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Over-vaccinating Vet. What To Do?


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Two of my little dogs are due for the DHLPPC combo vaccine and I've been trying to research vaccines for months in attempt to not overvaccinate (esp. because my Yorkie's immune system doesn't seem to be great). You guys are the most knowledgeable people I know on vaccines and this affects Aysa too so I wanted to ask here.

 

I asked the receptionists at my vet if they'd heard of the "new" vaccine protocol and if they adjusted their recommendations to it. One told me that the dr. sees too much parvo and distemper to not vaccinate for those, so she [the dr.] probably wouldn't recommend a lesser vaccines schedule. So today I called and asked about doing a titer instead and the technician called the lab they work with and quoted me $86.25 for a titer for distemper and parvo ONLY. They don't even titer for anything else except rabies (I would agree to vaccinate for distemper and parvo as well as rabies). The tech was also adamant that bordatella should be given because she sees it regularly, I guess.

 

What on earth do I do if the lab won't even do the titer for the things I'm actually trying to avoid vaccinating for? Should I call other vets in the area and ask them about titering? My vet is probably the best in the area based on my experiences with others. *sigh*

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Well, first off, talk to the vet him/herself. Book a 15 or 30 minute slot of time and pay for it. Write down the things you want to ask so you don't forget and have a good, long chat.

 

As for what titers are available, Rabies, Distemper and Parvo are the big ones. The others are optional as vaccines, and so the lab really has no reason to titer for them. If you want to vaccinate, then do so. If you don't, then don't.

 

Lynn

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Guest smarthound

I recently took an online seminar about vaccinations that was givin by a local veterinarian who practices traditional and holistic medicine. The course is almost 2 hours long and provides information about which vaccinations are necessary and the safest method for administering them. One tip I picked up is to avoid the combo vaccines. She recommended that to avoid reactions, it's best to give the vaccines separately, at least 3 weeks apart. Even better is to give distemper one year, hepatitis the next year and parvo the next year.

 

If you're interested in the seminar, it's recorded and available for purchase. It really helped me today when I took our 3 year old in for her shots. She got rabies instead of the 5 that were recommended. The other core vaccines will be given at a later date.

Here's the website http://animalspiritnetwork.com/classes/catalog/#AnimalHealth

The class is HL102: Vaccine Insights for Holistic Animal Health

 

The other helpful resource is the AAHA 2006 Vaccination Protocol. Here is a link to their report.

http://www.aahanet.org/resources/guidelines_canine.aspx

 

 

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I'd ask long and hard about the AAHA protocol posted above and the fact that most every vet school has gone to 3 year. Everything except rabies is up to you and titers, in my book, can be very inaccurate.

 

I don't think a titer for rabies will do you any good as most states don't take rabies titers in lieu of vacination except possibly in extreme immune related circumstances.

 

I'd look for a new vet.

 

My vet is on board for 3 year with everything except lepto -- which is kind of a double edged sword as lepto alone is more than twice as much as DHLPP. :(

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I also would look for a new vet. I've found that often the old-time vets, who have been around and seen it all, are willing to work with patients on stuff like this.

 

If I were you I would follow the every 3 year protocol, and every three years give the vaccines that you believe are needed as individual shots (and not on the same day). Quite honestly, once I have done the research (which may include consulting with a vet) and decided on the plan for my dogs, I don't ask my vet for permission. I only bring the dogs in for the shots, etc. I've decided on (regardless of any reminders they send me).

 

I don't know if that really helps you at all, but be strong! Your dogs are depending on you. :)

 

Edited to add: Personally, I feel like titers have very limited use. They can come back low, when in fact the dog has sufficient antibodies (and in those cases they usually don't increase after revaccination). It seems to be almost an individual thing.

Edited by Ola
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just wondering where I could find research regarding what is exactly needed and how often

If only it were that simple. ;) There isn't really agreement throughout the industry, especially since even the vets don't always follow the recommendations of the vet associations. And as research is being done to measure how long vaccines are effective, we're learning that it's much longer than we originally thought. Of course, those studies are very expensive, especially the long ones like the 7 year rabies one being planned.

 

Generally, the consensus is vaccinating for rabies every 3 years (or as mandated by your local law, since some communities haven't updated their rules since there was only an annual rabies shot). Some other core vaccines should also be every 3 years, while other non-core shots should be given or avoided depending on how prevalent they are in your area. For example, kennel cough can be vaccinated against, but for most dogs it's not a very serious disease (much like the flu for humans). However if you are boarding your dogs it may be required. The lyme vaccine doesn't cover many of the existing strains, so it may not be much use to your dog, and it has more bad reactions than some of the other vaccines.

