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  1. It's time to start another thread as we come near to 50 pages on the previous thread. Below is information to help you make choices for yourself and your family, originally posted and collected by NeylasMom. This is the fifth sixth seventh eighth ninth in a series of threads. The original was started by a few people whose pups were diagnosed around the same time in July of 2010, but it appears it has grown into an ongoing thread that will provide both information and emotional support for anyone who has dealt with losing a pup to osteo, is currently caring for a pup diagnosed with osteo, has one that has been newly diagnosed, or worries they may have to deal with it in the future. You do not have to have a pup that currently has osteo to join in this thread - feel free to stop by if you've ever lost a pup to osteo or other cancer, would like to offer support to those currently dealing with this disease, would like to prepare yourself for the possibility of dealing with this, or if your pup has been diagnosed recently. We've even had a person or two join in whose pups were diagnosed with other forms of cancer. Basically, anyone is welcome although we'd prefer there be no reason to have to welcome anyone or for this thread to exist at all. General Websites (These have not been updated recently and so may not reflect current thinking and research, but are a good place to begin): Bone Cancer Dogs site - An excellent place to start to get general information about osteo, treatment options, etc. http://www.bonecancerdogs.org/ Journal article on pain mgt - Technically an article on using radiation for palliative (pain management) care, but includes a good overview of the types of bone cancer pain and the various ways to treat it including medications, radiation, and IV pamidronate). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1482437/ Dog Cancer Blog - Blog from Dr. Dressler, a vet who has dedicated himself to cancer treatment in dogs - includes lots of useful information via blog posts, as well as a link to purchase his book (which covers all aspects of cancer care, both holistic and traditional) in a downloadable format. http://www.dogcancerblog.com/ The previous osteo threads, the original http://forum.greytalk.com/index.php/topic/258306-osteo-diagnosis/ and part II http://forum.greytalk.com/index.php/topic/267277-osteo-thread/ With over 100 pages of useful information and support, this is a good place to get specifics if you are wondering about a specific holistic regimen one of us used, the decision making process for choosing amputation or palliative care, etc. For inspiration and some laughs: Winslow's diary http://forum.greytalk.com/index.php/topic/169522-winslows-diary/ For those considering amputation, BigOrangeDog's blog about what to expect. https://minnesotagreyhounds.wordpress.com/what-to-expect-with-a-leg-amputation/ Yahoo groups where you can go for information and support (These are closed groups but they appear to be active): Dog Bone Cancer Group - not greyhound specific, but a good source of information and support specific to osteosarcoma https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/bonecancerdogs/info Circle of Grey - a greyhound specific support group for owners of pups dealing with all kinds of health issues https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/CircleofGrey/info?yguid=278897955 Artemisinin and Cancer - for those who would like to pursue artemisinin as part of their treatment regimen, neither greyhound nor osteo specific https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/artemisinin_and_cancer/info Unfortunately, the Greyhound Health and Wellness Program at OSU has been discontinued. They may be continuing to send out free chemotherapy for the time being, this is not clear from the information on their website. Here is the address for the new website if you would like to contact them. http://vet.osu.edu/vmc/companion/our-services/greyhound-program Dr Guillermo Couto has moved and begun his own consulting business for greyhounds with cancer. If you join the Greyhound Health Initiative they will do 1/2 price consults and (possibly) be able to send free chemo drugs. Here is the web address for his new site: http://www.coutovetconsultants.com/for-ownersadopters/ Greyhound Health Initiative (Hope 4 Hounds) http://www.greyhoundhealthinitiative.org/ AVMA ANIMAL HEALTH STUDIES DATABASE This site has a searchable database of all research studies being conducted investigating treatments or doing research. https://ebusiness.avma.org/aahsd/study_search.aspx?utm_source=vanity&utm_medium=findvetstudies&utm_campaign=aahsd&utm_term=print&utm_content=javma Here is a link to Charlie'sDad's blog about their cancer fighting regimen - Charlie survived an incredible 4 years following his amputation using these natural foods and supplements. http://pinneyandpnut...ancer-diet.html
  2. This may be being posted for a second time because I cannot find my first post. If it is a duplicate, I apologize. If this post comes across cold, it is not meant to, it just is the way I type because of the business I am in. Unfortunately, my business is very fact oriented and I have gotten accustomed to typing that way. My 12.5 year old baby, Charlie, has been diagnosed with stage 3 lymphoma. I am bound and determined to do everything possible for him to stay alive so long as he has a good quality of life. Timeline: 4/26/18 - had blood work done and he was in perfect health (including his teeth). 6/9/18 - my boyfriend felt some lumps in my baby's neck that were not there a few days before (we check him over as a habit as we are petting him). 6/10/18 - took Charlie to the vet had an aspirate done of the lymph nodes behind his knees. 6/12/18 - the aspirate comes back as "inconclusive; however, high probability of large cell lymphoma). 6/14/18 - went to the oncologist and he has been diagnosed with stage 3 lymphoma and started him on the CHOP treatment with the first chemo treatment 6/14. He had lost 3 pounds between 4/26 and 6/10, but had put them back on as of 6/14. I have a some questions that I'm hoping my fellow greyhound owners will be able to help me with. Does anyone know of a vet oncologist that is located in the South Florida area and either specializes in greyhounds or is very knowledgeable with greyhounds and cancer treatment? I know greyhounds have certain differences from other dogs (i.e. bigger heart, different normal blood level ranges, etc.). Does anyone know if there is a different and more successful treatment when it comes to lymphoma? My research has shown that chemo is the best treatment for lymphoma, but I don't know if there is anything that can be added to the CHOP treatment that can make it more successful in beating lymphoma in greyhounds. I want to treat his body as a whole and not just do chemo as treatment and hope for the best. Does anyone have any diet recommendations? I currently have Charlie on Merrick grain free texas beef and sweet potato as a dry food. Meal toppers include turkey, pork, beef and beef hearts (yes, I know that beef hearts are part of the beef category, but they are his favorite, so I felt the need to mention them separately). I make sure that I trim off as much as the fat as I can because I don't want him to have pancreatitis. After dinner desserts are beef marrow bones and either fat free plain yogurt or fat free plain greek yogurt. Treats are either chicken hearts or chicken gizzards (can you tell he's spoiled yet?). After my initial vet told me he suspected lymphoma, I started Charlie on vitamin c (500 mg 2x daily), b complex (1 daily) and fish oil (1 daily). Does anyone have any other ideas for supplements? I've seen some comments on websites saying turmeric helps as well; however, my current oncologist doesn't want to give him too may antioxidants because of the chemo. Anyone have any other ideas? My baby and I have been through a lot and I refuse to give up without a fight. Any ideas to fight this horrible cancer would be most appreciated.
