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Titer Test


Guest whatahound
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Guest whatahound

I asked the receptionist at my vet about it and she said it only checks antibodies for distemper and parvo. I thought it checked for more. Is that right ? :dunno

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I think you can do a titer test for various antibodies. What it checks depends on which antibodies they're testing for. Perhaps the only titer test that they offer is for distemper and parvo? I know that you can, for example, test for rabies antibodies, but it is quite a bit more expensive than the others.

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Guest FreddyGirl

My vet checked titers for ehrlichia, a tick parasite, found in certain parts of the country. It effects the blood somehow and can cause blindness. My dog is on eye drops now 1x/day and we see the opthamologist every 6 months.

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A titer is a type of serological test- a test in which the blood serum is tested- usually for antibodies.

 

Antibodies are proteins that form as a product of the immune system in order for the body to recognize and react with various components that have managed to get into the body somehow.

 

Therefore, a titer determines the concentration of antibodies in the blood. This can answer certain questions such as exposure (whether a critter has been infected) and immunity (whether a critter has a healthy degree of resistance to a given organism).

 

With ticks, a titer can demonstrate that the host has been exposed- and may still be carrying- the disease. With vaccinations, a titer will determine whether the level of immunity is sufficient to fight off the disease in the event of an exposure, i.e.: rabies. So, an animal may have rabies antibodies without ever having had the disease. Instead, we expose animals to certain portions of the killed virus such that the immune system can recognize and destroy virus particles in the event of exposure.

 

With things like tick borne diseases (TBDs), it's a bit more plastic in that antibodies mean there has been exposure- which could mean a successful defense has been made and that the disease has been purged, or that there is active or latent infection.

 

There has been some confusion with respect to dilutions. For example, 1:100 is weaker than 1:1000. The way these things are measured, the easiest way to determine the concentration of antibody is have a fixed test, and then the serum is diluted repeatedly in order to determine the most dilute the serum can be and still produce the desired response with the test. If you can dilute the serum several thousand times and still raise a response, that would indicate the antibody concentration is higher than if it could be found after diluting only a few hundred times. From an infection perspective, higher ratios are "bad." From a vaccination perspective, higher ratios are more desirable.

 

I think I have that right. Hopefully someone with more current serology than I have will chime in and correct me if I'm wrong! Been a long time since I worked plates.

Edited by ahicks51

Coco (Maze Cocodrillo)

Minerva (Kid's Snipper)

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