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Found 14 results

  1. Hello! I just joined because I'm planning to adopt a greyhound soon. I'm very excited. I've read a lot about them and noticed that white cats can be particularly attractive to greyhounds because lures are often white. We have a white cat, so what I want to know is how difficult it can be to train a greyhound not to chase after her new white friend? Is it something that can just take extra time? Boo is a friendly and playful red colorpoint Siamese who used to have a disabled American Eskimo Dog as her friend. She was always gentle with him. She can get typical kitty crazies sometimes and go sprinting through the apartment, so a bit of play pretend chasing would probably make her day. Can greyhounds ever be trained to play like that while being gentle and not actually attacking her? I'm so glad for Boo's red striped tail right now. She's not 100% white. But she is mostly white. Any pointers would be so helpful. I want to make sure I am ready when the time comes for future houndie and kitty to meet. Thanks!
  2. So my partner and I are about to adopt our first dog together. We have no experience with dogs and we also don't know much about this dog either. He is a greyhound x breed. He is 1 year and 9 months old. He has not been tested with cats as the AWL don't test this. They did say he isn't suitable for a home with small furry animals but I feel like that's a bit mean to say so we are going to say we have no cats... Is that wrong? I know they just said it because of the breed he is. He is quite jumpy and I know he is practically only a puppy still so I would LOVE all the help I can get! I have done so much research about how to train a GH to tolerate and be around cats without viewing them as food haha. I know baby gates and muzzles and treats are a must!!! I also know separate rooms for a long time (as long as it takes) and I do know that I should never leave them alone together no matter how comfortable I feel. I am willing to do whatever it takes to make his life wonderful with us and our cats. He isn't a racing dog so I was thinking that makes it a little better for our situation? I don't know all I know is that I think they were being a little harsh by automatically assuming he is just going to be bad around smaller animals... So I am just after any advice and experiences you guys have had!
  3. Hi, Noob, here. My husband and I are first-time dog owners (as adults) and adopted our boy almost exactly two weeks ago. He is three and a half and his last race was in August, so he seems pretty fresh to me. He has been doing really well so far, aside from some separation anxiety that seems to be a bigger issue at night right now and our cats. Our adoption organization has been super helpful with staying in touch to check on our progress and connecting us with other people who are knowledgeable on the topic, but I'd like to get some more feedback since all of this is new territory. We were told that he passed his cat test with "flying colors." The cats have been relegated to our basement since we brought our grey home. We waited a couple of days to introduce him to the cats and went about it the way that was recommended to us by our organization. We crated one of the cats and put him on the floor, slowly approached with our muzzled and leashed grey. He almost immediate got extremely excited and started lunging while sniffing wildly so much so that he knocked his muzzle off (I think we were given the wrong one/size, I have since tightened it). I gave him some very firm leash jerks while basically shouting my deepest "NO" multiple times. We took the cat out of the room and he continued to sniff around furiously for 10 minutes while I called our adoption coordinator because we were NOT EXPECTING this reaction and we were both at this point super anxious that we had a huge issue. She informed me that he just needed to smell the cat to realize that it's not something he wants chase, but he seemed to get all the smell he needed to know that he wanted to murder this thing. She suggested that we try placing one of the cats in his crate and keep him leashed outside. I climbed in with the cat out of solidarity (this could have been a mistake, but I didn't know what else to do). He reacted just as strongly and didn't stop sniffing around his crate furiously for about 30 minutes. So we have the wind taken out of our sails big time at this point. Upon further discussion with some other grey owners, we decided to let him settle in more as he was