  3. Before we talk about canine vaccination schedules, first let's talk about poop! You'll have to excuse my french as I'm a retired RN and BM's are very near (but not so dear) to me! Let's just say that although some of this post may be speculation, poop analysis is my specialty! I fostered 3 retired racers (from Florida) over the last 4 months and adopted #4... GM's Felix! (I failed at fostering as they say!) Interesting fact: All of the 4 dogs had (and have) EXACTLY the same bowel patterns (progressively worse diarrhea as the day progresses.) No matter what I fed (feed) them. They all have a normal formed poop first thing in the morning. By noon, it's porridge. By 3 pm, it's syrup. By evening it's liquid. By night-time it's water.... You get my drift.. They ALL poop 3-8 times a day (as above) depending on how much you walk them / provide access. None have pooped inside the house. And still no change with Felix. All of these dogs came to me approximately 1 month after a neuter/spay, dental, 6 inoculations and heart worm tx. More interesting facts: From my research, I found that the rabies shot and COMBO shots are the worst offenders, and most associated with auto-immune disorders, seizure disorders, auto-immune thyroiditis, allergies, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Crohn's and cancers. Studies show that the rabies vaccine causes (yes CAUSES!) auto-immune thyroiditis (specifically). Felix (the greyhound I adopted) has hypo-thyroid and is symptomatic (VERY BAD dry flaking skin and thyroid pattern bald thigh syndrome). In fact, he doesn't have any hair on at least 1/3 of his body (underneath and sides). I've had his thyroid panel done and he IS hypo-thyroid as I suspected (and not "low normal" .. out of range.) I'm taking him back to the vet to get a TgAA in a few days. (I asked for a full canine thyroid panel but they didn't test for auto-immune antibodies even though I asked them to .. sigh!) I understand that some greyhound specialists think that sighthounds low thyroid levels, hair loss or hair pattern and bald-thigh syndrome are "normal for a sighthound". It is far more likely, however, that US race-track greyhounds are a large population within the sighthound breed and their low thyroid levels are impacting the numbers for the entire breed. MANY US retired racing greyhounds thyroid levels are outside of normal range. And I have yet to meet one who doesn't have bald thigh syndrome. Does that make these things normal? I don't think so. I think if we were to test all of their TgAA levels, we would see that a very large number of cases are in fact auto-immune thyroiditis from over-vaccination and this is NOT genetic. I understand that vaccination is a controversial subject but I think we really need to take a look here. Because there are some very troubling research studies that aren't being considered. I think that financial incentives, AVMA politics and lack of knowledge are all at play. And can explain why vaccine schedules have changed so dramatically over the years (adding more vaccines more often) without good studies proving necessity, SAFETY or effectiveness. I also find the number of seizure disorders amongst greyhounds very troubling. And again, I believe over-vaccination is to blame for this. Without writing a novel here (I'll spare you all the misery!), why for example is our Canadian rescue group vaccinating for rabies when it's not mandatory and rabies is so very rare? Sure rabies is a horrible disease but here in BC, it is estimated that 0.5 % of a rare bat breed has rabies. That's it. No rabies cases have ever been detected in our racoon, skunk, squirrel, coyote, cougar, bear or lynx. There have been 8 documented cases of rabies in the last 50 years in BC, ALL of which were traced back to this particular breed of bat. On the other hand, all of the 6 canine vaccines list seizures as a side-effect and this is a COMMON and serious side-effect. We have 2 greyhounds currently in foster, both of which had grand mal seizures less than 24 hours after receiving their 6 vaccines at the vet. One of which has notable neurological damage (abnormal gait, can't walk ... hops etc.) Back to poop! I think the problem is that when all the dogs have the same problem, one starts to accept that as a NORMAL pattern instead of looking at what might be causing ALL the dogs to have the SAME problem. ALL the US track dogs are cared for in a similar fashion and vaccinated on the same schedule. I know the other Vancouver foster thinks that since all the dogs get diarrhea as the day goes on, this is normal for a greyhound. I don't think so. I think that 6 vaccines administered all at once (all in one day) causes an immune mediated inflammatory response including the production of auto-immune antibodies (antibodies that attack healthy endogenous tissues like with Crohn's disease and auto-immune thyroiditis.) Simply put, the immune system is kicked into over-drive and goes haywire. Vaccination was developed in the 1930's and became a public health initiative in the 40's. We have more than enough studies now in 2017, proving that the vaccination risk to benefit ratio is not only dismal but we should have moved forward from this kind of backwards thinking decades ago. (Ie: the research and development of immune system boosters instead of attacking it with attenuated AND live viruses!) I won't even go into the carcinogenic additives and toxic heavy metal adjuvants that are injected directly into the bloodstream, by-passing all of the body's natural barriers. There is NOT 1 SINGLE STUDY in humans or dogs comparing disease prevention in a vaccinated population compared to an unvaccinated population. The production of anti-bodies in response to an inoculation is NOT synonymous with immunity. An immune response involves thousands of factors, all of which play a role in preventing disease. Yet, this is all that is tested for to cite "effectiveness". Again, I'll spare you too many details. But, If you have any information about this topic (does your dog have symptoms of hypo-thyroid? inflammatory bowel disease? seizures? or cancer?) Please PM me. I would like to gather together as much information as possible, especially about auto-immune thyroiditis and hypo-thyroid in greyhounds with a view to contacting Dr. Dobbs, DVM (who specializes in canine thyroid problems and advocates for an alternative, safer vaccination schedule.) And if you made it all the way here, thanks for your time and patience!
