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Found 2 results

  1. Hi everyone, I know there are a few threads on this topic, including one I started myself, but I wanted to reach out and ask people if they have any new suggestion as to what to do with this issue. Winnie has been having reddish saliva staining/crusting issues on and off for the past three years, and I'm still not entirely sure what the culprit is. This new bout of staining has been lasting for about two months, though I haven't recently changed anything in her diet. I understand there are several theories on what causes saliva staining -like a red yeast overgrowth, bacterial infections, porphyrin oxidation, etc- but it all seems to boil down to a pH unbalance in the dog's saliva. However, I'm unsure if, if this is actually the case, I should work on making Winnie's saliva more alkaline or more acidic and if there is a safe way to do it. My gut feeling is that this is not just a cosmetic issue, and that it points at a systemic unbalance that may not be serious but should be addressed all the same. There's been a lot written on how adding low doses of supplements containing tylosin (such as Angel's Eyes) quickly fixes tear and saliva staining. Using an antibiotic long-term for cosmetic reasons seems to me like a very stupid and irresponsible thing to do, but might be confirming the idea that using other means to tweak the dog's saliva pH is the way to go. I've also read that stress can sometimes make the staining worse, which people attribute to the dog licking his/her mouth more out of anxiety, but I was wondering if the real cause might be that stress actually acidifies saliva. I was wondering if anyone had worked on using supplements to alkalize their dog's saliva, which I understand can have beneficial effects on oral health, bad breath, etc. I think I read somewhere that adding wheatgrass to the dog's food could help for that. As a side note, Winnie does have IBD, and is a quite anxious dog. We also just went through a major relocation, which she's apparently handling quite well, but who knows what's going on in her tummy... Also, gently rubbing her face with a little baking soda does help a lot with the crusting and staining, but I feel I can't really do that on her everyday without risking to damage her skin... Any thoughts? Thanks everyone!
  2. Have been browsing the forum and read about several similar cases, but there does not seem to be any real diagnose for many of them. Here is our story. Only a few weeks after I got my 2-year old grey, and in fact on the evening of the same day I had had him for a check-up to the vet, I noticed swelling under the jaw. I was not sure if it was the salivary glands or the lymph nodes but having lost my deerhound to laryngeal cancer just two months earlier I got quite concerned and we headed back to the vet’s office a few days later. Now the vet was not sure either, if it was a salivary problem/infection/blocking or if it had something to do with the lymph nodes (this struck me as a little odd, that a professional could not tell which gland it was) but anyhow we got a prescription for antibiotics. One week went by, no change, back to the vet’s, this time for needle biopsy. Samples were taken and we also got another type of antiobiotics. Let me also mention that the dog seemed perfectly healthy all the time. When results from the biopsy came back, they did not reveal anything out of the ordinary. No infection (of course he had already been on antibiotics for one week) and the cells were normal, and from the salivary gland. So, what is it? The glands are not changing in size (the size of a small grape), they are symmetrical (same size on both sides, seems unlogical that both would be blocked). A stubborn infection after all? Some sort of reaction due to changes in diet?
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