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winnie

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    Laura

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    Northern Virginia

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Greyaholic

Greyaholic (9/9)

  1. We do have homeowner’s insurance. I guess I never thought to check with them thinking this was something separate since it would involve the dogs being in a workplace. I will call my insurance company on Monday to inquire. Thanks!
  2. DH starts a new job on Monday (yay!) at a brewery. It’s an office job for him - not in the tasting room. One of the job perks is that they allow pets, but the policy says they must be insured. He’s the one in charge of overseeing the policy too, but neither of us have heard of such a thing. A quick Google search doesn’t pull up anything in the US about insurance to bring pets to work. Any suggestions on what type of policy and companies?
  3. Best to reach out to one of the US based groups like SAGE or SHUG because they take care of all the transport, foster the dogs and know their personalities. Our 3 were all 5+ y/o when we adopted them. Like Ducky, we prefer seniors. Our 10 y/o boy Rhythm still has plenty of energy for us.
  4. Since you're in NYC, definitely reach out to Petra with Save a Galgo Espanol (SAGE). She is a wealth of knowledge. We adopted two of our three from SAGE and one from Greyhound Friends of NJ, who also bring in a few galgos each year (before the pandemic).
  5. A dog gets a home that needs one. That's all that matters. We all have our preferences.
  6. I got your PM, but I might as well reply here. We've had 4 retired racing greyhounds and 3 gaglos over the years, currently living with 2 galgos. In general, both breeds share similar temperaments, but I've found that our galgos are much smarter, which isn't always a good thing. They'll keep you on your toes for sure! Greyhounds need to be taught how to do stairs. Galgos usually know how from day 1. One of our galgos can open doors and drawers. They're very resourceful, especially when it comes to food. If you're able to block off your kitchen area, I would do so, with a very tall baby gate (ours are 4' tall). Greyhounds think two dimensionally. Galgos think three dimensionally. While a basic barrier might work for a greyhound, the galgo will think about all the ways they can get around it. We've only had smooth haired galgos. Their skin isn't as delicate as the retired racers we've had. I'd say they're a bit more heartier. Galgos generally have better teeth and are less prone to have sensitive stomachs. Osteosarcoma is less common in galgos, but they can still get it. We lost our first galgo to osteosarcoma. I love both breeds, but galgos are definitely much more like regular dogs. I'm not aware of any good books, but you can follow the galgo adoption groups in Spain (Galgos del Sol and 112 Carlotta Galgos) and in America (Save a Galgo Espanol (SAGE), The Sighthound Underground (SHUG) and Love, Hope, Believe Galgos) on Facebook and check out their websites.
  7. We'll be doing our usual hang out on the lawn at Lakewood on Sunday afternoon drinking lots of Candeo. Stop by! Not sure what other plans are in store right now.
  8. One of our greyhounds was a return from a home with children after she bit them. The previous family gave us a note stating all of the Bonny’s problems. We don’t have children. Bonny exhibited ZERO of the behavior issues mentioned in our home. Even when our young nieces would visit, Bonny’s response to children was simply to leave the room. Our nieces knew better than to follow her. Our conclusion was that the children in her previous home were likely torturing her. Bonny was a true gentle giant and never deserved to be put through living with children that couldn’t follow rules or received no guidance/supervision.
  9. The booklet is very detailed on what wineries are doing. We’ve been going for many years, and are going next week. We don’t really need to do tastings. We plan to just visit our favorites, buy some bottles and hang out outside.
  10. We've had 4 retired racing greyhounds and 3 galgos. Current pack is 2 galgos. In general, I think galgos are healthier. They have better teeth than any of our retired racers and less digestive issues. Statistically, they are less prone to osteosarcoma, although that is what our first galgo died from. As for personalities, our galgos are smarter than our retired racers. That's not meant as an insult to greyhounds. It's just that galgos think three dimensionally and are a bit more "street savvy" thank their cousins. They're not always as well-trained and well-mannered as greyhounds either. With that said, I've come to prefer our galgos. They're more like a regular dog, but just as good looking as a greyhound.
  11. SAGE posted this on Facebook... Yo Galgo, the documentary is now available to watch for free on : https://skinnydogfilms.com/yo-galgo-documentary Please keep in mind, this is only for this weekend, so make sure you make a good hour free to see the documentary. We highly suggest seeing it if you have adopted, plan to adopt or want to learn and get a bit of understanding about the background of the galgo Español.
  12. Galgo Encarna makes for an excellent ergonomic chair support.
  13. It's available from NGA. The breeders/trainers are discouraged from working with anti-racing groups. https://www.ngagreyhounds.com/Adopt
  14. The group we adopted our greyhounds from (GPA-NoVA) folded last year. I’d imagine that others might get more involved with rescuing galgos or greyhounds from overseas, but that may beyond the capacity and budget for some of the smaller groups. And yes, those dogs did not have the same upbringing as what many US greyhound adopters are used to. I consider our galgos to be more like regular dogs that you’d find at a shelter.
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