  4. Hello everyone! I am writing to seek advice. My 11 year old magyar agar got very sick (hungarian greyhound and we living in hungary). He is called Buki, just as Bambi (in an other thread) was diagnosed via MRI scan with a brain tumour (probably a meningioma) and hydrocephalus (water on the brain). The tumor approximately 2cm large. On monday it looked we lost him, he woke up in a terrible condition, couldn't walk and very confused eyes he had, tremor from pain and being scared probably. It was a great shock, the evening before we took a nice walk and he vas happy, well, little running playing as usual. MRI clarified the diagnosis. The doctors helped a lot, they are good to us. They say the tumor too big and too diffusive to be operated. We started the steroid and he got a lot better, now walks quite fine again and has a great appetite as always. Sleeps even a bit more, and getting all the treat I can give him. I have some time to spend with him at home in the autumn, work at home quite much (not all the time). I have reed all the comment in the other thread about the same, and it give me some hope to be with him still for a bit. I don't know how to prepare myself to take care as best as possible for him in the time we still can have together. If you have any suggestion how can I do better, or any experience similar to learn from, I am glad to hear. 5 days ago he looked so healthy for his age, he still looks incredible good: https://www.instagra...p/BYLfrNVgOEc And an older picture, here he is around 4-5 year old: And many of our nice moments in pictures here: https://www.facebook.com/renatadezso/media_set?set=a.1240125639528.2038039.1120893346&type=3
  5. In their April 2017 newsletter, UW Veterinary Care announced the following clinical study: They have a number of other oncology studies, too: https://uwveterinarycare.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/April-2017-SA-Patients-Needed-for-Clinical-Studies.pdf
  6. Well, I've written a few times about my 11 year old girly's health issues in the past few months. One, probably IBS and acute pancreatitis and one year out from thyroid cancer diagnosis. She stopped eating much of anything this weekend. I've been hand feeding her on her bed and she usually eats, not always. I've tried scrambled eggs, canned dog turkey/veggie mix, cooked turkey burger, and depending on how she feels, she'll either eat or not. Today, I got her to eat a cooked ground turkey patty. She ate it with gusto, but with minutes was panting heavily for at least 15 minutes. (She is heat intolerant and was lying out on the deck in the sun even though temps are in the 30s). Sadly, I think this may be her time. She looks so uncomfortable and I'm a wreck from not sleeping well last night with another night of interrupted sleep of 2 hours then 4 waking up when she needed to go out. Her bowels have changed from semi-solid to mostly very soft. She's drinking a lot of water, too. Tramadol 2x/daily is being given including her daily Omeprazole. The panting has been ongoing for months, but has really accelerated. Her quality of life is diminished.
  7. Hello All While walking our girls recently, someone stopped to admire them ( happens often ) but dropped this little nugget before moving on: martingale collars can cause throat cancer in greyhounds who sometimes pull from their neck. We have a harness and used it on our big boy Lander, before he passed. If there is any truth to this at all we will purchase another and Put Frannie and Chloe in them to walk. They are good walkers about 75% of the time but you know how it is, sometimes we're just out of our minds with excitement and act a bit crazy...... Has anyone ever heard of this cancer issue?
  8. So, I have often wondered why we don't leave the ovaries when we spay our female greyhounds, since research is indicating how important it is to a woman's health to keep her ovaries, if possible. Today, I found the following discussion about ovary-sparing spay for dogs, especially in large or giant breeds, by the Parsemus Foundation. Here is the link: https://www.parsemusfoundation.org/projects/ovary-sparing-spray/ If there are hormonal benefits to keeping the ovaries that include less incidence of devastating illnesses such as various cancers, as well as many other diseases, why haven't I heard more about this? I do see that keeping ovaries may be linked to mammary tumors, so there may be positive and negative consequences of partial spay that need to be watched. But, it sounds like the positives may greatly outweigh the negatives. My one question is will a greyhound with an ovary-sparing spay still go into season just like an intact female (without the major discharge, of course)? They also discuss vasectomy as a healthier option for males. Does anyone out there have any experience with this? Opinions?
  9. It's been one month since I've written about our 11 yr old Deedee who was dx'd with thyroid cancer in January. For several months she been a picky eater. I wrote about this in another post "Picky eater & cancer". However, since last week, she's been eating much less. When she does consume food, I.e. this evening it a few pieces of BBQ chicken, few pieces of scrambled egg, and mostly PB on bread, she would start panting. She tummy gurgles. She gets 2 Pepcid daily along with daily meds (Chlorambucil, fish oil 3x/daily mail Pentoxifylline 3x/daily, 38 mg Deramaxx, and Tramadol 2 X/daily Prn. Oh, and the gas..... Chlorambucil can cause severe GI distress and damage, according to a few med descriptor sheets. I'm ready to stop it and observe if things improve. Obviously, she's consuming more meds than food. I'm at a crossroads with her. Her quality of life has diminished. Few walkies and if so, they're very short. She has a few corms that are really bothersome, but they do get dremeled. Off to the vet again for another eval or end of life decision? What's even more difficult is that my husband & I return to school Monday which will be a schedule change. .....she's not panting now.......