totally out of his element. Some of the suggestions I got seemed to be more in the vein of the organic approach in which you allow the animals plenty of time and exposure until they assimilate. When the grey reacts to them, you distract him, etc... I decided that we would try to integrate this into our method which also included negative reinforcement for unwanted behaviors. Earlier this week we put up a gate in the kitchen doorway so that the cats could come up into the kitchen area without putting their lives on the line. We've been sure to be close by to monitor their interactions. Nearly every time he's seen them he has barked, lunged and gotten super amped up, but it kind of felt like maybe he was coming around a little bit and was starting to listen to us a little better, understand what "NO KITTIES" meant and we were able to break his attention toward them a little better. Cut to tonight. We thought we would test the waters a little bit. He was crated and my husband brought a kitty into the room and sat on the couch with the kitty in his lap. Immediate barking, lunging and frantic sniffing. I gave him to him good but it was hard to tell if he was responding at all. It's so weird because he hates tiny little yappy dogs as soon as he hears them and I've even been able to redirect him (seemingly better) outside when there have been squirrels and cats. It's been suggested by our organization that we allow him up close and personal interactions with the cats while leashed and muzzled, but I'm pretty hesitant to do that right now considering. I realize that this is most likely an issue that's going to take some time, but I'd like to gather as much advice because that's just what I do. We're trying really hard to not get frustrated because we realize that's setting him up for failure, but it's tricky. I would appreciate any advice or personal experience with this particular issue. I'm really hoping that this is a trainable thing and we didn't adopt a high prey drive grey (who just didn't happen to display that during his initial cat test) that will require we keep the cats separate forever.
  4. Good morning everyone! My husband and I are looking to adopt our first dog, a greyhound!!! We are so excited about it!!! Though, there is one point we need to figure out before we dive into the process. We have two wonderful (and crazy) 7 months old kitties at home. My husband and I are both work so we are gone about 9 hours everyday. We do not want to crate the dog all day long, and I do not want anything bad happening to my kittens. We also know that the association we want to adopt from cat test all their dogs. So my questions to you are: Is there any danger in letting the dog muzzled and free inside our house all day with our kitties? Or should I crate him during the day and leave him free (but muzzled) during nights? The last thing we want is to put the lives of our kittens in danger! Thank you
  5. Hello everyone! I just recently adopted a 6 year old female retired racer and brood mom with my husband. We have 3 cats and due to the dynamic fostered her for 2 weeks to see how all would go. We officially adopted her this past Sunday after seeing that she showed no interest in the cats. However, just yesterday our youngest cat (4 yrs old... the other two are 10) ran up and mad a phst noise. There was no contact but it startled our Grey. I was surprised by this and didn't respond, I wasn't completely sure what I saw. Then it happened a second time maybe about and hour later, I scolded the cat and tried to reassure the Grey... after hours of coaxing and some treats I FINALLY got our Grey to come back into the livingroom (where it happened) because she wouldn't go in there again after the second incident. All was good for a couple hours. Then the cat did the same thing but in a different room, resulting in a time out for kitty in a closed room alone. After the time out there haven't been any more issues. There was NEVER any physical contact between cat and dog but now our Grey still doesn't like to come in the living room and hasn't eaten all day. The dog will not walk into the room where the cat is and is nervous. I can hear her stomach gurgling and I know she is hungry, plus she has been trying to eat grass when she goes outside. The dog is completely fine being around the other two cats btw, this hasn't created fear of them. I am at a loss for what I should do, I am worried that maybe this isn't a good fit for our Grey, I hate the idea of her being so miserable. Thanks in advance for any and all suggestions.