 

Here are some links to more reading:

http://www.vmth.ucdavis.edu/vmth/clientinf...accinproto.html

http://www.newvaccinationprotocols.com/

http://www.aahanet.org/resources/guidelines_canine.aspx

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can someone tel me what the protocol is for shots.? my vets want to vaccinate for everything every year...just wondering where I could find research regarding what is exactly needed and how often--for their safety and my wallet. thanks

 

I'm dealing with this with my vet: he insists on everything every year (including rabies) :blink: and was actually rude about the Lyme vaccine when I declined, i.e. basically saying I was neglecting my dogs by not giving them the Lyme vaccine (one was vaccinated before, had a bad reaction, and still got active Lyme anyway, so I chose not to vaccinate my other two, or continue to give her boosters). I really miss my old vet that retired. :( (I love the vet techs there though, and the other vet who left was great, but sadly, he's gone too. :( )

In vino veritas
Rachael with Rook, missing Sully, Sebau, and Diesel

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My vet started a new-er protocol of giving the combo shot one year and the rabies the next.. alternating back and forth. Bordatella, Lepto, etc... are all optional shots and it matters not to him if we opt for them.

 

That being said, because three of my four are blood donors, they are required to be vaccinated for everything every year.

Jennifer and Beamish (an unnamed Irish-born Racer) DOB: October 30, 2011

 

Forever and always missing my "Vowels", Icarus, Atlas, Orion, Uber, and Miss Echo, and Mojito.

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Check out the articles on vaccination and titres here:

http://www.caberfeidh.com/HHC.htm

 

FYI, Bordatella, lyme and lepto are bacterial and therefore the vaccinations do not have a lifelong effect like rabies, etc. can. I believe that's why there are no titres for them, b/c they do actually require frequent re-vaccination to remain effective.

 

Anyway, do read that article on titres. I took Neyla in for her annual before having read it and it had been 3 years since our DHLP vaccine, so my vet, who follows the 3-year protocol was ready to vaccinate her. We agreed on a distemper titre instead, which seemed reasonable to me until I saw the $100 charge for it on my bill! Never again. Now I know better.

 

Honestly, from what I've read, the best thing to do seems to be to give the vaccine (in our cases it would mean giving it to an already vaccinated dog) then doing a titre shortly thereafter to make sure there's been the appropriate response. Then you don't worry about it for the rest of the dog's life. I'm talking about distemper, parvo and rabies (if you can get away with it) here. That's just my two cents.

 

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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We have been on every three years except bordatella which we do every 6 months. Do your homework and make sure you have current records of your dog's medical records. If my vet insisted on annual vaccinations I would find another vet. (Rabies may still be required annually by law in some states.)

 

Edited to add...in our area lyme and lepto are not routinely given.

Edited by Greytlady94

Greyhound angels at the bridge- Casey, Charlie, Maggie, Molly, Renie, Lucy & Teddy. Beagle angels Peanut and Charlie. And to all the 4 legged Bridge souls who have touched my heart, thank you. When a greyhound looks into you eyes it seems they touch your very soul.

"A dog is the only thing on earth that loves you more then he loves himself". Josh Billings

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Guest lizmego

My greyhounds today are 11, 10, and 9. Five years ago, I decided that I didn't want to vaccinate them for anything but rabies (since it was required by law). I don't do titers either. Now, if I took my three to dog parks, doggie daycares, and boarding facilities, then yes, I would most likely vaccinate for Bordatella, Distemper, yada yada yada. But since a petsitter or my parents come to watch the grandkids when we travel (which is rare - we really need to get out more), we don't feel that these particular vaccinations are needed. If you vet is pressuring you to vaccinate, then find a new vet.

 

My vet has gone to the three year schedule of vaccinating.

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Guest Tigonie
Well, first off, talk to the vet him/herself. Book a 15 or 30 minute slot of time and pay for it. Write down the things you want to ask so you don't forget and have a good, long chat.

I agree completely! The receptionists may work there, but they are NOT veterinarians and don't have the training or expertise to give you an opinion. They can only talk about "in general" cases at best, not about YOUR dogs' specific needs! After you've had a consultation with the vet, then you can decide whether to go elsewhere or not. (This is assuming you are otherwise happy with the doctor.)

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