  10. It's time to start another thread as we come near to 50 pages on the previous thread. Below is information to help you make choices for yourself and your family, originally posted and collected by NeylasMom. This is the fifth sixth seventh eighth in a series of threads. The original was started by a few people whose pups were diagnosed around the same time in July of 2010, but it appears it has grown into an ongoing thread that will provide both information and emotional support for anyone who has dealt with losing a pup to osteo, is currently caring for a pup diagnosed with osteo, has one that has been newly diagnosed, or worries they may have to deal with it in the future. You do not have to have a pup that currently has osteo to join in this thread - feel free to stop by if you've ever lost a pup to osteo or other cancer, would like to offer support to those currently dealing with this disease, would like to prepare yourself for the possibility of dealing with this, or if your pup has been diagnosed recently. We've even had a person or two join in whose pups were diagnosed with other forms of cancer. Basically, anyone is welcome although we'd prefer there be no reason to have to welcome anyone or for this thread to exist at all. For those who have recently had a pup diagnosed with osteo, here is some information to hopefully get you started: Bone Cancer Dogs site - An excellent place to start to get general information about osteo, treatment options, etc. Journal article on pain mgt - Technically an article on using radiation for palliative (pain management) care, but includes a good overview of the types of bone cancer pain and the various ways to treat it including medications, radiation, and IV pamidronate Dog Cancer Blog - Blog from Dr. Dressler, a vet who has dedicated himself to cancer treatment in dogs - includes lots of useful information via blog posts, as well as a link to purchase his book (which covers all aspects of cancer care, both holistic and traditional) in a downloadable format. The previous osteo threads, the original and part II, with over 100 pages of useful information and support. This is a good place to get specifics if you are wondering about a specific holistic regimen one of us used, the decision making process for choosing amputation or palliative care, etc. For inspiration and some laughs: Winslow's diary For those considering amputation, BigOrangeDog's blog about what to expect. Yahoo groups where you can go for information and support: Dog Bone Cancer Group - not greyhound specific, but a good source of information and support specific to osteosarcoma Circle of Grey - a greyhound specific support group for owners of pups dealing with all kinds of health issues Artemisinin and Cancer - for those who would like to pursue artemisinin as part of their treatment regimen, neither greyhound nor osteo specific Unfortunately, the Greyhound Health and Wellness Program at OSU has been discontinued. They are continuing to send out free carboplatin chemotherapy for the time being in 2014. Here is the address for the new website if you would like to contact them. http://vet.osu.edu/vmc/ghwp Dr Guillermo Couto has moved and begun his own consulting business for greyhounds with cancer. Here is the web address for his new site: http://vet.osu.edu/vmc/ghwp I've left the OSU contact info in place for this thread for information only, but it should be removed in subsequent editions. For those interesting in contacting OSU for a consult, second opinion, appointment, or amputation: Greyhound Health and Wellness Program Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine 601 Vernon Tharp Street Columbus, Ohio 43210 Phone: (614) 247-6757 or (614) 247-8490 Email: greyosu@osu.edu Website: http://www.vet.ohio-state.edu/GHWP.htm (registration and fee now required to get full access to this site) For a consultation, you must use the online consultation service found here. You can sign up for full access to the website ($99 per calendar year) or donate through the giving page on the website. If you decide to donate, you can double your money by giving through the Greyhound Project. They will match the funds that you donate. Just go to this website and scroll down to the appropriate donation button: http://www.adopt-a-g...g/donate.shtml. Keep in mind that OSU does 20 to 30 greyhound consults a day along with all of their "in canine" patients. Depending on their workload there may be a wait for the consultation. If you are contacting them on an emergency basis, please let them know. If you want to make an appointment to be seen in person/canine, you can call the main number to set up a date/time. The main number for the veterinary hospital is 614-292-3551. This information is also on the consultation service page. If you decide to visit OSU please contact Jane (joejoesmom). She may be able to put you up in a local home, provide moral support, or just help with logistics: Finewhipador-drool@yahoo.com[/i] If you wish to help further osteosarcoma research, 2 labs that are collecting samples and have specifically requested greyhound samples: Modiano Lab - Need tissue from a biopsy and blood; will send a collection kit and a prepaid return mailer; also accepting samples for hemangiosarcoma and lyphoma Website: http://www.modianola...nfo_index.shtml Contact person: Mitzi, 612-626-6890, lewel001@umn.edu Broad Institute - Blood samples only, may be able to help with shipping costs, but they prefer you cover them Website: http://www.broadinst...sending-samples Contact info: dog-info@broadinstitute.org, FAX: (617) 324-2722 Both labs require signed consent forms and samples must be shipped overnight. Here is a link to Charlie'sDad's blog about their cancer fighting regimen - diet and supplements. http://pinneyandpnut.blogspot.com/p/charlies-cancer-diet.html
  11. Hi all. One month ago our sweet grey, Murphy, was diagnosed with multi lobular osteosarcoma (MLO). Fortunately the cancer was localized to his mandible. After many consultations with the surgeon we decided to proceed with the partial jaw amputation. Murphy's recovery has been difficult. He has managed to learn how to eat soft foods and is finally gaining some weight. The larger issue is he does not sleep well, especially at night. He is constantly roaming around,shaking and just standing in odd places (ie. Our bathroom). After speaking with his surgeon we have taken him off all medications. We were hoping it was the Trazadone making him anxious but it has been over a week and no change. He does not appear to be in pain but very anxious/unsettled. Has anyone dealt with similar signs/symptoms post amputation? My husband and I are at a loss. Murphy is 10 and we very much want him to enjoy what's left of his golden years.
