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Found 7 results

  1. Hello everyone! I have never used this site before, but am looking for some advice! Two weeks ago I brought home my very first retired racer, and he's amazing. I know there is definitely an adjustment period that can last much longer than these 2 weeks, but as a first time greyhound (and dog in general) owner I just want to make sure my new bud is doing ok. As the title of this post states, he is pretty much scared of everything (I'm assuming because everything is new to him?). Other than myself, he is terrified of nearly everyone and tries to run and/or hides behind me, whines/yelps in the morning (even after I take him out at 5:30am), is extremely reluctant to go on walks (but does great on them once I am able to get him to start walking), gets so terrified of stairs I can't even physically move his legs to teach him and he ignores any type of treat, etc. Is this normal? Is there something I can be doing to help him not be scared of really everything? I am trying to be extremely positive praise him whenever he tries to meet anyone or does anything new. Thank you in advance for the advice! Bonus question: I'm assuming like many newly retired racers, he doesn't understand the concept of toys. I tried a big tennis ball, rope, [safe] squeaker and non-squeaker plush toys, realistic toys to try to trigger his prey drive, and more, but no luck at all. The only thing he seems to like is his Kong. If you have any advice on toys either that would be much appreciated!
  2. Hello everyone! I just recently adopted a 6 year old female retired racer and brood mom with my husband. We have 3 cats and due to the dynamic fostered her for 2 weeks to see how all would go. We officially adopted her this past Sunday after seeing that she showed no interest in the cats. However, just yesterday our youngest cat (4 yrs old... the other two are 10) ran up and mad a phst noise. There was no contact but it startled our Grey. I was surprised by this and didn't respond, I wasn't completely sure what I saw. Then it happened a second time maybe about and hour later, I scolded the cat and tried to reassure the Grey... after hours of coaxing and some treats I FINALLY got our Grey to come back into the livingroom (where it happened) because she wouldn't go in there again after the second incident. All was good for a couple hours. Then the cat did the same thing but in a different room, resulting in a time out for kitty in a closed room alone. After the time out there haven't been any more issues. There was NEVER any physical contact between cat and dog but now our Grey still doesn't like to come in the living room and hasn't eaten all day. The dog will not walk into the room where the cat is and is nervous. I can hear her stomach gurgling and I know she is hungry, plus she has been trying to eat grass when she goes outside. The dog is completely fine being around the other two cats btw, this hasn't created fear of them. I am at a loss for what I should do, I am worried that maybe this isn't a good fit for our Grey, I hate the idea of her being so miserable. Thanks in advance for any and all suggestions.
  3. Hi, I've adopted my dog 3 y.o. and now we have her for about 7 months. We had to do a 18 day trip and let her in a Greyhound dog boarding. She had a really great time, the dog sitter always sent us couple of videos of her running happily with the pack. She is a fearful dog so for now this 7 months she had improved so much. Although when we picked her up from the dog boarding she was terrified with us. It seemed that she totally forgot about us, I was so sad because I have never seen her so terrified, she tucked her tail, trembled and refused to go with us. The dog sitter told us that is pretty much common when the adopters are new and the dog is fearful/timid. Is that really common? I felt we've stepped back all the results and progress. Now is hard to walk with her again, she is no longer following me, she takes times to eat, no longer play so much. She just stays at our or her bed the whole day. The dog sitter said to be patient, ignore her for a while and let her remember her routine. She is my first dog so I don't know what to expect.But I can't forget her eyes when we came to pick her, I felt like crying so much.
  4. Hi guys, As some knows, I've been posting lots of questions here, and thank for all the answers that I got, having a first rescue dog is really challenging. Sorry for long post. I adopted a sweet petit girl and now have her for almost 3 months, she is spooked. She is 3 years old. Last time we were looking for a trainer and called the rescue to have some tips, we still have troubles to take her for a walk. We live in downtown area, very noisy, crowded, lot of construction sites, etc and she still trembles and get really nervous. We also try get her used to some parks and she just doesn't sit and enjoy she is always scared. The rescue told us that we can't change it and probably she is terrified and would be better to send her back and try another dog. Truthfully, I felt offended by this recommendation.Because she made such a huge change, everyday we can see some progress, her personality is showing up little by little. I've been reading some books about fearful dogs, trying to use some techniques, luckily she is very food motivated and now we can lure her to walk with some treats before and after, but sometimes she growls, barks, cries and of course trembles like a Pinscher. We tried adaptil collars as well, no effect. I know that to her every walk must be a big deal, but the problem is taking her to outside, once she is outside her tail goes more up and she gets ok doing her path. I'm trying to make the walks longer little by little so she can get used to, but if we change sides or streets, she knows and gets really annoyed. We told the rescue that sometimes we have to literally drag her to go outside and have a walk, and they told us that we have to wait her come with us, never force anything, but if we don't do it, or try to lure her with food, she would just stay at home and pee and poop in the whole apartment. Despite that, the huge progress is at home, where she is totally comfortable, she loves cuddling, kisses, hugs, she really shows so much affection. She is very obedient and knows some commands in English and Portuguese like getting off our bed, time to eat, wait for cleaning her paws, brush teeth time, etc. I'm very impressed with her intelligence, she is good with mind games for dogs, finding hiding treats, etc. She doesn't complain when she has to take a bath, she loves massage with some oil for her dandruff, she had really bad dandruff and now she is a gorgeous black shining dog, everybody make compliments about her coat. So the question is, Am I being selfish and torturing my dog trying her to get used to walks? Is true that they have to come with us always, forcing them to go out, is it so bad? Should I get her returned? I feel that returning her is so bad, dogs shouldn't be treated like products that you just return and try another one, and we love her so much and feel she is already our family. I've been told and know that a spooked greyhound takes time to build their confidence, maybe 6 months, 1 to even 4 years, sometimes they never change and I am not willing to change her in a magical time, we love her the way she is, I am just worried cause the rescue seemed to be so sure that we should have her returned that it made me think if I am that wrong insisting in a dog that to me is so special.
