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Has Anyone Had A Dog Bitten By A Brown Or Black Widow Spider?


Guest SillyDog
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Guest SillyDog

I have an infestation of Brown Widow spider on my patio - pest control is coming tomorrow. The dogs and I are out on the patio all the time because it's the only way to get to the yard. Well a couple of weeks ago, Prancer developed a quarter-sized rash on his leg. I took him to the vet and got an antibiotic. I had to take him back again a week later for more antibiotic. This past Sunday I noticed Carly now has a similar rash on one of her legs. I took her in on Monday and got some antibiotic for her, too. I found is suspicious at the time that they both have a bacterial infection that look so similar, but our vet (who is grey savvy) said she really still thinks it's bacterial. Now I'm wondering if those rashes are actually spider bites. Does anyone have pictures of a confirmed widow spider bite on one of their dogs? If you do, I'd appreciate looking at it for comparison.

 

The only bites I can find online are human, and most are from brown recluses.

 

Thanks!

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I read a study not too long ago where bites that were from a known agent (widow, recluse, etc.) were shown to physicians who were asked to determine the organism that caused it. There was virtually no correlation between the two; identifying the cause from the bite was not possible.

 

Recluse (Loxosceles) bites tend to be quite severe, as you've probably seen from the images, forming deep necrotizing wounds that continue to progress, often until the flesh is debrided well into healthy tissue. I don't know how dogs react to recluse bites.

 

The Merck Veterinary Manual has some good words on the subject:

 

http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.js...mp;word=recluse

 

Among other notes:

 

Widow bites: "Unless there is a history of a widow spider bite, diagnosis must be based on clinical signs, which include restlessness with apparent anxiety or apprehension; rapid, shallow, irregular respiration; shock; abdominal rigidity or tenderness; and painful muscle rigidity, sometimes accompanied by intermittent relaxation (which may progress to clonus and eventually to respiratory paralysis). Partial paresis also has been described."

 

Recluse bites: "Systemic signs sometimes accompany brown recluse spider envenomation and may not appear for 3-4 days after the bite. Hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation are more likely to occur in cases with severe dermal necrosis. Fever, vomiting, edema, hemoglobinuria, hemolytic anemia, renal failure, and shock may result from systemic loxoscelism."

 

True recluses may or may not exist in your region; can't quite spot Austin on the map found here:

 

http://dermatology.cdlib.org/DOJvol5num2/s...al/recluse.html

 

There are ten species in the genus found in the United States, with varying degrees of potency among their venoms.

 

I do know widows quite well; when I find them, I capture and store them in jars to prevent further problems. The scorpions I round up occasionally using a black light, and contain them in a similar manner. The tarantulas, on the other hand, are generally not native, and it's only when they escape that Minerva tends to find them. (OK- that's only happened once, and it was a small guy!)

Coco (Maze Cocodrillo)

Minerva (Kid's Snipper)

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Guest SillyDog
I read a study not too long ago where bites that were from a known agent (widow, recluse, etc.) were shown to physicians who were asked to determine the organism that caused it. There was virtually no correlation between the two; identifying the cause from the bite was not possible.

 

Recluse (Loxosceles) bites tend to be quite severe, as you've probably seen from the images, forming deep necrotizing wounds that continue to progress, often until the flesh is debrided well into healthy tissue. I don't know how dogs react to recluse bites.

 

The Merck Veterinary Manual has some good words on the subject:

 

http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.js...mp;word=recluse

 

Among other notes:

 

Widow bites: "Unless there is a history of a widow spider bite, diagnosis must be based on clinical signs, which include restlessness with apparent anxiety or apprehension; rapid, shallow, irregular respiration; shock; abdominal rigidity or tenderness; and painful muscle rigidity, sometimes accompanied by intermittent relaxation (which may progress to clonus and eventually to respiratory paralysis). Partial paresis also has been described."

 

Recluse bites: "Systemic signs sometimes accompany brown recluse spider envenomation and may not appear for 3-4 days after the bite. Hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation are more likely to occur in cases with severe dermal necrosis. Fever, vomiting, edema, hemoglobinuria, hemolytic anemia, renal failure, and shock may result from systemic loxoscelism."

 

True recluses may or may not exist in your region; can't quite spot Austin on the map found here:

 

http://dermatology.cdlib.org/DOJvol5num2/s...al/recluse.html

 

There are ten species in the genus found in the United States, with varying degrees of potency among their venoms.

 

I do know widows quite well; when I find them, I capture and store them in jars to prevent further problems. The scorpions I round up occasionally using a black light, and contain them in a similar manner. The tarantulas, on the other hand, are generally not native, and it's only when they escape that Minerva tends to find them. (OK- that's only happened once, and it was a small guy!)

 

 

 

Thanks so much for posting that. I had looked in the Merck Vet Manual online and neither of my dogs showed those sorts of symptoms, but I'm still wondering about that rash. I was just wondering what a widow bite would look like on a dog. According from that study you mentioned first, I'm not sure it matters now. I just find it really odd that both of my dogs have the same bacterial skin infection -- I'm assuming it's staph because that's a common one for topical infections. I used to get really staph skin infections every August as a kid & teenager, and my dogs' rash sure does look like what I used to get, but theirs didn't radiate heat.

 

What do you do with with the widows in jars? Do you release them somewhere?

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