  12. I just read about 3 studies on osteosarcoma that are currently being conducted at UW-Madison. I hadn't heard of the first (administration of rapamycin after carboplatin), so that's interesting. Also, if you're in the Madison area and qualify for one of these studies, it could help offset the cost of surgery and/or treatment. For more information, see https://uwveterinarycare.wisc.edu/clinical-studies/oncology/
  13. Hi everyone, I was referred here from my local greyhound forum. I've been looking through some past posts and it looks like a greyt place! Our Oni has a lump on her wrist. It started out kind of mushy (inflammation I guess), then the mushiness went away and we were left with a hard bony lump that is different from the other side. We took her to the vet who felt a bony protrusion and then we, got an x-ray. The vet said he couldn't see the bone degeneration typical of cancer, but that it could be that it's too early to show. Other than that he saw something that looked like it *could* or *could not* be a fracture that could cause swelling. He gave us Meloxicam for 5 days and said that if it's a fracture the swelling will go down in a few days and the wrist will look the same as the other wrist. He said that if it doesn't go down, we must watch and see if it gets bigger and if so, take her in for more x-rays. It hasn't gotten smaller and it hasn't gotten bigger. The swelling comes and goes in that sometimes it's mushy, and sometimes it's hard, but it doesn't really get bigger and the bony hard part hasn't increased in size that we can see. There are NO signs of pain, she's just as happy and playful as always, she has the same monster appetite ) She doesn't lick at the area, no limping. None of her usual signs of pain. Of course we're worried about osteo.. we feel like we're groping around in the dark about this. In case it's a fracture that still needs time to heal: For humans, we take advil for inflammation. We can self medicate to a degree. Does anyone know what kind of over the counter medications I could use for inflammation? Also, any recommended medications we should have in our doggy medicine cabinet just in case? Is it possible for her not to feel pain if it's cancer? When would she start to feel pain if it is cancer? Does anyone know if it's realistic for the swelling to go down to normal from a fracture after just a few days? I've heard these things take a while to heal. She also did an unplanned zoom around the yard the day before yesterday. We'll take her out on leash from now on. Thanks anyone and everyone for any input or advice you can give. Abby, Jason, & Oni
  14. Has anyone read and/or used this book?? It seems to be really comprehensive and mostly up-to-date. I'm going to get it and will update afterwards, but wondered if anyone else already has?
  15. To see pictures go to this link please: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/drn22svwfrhhtz4/TD3PH9F3eU#/ Hello, We need some advice with our 5-year-old greyhound. He started to limp sometimes at the beginning of last year (front right leg). We initially thought he injured himself when running or something like that. He stopped limping after maybe 2 weeks. Then he started to limp again approximately 6 months or so later. This limping went on and off. Sometimes it was better sometimes worse, sometimes it stopped etc. In January this year we went to see our vet because he started to limp again and it seemed worse than before. The vet took leg and chest x-rays. There was a lytic bone lesion present in the elbow area (pictures attached). Chest was clear, the vet diagnosed it as most probably some kind of bone cancer, he was thinking of osteosarcoma. He said we needed to do biopsy. We said that what if it was a valley fever presenting itself in the bone since our grey was originally form Tucson, Arizona. He said that he didn’t think so, that it’s very rare etc etc and that, in any case, if it was valley fever, it would also show with biopsy. He gave us pain medication – tramadol, and anti-inflammatory drugs – onsior. So okay. Biopsy was done. They took multiple samples even used Jamshidi to take a sample. Vet said he was surprised how hard the bone was he expected sponge-like consistency which wasn’t there at all. Biopsy results came – all negative. No inflammation, no malignant cells, nothing. But our vet assured us he took good and enough samples. Also, I forgot to mention the blood work. Also in norm (I’m attaching the results). So then our vet was confused. He consulted this with his colleagues, they weren’t sure what it was. We waited four weeks, our baby on tramadol, and went for an x-ray again, cause by this time there should be a change to worse if it was a cancer. No change. We decided to consult other vet he said it might be bacterial osteomyelitis, so we tried clindamycin treatment for 6 weeks with no pain medication to see if there was an improvement. We felt that our grey was cheery and playful, although it was hard to say if it was because of the antibiotics since he was considerably down after the biopsy, in pain and looked sad. So it might have been just the fact that he was healed now. After 6 weeks we went for another x-ray. No change. Not worse but not better either. So our vet said he didn’t recommend continuing on clindamycin. But he still doesn’t know what’s wrong. He says it might be some kind of non-malignant tumor or something, or maybe some pathological bone changes due to some old injury we don’t know about. We are very frustrated because we paid lot of money with no result and we know our baby is in pain and discomfort. Even though he is in very good mood he won’t step on his right front leg if he doesn’t have to, he is sensitive to the touch in that area if you put your hand in his armpit area. He is also sensitive if you would bend his leg in the elbow (although he keeps the leg slightly bended when he stands) Other than that, he eats normally, he didn’t lose any weight and as I mentioned before, he is in good mood and wants to go for walks (because for example after the biopsy he barely walked of course and he didn’t want to go for a walk at all) Please if you have any advice, we really don’t know what to do. Thank you! To see pictures go to this link please: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/drn22svwfrhhtz4/TD3PH9F3eU#/