  6. Hey there everybody! I made the decision a while back that I was ready to adopt a dog, and have been searching ever since for a pup who might fit in with me and my lifestyle. A friend of mine suggested greyhounds as a potential fit, and after reading through as much information as I could get my hands on, I went out to a local greyhound shelter and had to admit, they are very charming animals and I found myself very comfortable around them. That being said, I still have the average person's doubts and anxieties, and thought I might request some input from a group of people who have lived with greyhounds and know them rather well about whether or not I might make a good candidate to care for a greyhound! About me: I am in my late 20's, and live in a second-floor tenement apartment with my family, and we do . I work very nearly full time, about 6 hours a day. I'm looking for a dog that is suited to and comfortable with apartment living, which ideally would include not having a propensity for frantic, uncontrollable barking. I am hoping for a dog that would not necessarily need an "active" family- a dog that is more mellow and laid-back, but that still would not mind accompanying me on longer, slow-paced walks and hikes through the woods. I cannot engage in vigorous exercise, so I'm mostly looking for a walking buddy. I would also like to find a dog that is okay with going with me here and there- to my aunt's, my sisters, and friends' houses- and will not be stressed out by being outside of home frequently. This would include being around other dogs (smaller dogs) and cats, so it's important to me to find a pup who is small dog and cat safe. My mother also has a cat in the house, a 15 year old lovable critter who is markedly surly around dogs, which is why ideally I'd like a dog that either already ignores cats or can be encouraged/trained to ignore cats/treat them with respect. Some of the introduction methods I've read would probably not work too well on her, for example- I can't imagine her patiently allowing me to cart her in and out of the room at will for meet and greets. Normally I'd be concerned about house training, but everything I read seems to suggest that Greyhounds take to house training pretty quickly/well. I guess my major concerns are how difficult it is to tackle some of the issues that might arise, such as separation anxiety? I've grown up around family's dogs, but this will be my first experience taking care of a dog of my own, so I don't think I'd make a great match for a dog/breed of dog that requires experienced handling. I'd also like a pup that is affectionate and responsive- a good little buddy/companion. I do, of course, understand that a lot of this depends on individual pups but as I have no prior experience with the breed I figured it would be safer (and make me feel more confident moving forward) to run it by here. So, any input on whether or not a greyhound might be happy with me would be greatly appreciated, and thank you so much for taking the time to read through this! Feel free to ask anything that might help clarify.
  7. Good afternoon, all! The wife and I went through an adoption group for retired racers and were lucky enough to come home with Kingston, a 3.5 yo brindle boy. He's overall an excellent dog, walks well on the lead, obeys when we redirect him from counter surfing, and isn't overly gassy (knock on wood). He was presented to us as a cat-friendly (per the regional vernacular) dog and the foster he was with indicated he'd spent time around cats previously with no ill consequence. We've had him about 10 days now and we've kept our two little ladies (4 and 6 yo rescue cats) sequestered in the back of the house via a baby gate. We tag out to give them loves and play a bit and Kingston doesn't seem to mind when our louder girl cries (she has a big mouth in the best way). Unfortunately, on a couple of occasions the dog has walked by the gate to head downstairs where his nest is (it's much cooler and quiet), keyed on one of the cats sitting behind the fence and lunged at them. In most cases, when he looks that direction and his ears go up, we draw his attention away and reward him for the diverted gaze. When he's jumped at them, though, it's a single bounce and he goes downstairs. There's been a bark once or twice, and I don't want to discount the idea he may be trying to play, but the cats are not really used to dogs. Is our training with him, diverting the gaze and slowly acclimating him to the cats when he's muzzled and leashed, backsliding when he does this? He doesn't get fixated to the point of not moving or anything, but I want to make sure we aren't setting ourselves up for a long summer to no avail. I'm trying to stay optimistic and really I think he's doing well for the most part, but these brief jumps make me nervous.
  8. My boyfriend and I are moving in together. He has two rescued greyhounds and I have two cats. Luckily, my cats are great with dogs as they've lived with them before. The greyhounds however have only been with him since last year and have not been around any other pets before. The female was listed as cat friendly, the male was listed as not cat friendly when he adopted them. Obviously, if we had known we were going to fall in love and move in together he would have chosen differently. However, we love the greys and the cats and are wondering if there is any way on God's green earth we can blend our families without trauma and pain? I would hate to rehome the cats, but I also don't want a bad situation. Any feedback, suggestions, or advice are welcome!
