blood sample did not contain any of the TBD organism.

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I guess that is a possible scenario but I'm not a vet. I do trust these numbers posted on the state website. I trust a PCR well above a titer.

 

Testing

• Polymerase chain reaction (PCR): Amplification of a specific piece of DNA from the

organism of interest. Since Babesia lives in red blood cells, EDTA anticoagulated

whole blood is the sample of choice for Babesia PCR testing. Obtain samples BEFORE

treatment, since treatment may reduce number of organisms and result in false negative

test results. The PCR test used by the VBDDL can detect parasitemias of 0.00000073%

or about 1300 fold fewer organisms than microscopy.

 

Edited by inugrey

Colleen with Covey (Admirals Cove) and Rally (greyhound puppy)
Missing my beloved boy INU (CJ Whistlindixie) my sweetest princess SALEM (CJ Little Dixie) and my baby girl ZOE (LR's Tara)

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Guest Zookiesmom
Here's a real life example that fits your hypo.

 

Inu was beginning the process to be a blood donor and passed just fine. At the same time (I can't remember why since he is asymptomatic) I sent his blood to a lab out west. His titer came back 1:320 (or close to that) we then sent off for a PCR at NC State and he was fine. So we continue to work with the blood donor organization.

 

Moral of the story, talk to the bank and ask them. If you are nervous about bad blood do a PCR. My thoughts.

 

I may have this wrong, but it is my understanding that a PCR, while more reliable than a titer, is not fool-proof. It is possible to get a negative PCR from a dog with TBD if the blood sample did not contain any of the TBD organism.

 

 

 

PCR amplifies DNA, so they're amplifying the DNA of babesia. If its positive IT IS there, if its negative IT IS NOT THERE. I run PCRs everyday, lol.

But as someone mentioned a positive titre indicates exposure, but a positive PCR means the babesia is present in the blood.

 

Edited because I didn't fully read the post before mine.

Edited by Zookiesmom
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