  16. After losing our two previous greys to cancer at ages eleven and seven, we hoped that Lola would be the one who would live to a ripe old age. She is only seven years old and suddenly started limping a few days ago. Our previous greys had less common forms of cancer than osteosarcoma, but I knew that a limp with no visible injury is never a good sign. We took her to the vet and they did a series of x-rays. Our vet noticed some arthritic creaking in the joints, but not a lot. When the leg x-rays did not show anything, she kept examining and probing to find the sore spot. She had of course already examined the paw and toes, but finally touched Lola's toe in such a way that made her shriek. She did another x-ray of the paw from a different angle, and unfortunately there it was... a lesion on the bone of her toe. She did chest x-rays to look for lesions in the lungs and found none. I know that does not mean the cancer hasn't already spread, but at least it means she is a good candidate for treatment. My vet is recommending that we skip the biopsy and amputate the toe ASAP. She said that it will be difficult to biopsy, and that in her opinion it would likely just confirm the need to amputate. As aggressive as that seems, I know that Osteo is extremely aggressive and spreads quickly. A toe amputation doesn't seem nearly as difficult for the dog as a leg amputation would be, so I suppose I can find a sliver lining in that. She said that post-amputation the tumor would be sent to a lab for analysis... to find out if it is osteo, a different form of cancer, or something else. Then we would base any further treatment (like chemo) on that information. Lola does not seem to be in much pain. She favors the other front leg, but she jumps onto and off of our sofa and bed. She runs around the yard. She goes for walks. I know with cancer a lot can change in just a matter of days. We started her on carprofen and a low dose of tramadol, but after two doses of each she actually seems worse... not wanting to finish her food and a little depressed. The carprofen might be making her sick, so I have a call in to my vet about suspending these meds until she needs them... or lowering the dosage even further. We have been going to our vet for years, and we have had good experiences with other vets in her clinic as well. She tends to be cautious when it comes to pursuing aggressive treatments, but in this case she feels it's really the best way to go. I agree with her, but my wife is still not sure. I'm thinking that if we amputate the toe that will get rid of the pain once the toe heals. If it's not cancer, she will be fine without that toe. If it is cancer, we will know exactly what kind we are dealing with. Then we can pursue additional treatment, or at least know what we are dealing with if/when it comes back. In the past we have spent thousands on diagnositcs and treatments (our first grey was diagnosed by MRI after all other tests failed to find a rare nerve sheath tumor), so for Lola we purchased pet insurance through HealthyPaws. I hoped we would never need it with Lola, but now I'm glad we have it. Out of the three sweet greyhounds we have had in our lives, she is the gentlest of them all. We have two young children as well (one and three). We had two greys when our three-year-old was born, and she was only one when we had to say goodbye to our boy Zeke. Our daughter has been very close to Lola, and losing Lola will be hard on her. I have my fingers crossed that the tumor is something else, or that we will get it early enough for Lola to have more years with us. I really hate the fact that this seems to be such a big problem for greyhounds. It's hard to see otherwise healthy dogs frequently taken out by something so fast and insidious. Seeing some of the positive stories reported here gives me hope, but going through this for the third time since 2009 is taking a toll on us. Sean
  17. Guest

    Gi Lymphoma

    We adopted our lovely Kiowa about 5 years ago and she is our silly sassy girl who is loved by everyone! She is 7 years old, and has a brother, Raider (also a grey). Last Thursday, I noticed she was drinking an excessive amount of water and urinating more frequently than normal. By Friday, she seemed weaker and had some diarrhea. She wouldn't eat dinner that evening (we Grey owners KNOW that means something is wrong!). I took her to the Vet immediately and they saw blood in her urine and stool. They gave me special food and some antibiotics and sent us home for the weekend; but the Vet knew something more was wrong. She was still drinking A LOT of water, and ate the special food on Saturday. She also started vomiting and more diarrhea. By Sunday morning, she would not eat again. I cooked her some chicken and rice, which she ate, and was able to keep down. However, by Monday morning she lost her appetite again and we were referred to the Emergency Vet for an ultrasound. By Tuesday the test results confirmed it was Lymphoma (GI tract). We were devastated and amazed at how quickly the symptoms showed up--she was healthy JUST a few days ago. The Vet gave us 3 options: 1. Chemotherapy, 2. Steroids (prednisone) 3. (I don't want to talk about that option yet...). The Vet told us that her response to the prednisone will make her feel better short term by shrinking the tumor and be a good indicator of how she will respond to the Chemo. After a shot of prednisone last night, she finally ate breakfast this morning. They also told us after 4 weeks of Chemo, we should be able to see if it is helping her into remission or not. We feel positive about trying Chemo right now because we still see the light in her eyes and wag in her tail. We definitely don't want her to suffer though any treatment though. I am looking for any helpful advice from those who have experienced GI tract lymphoma. I am bringing Kiowa home today and thinking about things like special food that may help keep her strong through treatment or other helpful hints or resources anyone may know of. Thank you.