  9. Hi guys I'm after some help! Here is the situation: I have two gorgeous greys. One female, 12, one male, 5. Neither to my knowledge are what you would call 'cat friendly'. Now, my fiancee is hopefully going to move into my place soon. Problem - she has two cats! So, at weekend what we plan to do is introduce them - one dog at a time to one cat at a time. Obviously we will be very very careful about this and will make sure the dogs are in our control at all times. I'm interested in anyone's experience who's done the same (i.e. bring cats into an existing grey-household). Tips, things to avoid? I appreciate it isn't going to just magically work on the first introduction but I'm not sure after this meet how to progress things. moving forward, I work from home, so if/when they all move in, I will be around to make sure they all behave! Many thanks Andy
  10. Hi, We are currently on day 3 of a weeklong "sleepover" trial period with our first grey. He came straight from the kennel, so we wanted to be able to see what his behavior is like in a home before we decide he is the one. We LOVE HIM. He has been so sweet and well behaved. We are already so attached. My question is related to prey drive outside the home. In our apartment, he has so far coexisted pretty well with our housecat. We mostly keep them separated or have him in a muzzle, closely supervised, when they are allowed to be in the same room. When she's around, he is curious, but mostly just wants to sniff her butt and go back to sleep. It is easy to break his gaze when he stares and we are hopeful they can live together peacefully (but it will take months for me to feel comfortable). When we take him outside, he is like a different dog. We walked past a sleeping cat tonight and I had to forecfully push him away as he got way too excited. Then a few minutes later, a very, very small fluffy yappy dog on a leash started barking like crazy about a half block away. He immediately froze and then started tugging and jerking HARD on his leash to get over to it. All I could think was "oh god, I hope this harness is on tight enough because if he gets out, that dog is dead." I was genuinely very rattled. I dragged him away as quickly as I could, but he was definitely on high voltage after that. I guess I should be encouraged that he allowed me to drag him off and was able to calm down in a few minutes, but I'm really nervous now. We live in an urban area and our plan was to let him run in the dog park (with a big dog area) since we don't have a yard. He'll be encountering other types of dogs and some cats daily on walks. He seems fine with big dogs that he's met in our building and on walks, but the cat and the little dog were completely different. I'm so scared that we'll turn a corner and be face-to-face with a dog he wants to kill, or that he'll be able to overpower me if he gets too excited on a walk (he's 70+ lbs). My questions for you are: Is this something that can be managed with training? What should I be doing to minimize it? He is obviously completely untrained since he is fresh off the track, so I am at square one with commands. What needs to be our training priority to get him safe for walks? Thank you!
  11. Actually the cats are not the trouble, it's the dogs. I am crying as I post this because it's so hard to see a good outcome. We have two older cats that we've had for a long time. Both hounds that have been placed with us were tested and were rated "cat friendly." We got Zoe two years ago, and she was really "cat correctable" and we worked hard, and eventually we got to the point where she was with the cats (always supervised) and would leave the cats alone. We used baby gates up off the floor as escape routes, and always crated Zoe when we were gone. We got Mika about 18 months ago, and he's very reactionary - everything sets him off, and he leaps up and runs off to look to see what's happening. He barked at the cats, and then would try to chase them. Over the last 18 months we've tried pennies in cans, spray bottles, "NO CAT" in a deep voice, and treats when he ignores the cats. He improved somewhat (no more barking), but isn't really trustworthy, so we put the baby gates down, and the cats mostly live upstairs and the dogs are gated into the downstairs. Dogs are always crated when they are unsupervised. I even took Mika to a professional trainer to work on this issue, but he completely ignored the cat that she brought in to test him. We've had a few chasing incidents over the last year - always in the kitchen, since the dogs have to pass through the kitchen from the gated area to go out the back door, and the cats have access to the kitchen. I check to make sure the cats are upstairs, and then let the dogs in. Sadly, Zoe has unlearned her tolerance for cats, since Mika taught her it was fun to chase them. Last night, I thought our cat Ellie had gone upstairs, and I let the dogs into the kitchen to go outside. Unfortunately, they found her, and Zoe grabbed her and started shaking her. I screamed at Zoe and grabbed her collar and eventually got her to drop the cat, and then Mika grabbed the cat. More wrangling as both dogs are grabbing for the cat. Ellie finally got away and ran upstairs. I put the dogs back in the crates, retrieved the cat out from under the bed, and raced her off to the vet. Fortunately, x-rays show no internal damage - though I'm sure she's sore from being picked up and shaken so hard. We are now leashing up with muzzles to go through the kitchen. Both cats haven't been downstairs at all since the incident. I can't get the image of Zoe trying to kill my cat out of my head. I contacted the adoption group, which basically said, "you've done what you can training wise. Either you have to keep them completely separated or we can rehome the dogs for you." They were gracious and sympathetic, but it's so hard to think about giving them up. But I feel I owe it to my cats to give them a safe home. Has anyone successfully lived long term with a divided household? Clearly the dogs are not cat safe, and I worry about my cats.... I am heartbroken about the idea of giving the dogs up, but also want my cats to be safe.... I feel so awful and that I've betrayed my cats by bringing the dogs in, but I also have worked so hard with both dogs on their health and behavior issues that I feel responsible and love them, too.