  5. Hi! When I first got my pretty Katie 3 years ago, she was a spook. Terrified to leave her crate, had to be coaxed down the hallway step by step, had to be carried outside and would panic and run inside anytime ANYTHING changed, from a new sound to a bird flying to the wind blowing. It's been a long, sometimes slow, three years, but she has come along awesomely! I have done a lot of training with her, and she is on generic prozac, which definitely is helping. But one thing that can not be under-emphasized is the importance of what you are using to counter-condition your dog. I'd been using cheese, because she really seemed to like cheese, and it was relatively convenient to carry around. But then, when I hit a plateau, I talked to my trainer and she agreed that I could use chicken feet during class. Oh. My. God! What a difference! As someone wisely pointed out, if you don't see a change in behavior when you are counter-conditioning in a relatively short time, it's because the dog is either over threshold or doesn't find the reinforcer to be reinforcing enough. The first class (with cheese), Katie balked at going up the steps, and basically endured class. The first class with chicken feet, she went up the steps no problem, and was engaged and alert during class. The third class, she was standing up in the car looking out the front window as we got close to class, and made the eager whine she does for going on the greyhound walk. The fourth class, we had out at a park. Here's some pictures from that: So it is possible for these dogs to make huge improvements. I never really thought I would be able to get Katie to be this comfortable outside. My initial attempts to walk her resulted in her going into full-blown panic mode and acting like a little bucking bronco, so this is a huge improvement. Just thought other people might be needing some encouragement. I'm not really sure of the best forum for this, so a moderator can move it if they feel it should be somewhere else. Rebecca and Katie
  6. Hi! When I first got my pretty Katie 3 years ago, she was a spook. Terrified to leave her crate, had to be coaxed down the hallway step by step, had to be carried outside and would panic and run inside anytime ANYTHING changed, from a new sound to a bird flying to the wind blowing. It's been a long, sometimes slow, three years, but she has come along awesomely! I have done a lot of training with her, and she is on generic prozac, which definitely is helping. But one thing that can not be under-emphasized is the importance of what you are using to counter-condition your dog. I'd been using cheese, because she really seemed to like cheese, and it was relatively convenient to carry around. But then, when I hit a plateau, I talked to my trainer and she agreed that I could use chicken feet during class. Oh. My. God! What a difference! As someone wisely pointed out, if you don't see a change in behavior when you are counter-conditioning in a relatively short time, it's because the dog is either over threshold or doesn't find the reinforcer to be reinforcing enough. The first class (with cheese), Katie balked at going up the steps, and basically endured class. The first class with chicken feet, she went up the steps no problem, and was engaged and alert during class. The third class, she was standing up in the car looking out the front window as we got close to class, and made the eager whine she does for going on the greyhound walk. The fourth class, we had out at a park. Here's some pictures from that: So it is possible for these dogs to make huge improvements. I never really thought I would be able to get Katie to be this comfortable outside. My initial attempts to walk her resulted in her going into full-blown panic mode and acting like a little bucking bronco, so this is a huge improvement. Just thought other people might be needing some encouragement. I'm not really sure of the best forum for this, so a moderator can move it if they feel it should be somewhere else. Rebecca and Katie
  7. Hi all, I've read these forums quite frequently, but this is my first time posting. I know there that there is a list of vets recommended for greyhounds, but I was hoping someone could make a recommendation based on my specific situation. I have a very sweet but extremely fearful greyhound. She is terrified of the vet. Just as an example - last year she had to have two staples removed from a laceration on her side, and although she was heavily sedated, it took four vet techs to hold her down (she was thrashing so wildly and screaming the whole time), and she was so frightened she peed and defecated on the floor, and it took weeks for her to recover from the incident. We recently had another bad vet experience - she broke a nail at its base (the toenail that is farther up on the leg), and had to have it removed. In addition to having a similar thrashing/screaming incident, instead of just wrapping the leg at the site of the removed nail, the vet wrapped the entire foot (completely unneccesary) and wound medical tape tightly around the whole area. Not only is my grey miserable and unable to walk on the foot, now i need to go back to the vet and have the horrible experience repeated again in order to have the bandage removed. I am in desparate need of a good vet expereinced in dealing with extremely fearful dogs. I am in the Boston/Providence area and am willing to travel a good distance in order to to find the right vet who is understanding to and knows how to deal with a dog with this kind of behavior. Any advice is GREATLY appreciated. Many thanks.
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