  18. Hello all! Not sure if you all remember me posting about Daisy (several months ago) and how we found out she had hemangiosarcoma and had to have her front leg amputated. I am happy to say that she is doing smashing!!!!! She is the most energetic and happy dog ever!!!! Most importantly she is CANCER FREE!!! We still go for checks, but she is doing awesome!!! Even the doctors are amazed!!! Now for my question.....My husband and I are relocating. From Los Angeles all the way to Rock Hill South Carolina. We are hiring movers for the furniture, but we will be driving across with all of the animals. (I dont trust the airlines, and I would never have my pets in the back of an airplane!!!!!!!) So I will have Daisy (the grey) my terrier Tiggy, and my cat, and my husband all in the car for one heck of a drive. My husband and I are thinking the faster we can get through the drive the better. No hotels just passing off the wheel every few hours and find dog parks along the way to let the pups stretch their legs. Or we make the trip longer by staying in hotels at night. I am not sure which the better option is. Also, we will have the cat in a carrier obviously, and the other two free in the back seat with dog beds to sleep on. Did I mention we drive a sedan!!! This trip is going to be tough no matter what!!!! Any suggestions on making this trip easier would be greatly appreciated!!!!!! Daisys story here and here
  19. Hi. My vet tells me she's concerned that my 11.5-year-old grey might have hemangiosarcoma, and she wants to do a punch biopsy. She found a slightly raised area around 2x4 inches on his inner thigh near his groin. It's got a kind of spongy feeling, but there is no discoloration like you see on Google images. She aspirated it twice and both times the pathologist found nothing, but during second aspiration the area puffed up and bleed a lot. The swelling disappeared quickly, and the bleeding stopped after pressure was applied for 5 minutes or so. In addition to his age, the other clue the vet identifies is his weight loss - 2.5 lbs since his previous weigh-in only 4 weeks before. However, this coincides with a change from Orijen grain free and Eukanuba large breed food to low-residue IAMs to deal with ridiculously frequent and smelly gas. It worked, and also his stool is less smelly and a little firmer. Also he puts out about 1/3 less stool with this new food. His appetite, energy and personality seem the same as always. This makes me think the weight loss is not related to cancer, but is instead related to how his body has adjusted to the food change. (Please see my other post about his diet.) Given the above, is hemangiosarcoma a real possibility? Also, what's the point of a biopsy, considering (1) there's no cure for hemangiosarcoma, and (2) at best surgery/treatment can extend a dog's life only 3-6 months? I care for him too much to put him through 3-6 months of pain and trauma. He really hates going to the vet, much less being poked, prodded and stuck with needles, and the last time he was sedated for a teeth cleaning was a terrible experience for him. Thanks.
  20. Hi. This is the first time I've posted here, so here is a brief introduction to our Greyhound: Dash is a 7 year old female greyhound. We adopted Dash in February of 2011; She was 4 years old at the time and had raced for about 2 years in West Virginia. We live on the second floor of a building in Brooklyn, NY. Three weeks ago we got a diagnosis of Osteosercoma in her right rear leg after some xrays were taken. (She had been limping on and off since March, but that is another story). Two weeks ago we had the leg amputated. Chemotherapy began this week. So, two weeks post surgery, besides not rooing for her meals, she is basically acting just like she was at the beginning of the year. Oh, and she is completely freaked out and frightened by the stairs she used to climb to and from our second floor apartment. I have been carrying her and down up the stairs for the last 5 or 6 weeks. As soon as we scheduled the amputation, we ordered Dash a Ruffwear harness. This is been fantastic. It really helped us provide some balance support for her the first couple days after the surgery. Since then it helps get her in and out of the car and provides some sense of security (for her humans) on walks. I was assuming the harness would allow us to aid Dash when she was using stairs. This hasn't gone well. When Dash initially learned how to go up stairs 3 years ago, her strategy was to tackle then as fast as possible in order to get them over with as soon as possible. This strategy worked very well for her until she lost a rear leg. Any advice on how to get her comfortable with stairs again? I'm expecting she will be able to go up and down the stairs with support from a human and the harness. I'd be elated (but not surprised) if she was able to navigate the stairs by herself again. In order for this to happen I assume she needs a different approach to the stairs than 'fast as possible'. I'm not sure how to go about having her unlearn that behavior. Any advice? Help? James (and Kelly) (She has started to pick up a new behavior that is quite funny. She has always been a female that lifts her leg to pee and tends to spread her scent throughout the neighborhood. There is no problem when she tries to lift her fantom leg to pee, but when she lifts her other leg... She initially fell down, but today she has started to do a handstand on her front legs so she can still left her rear leg to pee.)
  21. Hello. My beloved (and first) greyhound, Abacu Racey, who I have had since he was 21 months old, has lung cancer (suspected primary). He will be 11 on May 20. He has been coughing for a couple of months, but the vet didn't think it was serious. Last week, x-rays (read by radiologist specialist) revealed suspected tumor in the caudal lobe of the left lung. His appetite is still very good, energy the same as always, he is happy and wants to play outside. He coughs about 4-5 times a day, for a couple of seconds. It is almost a gagging sound, like he's trying to clear his throat. We've decided not to do any invasive procedures to confirm the diagnosis, and want to just enjoy our remaining time with him. His two brother-greys will be very upset. I've never had to make the decision to send a pet to the Bridge. I'm very scared about how his disease is going to progress. I would appreciate any insight or suggestions that you may have. Thank you, Melissa
  22. Some of you may have read my last post http://forum.greytalk.com/index.php/topic/294571-saving-daisy/?hl=%2Bsaving+%2Bdaisy about Daisy being diagnosed with Hemangiosarcoma. She is 16 days post amp and 3 days after her first chemo treatment. She is doing great. No vomiting or soft poo. She seems to be feeling great, but we are prepared that it may not always be this way. Daisy had her staples out on the 15th and this morning we noticed that a spot on her wound was starting to 'open' I called our vet and took her right in. Fortunately they did not have to give her anymore stiches, just some cream for the wound and told me to put a tshirt on her. HA...put a shirt on Daisy...right! Instead I wrapped her up in a little scarf, a lot easier to tackel than getting her to cooperate putting on one of my husbands tees. Anyway, she is doing awesome and is acting like a totally normal pup The vets today gave her 'Whole body support traumeel rehmannia teapill wei qi booster animax -has anyone used any of these medications and supplements? -how do I stop her from licking her wound other than a tshirt? --Here is Daisy with her cute wrap