  12. We're 3 weeks as new greyhound owners and we have 4 cats. We really didn't know much about our dog's reaction to cats when we got him. He'd been briefly fostered (1 week) in a house with a cat and then spent 5 weeks in a prison training program. Everyone talked about the dogs being checked for cat safety, but it wasn't actually done. He came off the race track at the very end of December and by Jan 18th was in the prison program. Not much time in a house before us. We have a ranch style house with a fully finished basement. We have a half door at the top of the basement steps latched with a chain which allows cats through but not a dog. The dog is always crated in our room at night and when we're gone. Since we brought our dog CJ home, we've had the following reactions/interaction between dog and cats: 1) Blue, the kitten whom we've raised from 7 weeks and is just now 8 months (small male, mostly white, playful, fearless), seems totally acceptable to the dog & can jump and play around the dog without chase or concern. CJ has shown zero aggression toward the kitten and occasionally snuffles through his fur & wags his tail while the cat lies back and enjoys (I'm always right there for this). Blue can jump up onto a counter right in front of him, walk under the dog, even stand up against the dog's dish while he's eating with no negative response. 2) Our big male cat Pudge tends to be generally skittish but is besties with the kitten. He tentatively comes around CJ and even though the dog got surprised by him and chased the other night, Pudge wasn't particularly fazed by it. Mostly CJ ignores this cat even when both cats are playing and making a ruckus near him. 3) Our oldest cat belonged to my husband for 8 years before I met him. She was never crazy about dogs but has lived with them for the past 5 years. She used to spend her evenings on my husband's lap or nuzzled under his neck.Now she rarely comes up from the basement. We're especially careful with her because she's his baby and is declawed. We thinks she'll eventually become bolder as long as she's ignored by the dog, which he does the few times she's come around. We worried about her staying away because of her attachment to my husband, but she's getting extra attention and is eating etc., albeit in the basement. 3) Here's our biggest problem. They're all tuxedo cats but this last girl, Rosalie, is small & very fluffy. She's also skittish in general and even though she's only 5, had major health problems for 4 years which were just resolved last Fall. Something about this cat makes our dog want to eat her. She doesn't come upstairs at all now, but lies at the top of the basement steps where the dog can see/smell her. We've tried an introduction with the dog muzzled and squirted when he gets excited, but he barks/lunges at this cat and I'm sure she'd be a meal if he could get her. Fortunately, the stress hasn't caused a recurrence of her health issues. Her growling and hissing at the dog just seems to incite him. It has us very discouraged tonight. Are some cats just more attractive or feed a prey drive more than others? Will we ever be able to get this worked out or is he just not a cat-safe dog? Other than this, he is a nearly perfect dog and we've grown very attached to him. Thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
  13. Hello, I recently adopted my first greyhound from an adoption agency and was informed that he was cat safe and low prey drive. He has always seemed interested in my cat who does not have the temperment to swat at him but instead prefers to maintain distance and slowly retreat. When she jumps over the baby gate that creates a safe room for her, he would initially get up and chase her back into the bedroom. Lately he has gotten better with their interactions but I always keep him on a leash when allowing him in the cat safe room for meetings. I recently went to a local dog park during off hours so we could run around when no other dogs were there. There was a boxer/pitbull mix and they played/danced for a minute and then hung out together very peacefully. Then a small white fluffy dog came into the large dog area off leash. I immediately put a leash on him upon seeing the small dog knowing that I had only had him three weeks and did not know him enough to entirely trust him with anything. The dog quickly approached him as we were trying to exit and without any signs of agrresion (growling, barking) he lunged at her and caught her lip. I had to pry his mouth open to release the dog's lip. There was no damage done but for a loss of a few hairs and my trust in his low prey drive status. He was then completely fixated and would not divert his gaze from the small dog. He even tried to get out of the car as we drove away to get back to the dog. I am not naive enough to think he wanted to apologize for his malfeasant (it's not his fault but my own and the other dog's owner). I am now rethinking his status with my cat knowing that he has this switch that can be triggered so easily. Everyone I know also has small dogs. After talking to the adoption agency they want to re-home him and switch dogs but I would like to be completely informed before I make such a large life decision for both of us. I put his and my cat's needs before my own and want what is best for them. I know that training does not trump prey triggers, but does not small dog safe always equal not cafe safe, or is there a complex stimulus discrimination that would allow him to live peacefully with a cat but not small dogs? He also has pretty bad seperation anxiety and cries for ten to fifteen minutes after I leave. He has been on a very strict schedule for over a month and knows it enough that he crates himself at the appropriate times when I should leave for work. I have tried systematic desensitization (alone training) and putting an old worn shirt of mine with him in his crate. I also ignore him for ten minutes before I leave and ten minutes when I get back. I can't try flooding and just let him bark it out most times because I live in an apartment with close neighbors. We also go to a soccer field and run/race every morning before work so he is tired (he is still very athletic). Does the not small dog safe and having a cat, as well as the seperation anxiety warrant switching dogs as the adoption agency wants? It might prevent possible future tragedy and angry neighbors but I am trying a lot at my disposal to make this work because I have become attached to him. What is best for him and the cat comes first though. He was a modest winner at the track before an injury sidelined him. I'm not sure if that helps in trying to understand his psyche better.
  14. ...did you feel safe leaving your grey(s) and cat(s) loose in the house together when you're not home, if ever? We've had Sweep for four months now, and we always crate her overnight and when we're gone. I work from home, so other than overnight, she's rarely crated for more than two or three hours at a time. When we're home during the day, she's unmuzzled and has the run of the house, and we are just super-mindful of where everyone is at any given time. (Not too difficult when we have three velcro pets!) We feed them separately and at different times and have had no issues in that area. Sweep mostly ignores the cats, but she isn't scared of them. She watches them sometimes and seems curious, but doesn't get fixated and has never lunged, chased, drooled, or given any signs of aggression. She play-bowed to the female cat once, but the cat wasn't having any of that and Sweep gave up easily. She has growled at our male cat on a few occasions: once when he got too close to *our* dinner--yummy, stinky barbecue--and I suspect she was either jealous or correcting him; once when she got too close for his comfort and he swatted her; and again just the other night when she had had her first dose of Comfortis and clearly was feeling rotten and didn't want him getting close. (Both cats generally keep their distance, but this was a tight quarters situation and the cat had to pass her to get into the room...not the typical setup but we had just had Easter company. She's not usually space-aggressive, but as I mentioned, she obviously felt crummy--was fine the next morning.) I recognize the growling for what it is and don't reprimand her other than a firm "no kitty" when appropriate, but I still worry about a situation escalating in our absence. I guess as long as she continues to crate well, I shouldn't stress about it, but I am curious if there's a light bulb moment where you realize the cats are perfectly safe (well, 99%; I know there are never any guarantees). I am definitely not there yet, but would like to think I will be in time. TIA.
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