  23. Guest

    Saving Daisy

    December 29, 2012 we picked Daisy up from Fast Friends at Joyce's house. Just a small group 4 dogs, Confetti(Daisy) Dick Clark, Champagne , Midnight. Daisy was ours to take home to foster. We knew immediately that we wanted to adopt her! That night she had a little (big) pee pee in the floor, due to our sleepiness. But since then she has been perfectly potty trained. It was love at first sight with Confetti-so we named her Daisy. We noticed that she was limping a bit on her left front leg. I called Joyce and she told us a few things we could do to check it out and we decided that since Tom and Terry were in the area that we would take her by just to have them look at her. We decided that it was a chipped finger nail and proceeded to take her on a walk by the beach in Santa Monica. The next morning we took her on a hike in Malibu. We woke up before dawn and got to see the sun rise. I've seen nothing more beautiful. We took a hike with Tiggy and Daisy. A day I will never forget. We noticed when we got home she had gone from limping on her leg to dragging her leg. This concerned me so I once again called Joyce and told her of my concern the next morning. That same day(Jan 2) I took Daisy to Joyce's house and we decided that she needed to go right away to the vet. I dropped Daisy off and about an hour later while I was in petsmart I got the call that she had a tumor(osteosarcoma) in her leg and that was causing her limping. The only option was amputation and chemo and they set her up for that evening for surgery. My whole world came crashing down. I called Donnie and told him the news. I went and saw Daisy at the vet before she had her surgery. i wanted her to know how much i loved her and that everything would be fine. She had her surgery that evening. The next evening Donnie and I went to go visit her in the hospital( he hadnt seen her since the news) They took us to the "triage" area and we saw Daisy lying there, covered with a blanket and a cone on her head. She was so drugged up on pain pills she couldnt lift her head. She would close her eyes when i touched her nose, i like to think was telling me that she was ok . Seeing her in that state was so hard. The next morning we picked her up. She was walking, wagging her tail and 'chomping' all over the place. With her happy attitude you would have never known that she had just had major surgery. The next few days were difficult on her. A lot of pain, a lot of learning, and a lot of patience. But she got the hang of it and so did we. After a lot of research, we decided to put Daisy on a cancer diet, and a lot of herbs that would help in her fight with cancer. I was so desperate to do anything I could to help her. We had only been with her such a short time, and I was going to do everything I could to save her. Today Jan 15, she had her appointment with the oncologist. Anxious to get her staples out and get her chemo started I waited for the doc to call us back. I saw Joyce in the parking lot and went out to greet her. She was amazed at how well Daisy had healed and then informed me that Daisy didnt have osteo...a moment of relief until she told me that the cancer was in her blood vessels. I stayed calm in front of Joyce and then excused myself to call Donnie. I told him I didnt know anything except that it wasnt osteo. The doc calls us back and when 2 vets come in I know it must be bad. They tell me that Daisy has a very rare form of hemangiosarcoma(cancer of the blood vessels but it attacked her bone) life expectancy 3-6 months with it being in her organs, or about 10-12 months with chemo. I could do nothing but rub Daisys neck as I fought back my tears. I didnt want to get upset until they did the ultrasounds to see where the cancer was. I hugged and kissed Daisy, and they told me to come back in an hour. I immediately called Donnie and broke down. Shes too young. 2 years old and we havent even had her a month. She hasnt lived her life yet. While I am waiting for the vet to call, I went to TJMAxx to get her a new comfy bed, and Dr.Aubry calls me and tells me that the cancer HAS NOT spread! No signs of it!!!! WHEW!!! relief! They went ahead and did a chemo treatment and they will do another in 3 weeks. Hopefully Daisy will not go through getting sick from chemo or anything like that. We are going to continue on her diet and supplements. Anything we can do to improve her quality of life we will. Whatever time we have with Daisy we will cherish. She is a special dog, who was brought into our family for a reason. Youre a fighter Daisy and you inspire me everyday. I love you.
  24. I haven't posted on here a lot. I have only had Daisy less than a month, but we have been through more with her than we probably will with a lifetime of dogs. We got her on Saturday December 29, 2012. On Jan 2, we learned that she had a tumor and had her front left leg and shoulder blade amputated. We were told that it was osteosarcoma. I learned of "Charlie's Cancer diet" through Charlies Dad, and have been doing everything in my power to get Daisy well. This morning I took her in for her first oncology visit and to get her staples removed, and we are told that it is Hermangiosarcoma (cancer of the blood vessels) . They did ultrasounds and thankfully they did not find the cancer anywhere else. They started chemo today, but the doctors do not seem optimistic. However; Daisy is the strongest most inspiring dog I have ever met. Have any of you experienced hermangio? Have you experienced hermangio in the bone? This is my first 'sick' pet and I am willing to do all that I can. I have started her on the 'cancer diet' and I am supplementing her with different teas and herbs to boost her immune system. currently she is taking L-arginine echinacea goldenseal sweet wormwood (arteminisin) cod liver oil milk thistle cats claw dandelion root astragulus root essiac formula whew...any advice suggestions, or info are appreciated -Heather and Daisy <3
  25. Hello all my greyhound was just diagnosed with Osteo and had her front right leg and shoulder blade amputated on Wednesday. She is doing well and will start chemo in 2 weeks. I have been doing a lot of research on cancer killing diets herbs and supplements. Have any of you tried a new diet for your dog with osteo that has helped fight the cancer? I have read about switching to wet food that is high in protein low in carb since carbs feed the cancer cells. However, I hear that greys cant have only wet food because of gum disease. I also hear that raw diets are good but not for dogs undergoing chemo. So I am reaching out to you for help, with your experience. My Daisy is 2 years old and deserves a long happy life. Thank you in advance for your help
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